Profiles

Matthew Schmidt

UTAS Home Dr Matt Schmidt

Matt Schmidt

Lecturer in Exercise Science
Health Sciences (School of )

Room L207 , ABC Building

+61 3 6226 4224 (phone)

Matthew.Schmidt@utas.edu.au

Dr Matt Schmidt is a Lecturer in Exercise Science within the School of Health Science in the College of Health and Medicine. His background spans the human neuro-motor system with expertise in biomechanics, neural control of movement, muscle activation patterns, and force output. Recently he has become involved with gamification for rehabilitation and as a means to promote physical activity.

Biography

Matt completed his PhD in Biomechanics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Upon completion of his doctoral studies, Matt moved to Tasmania to take up a post-doctoral position in neuroscience within the School of Psychology. Following this post-doctoral position, Matt had the privilege of spending two years at home caring for his two young children before returning to University of Tasmania as a post-doctoral researcher to focus on gamification in rehabilitation and physical activity. Matt commenced as his current position as Lecturer in Exercise Science in mid-2015.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA. 2008. Thesis:The control of simple pushing efforts with the leg
  • MSc, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
  • BSc (Maths), University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
  • BSc (Physics), University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Administrative expertise

Dr Schmidt's role has required the coordination of projects involving multiple team members and developing technology to enable research methodology.

Teaching

Biomechanics, Exercise Science, Gamification in rehabilitation and health, Technologies for health.

Teaching expertise

Dr Schmidt has experience with both face-to-face and online modes of teaching  in the areas of; biomechanics, kinesiology, neural control of movement and technology for health living.

Teaching responsibility

View more on Mr Matthew Schmidt in WARP

Expertise

  • Biomechanics
  • Neural control of movement
  • Gamification and technology for health
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
  • Muscle activation patterns
  • Force output

Research Themes

Matt's research interests align to the University's research theme of Better Health. His current research interests focus on using technology and gamification in various ways to benefit one's health and wellbeing. This includes investigating how commercially available health and wellness tracking technologies can be used to promote and maintain physical activity, developing technology to assist in the rehabilitation of balance and movement following injury or the onset of illness, and using video games and new technology to prevent or minimise the onset of age-related changes in motor skills.

Collaboration

Matt is currently involved with several collaborative research projects within the University and with one collaborative project involving the University of Sydney. In addition, Matt works with physiotherapists in the public and private sector to investigate the use of technology and video games in a rehabilitative setting.

Current projects

  • The development and testing of an in home rehabilitation video game in Parkinson's Disease.
  • Sit to Stand:  An in home exercise monitoring system for persons after stroke.

Fields of Research

  • Sensory processes, perception and performance (520406)
  • Physiotherapy (420106)
  • Motor control (420703)
  • Exercise physiology (420702)
  • Sports science and exercise (420799)
  • Central nervous system (320903)
  • Health promotion (420603)
  • Preventative health care (420605)
  • Respiratory diseases (320103)
  • Rehabilitation (420109)
  • Biomechanics (420701)
  • Psychology of ageing (520106)
  • Sports medicine (320225)

Research Objectives

  • Expanding knowledge in psychology (280121)
  • Allied health therapies (excl. mental health services) (200301)
  • Clinical health (200199)
  • Workplace safety (230506)
  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Preventive medicine (200412)
  • Expanding knowledge in the health sciences (280112)
  • Evaluation of health and support services (200299)
  • Disability and functional capacity (200403)
  • Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) (200599)
  • Health education and promotion (200203)
  • Health related to ageing (200502)
  • Public health (excl. specific population health) (200499)
  • Injury prevention and control (200408)
  • Nutrition (200410)

Publications

Total publications

17

Journal Article

(12 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Mainsbridge C, Cooley D, Dawkins S, de Salas K, Tong J, et al., 'Taking a stand for office-based workers' mental health: the return of the microbreak', Frontiers in Public Health, 8 Article 215. ISSN 2296-2565 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00215 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mainsbridge C; Dawkins S; de Salas K; Pedersen SJ

Tweet

2020Schmidt M, Paul SS, Canning CG, Song J, Smith S, et al., 'The accuracy of self-report logbooks of adherence to prescribed home-based exercise in Parkinson's disease', Disability and Rehabilitation pp. 1-8. ISSN 0963-8288 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2020.1800106 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2020Simpson DB, Breslin M, Cumming T, de Zoete SA, Gall SL, et al., 'Sedentary time and activity behaviors after stroke rehabilitation: changes in the first 3 months home', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation pp. 1-10. ISSN 1074-9357 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/10749357.2020.1783917 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Simpson DB; Breslin M; Gall SL; Callisaya ML

Tweet

2019Simpson DB, Bird M-L, English C, Gall SL, Breslin M, et al., 'Connecting patients and therapists remotely using technology is feasible and facilitates exercise adherence after stroke', Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation pp. 1-11. ISSN 1074-9357 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/10749357.2019.1690779 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Simpson DB; Gall SL; Breslin M; Callisaya ML

Tweet

2018Simpson DB, Breslin M, Cumming T, de Zoete S, Gall SL, et al., 'Go home, sit less: the impact of home versus hospital rehabilitation environment on activity levels of stroke survivors', Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 99, (11) pp. 2216-2221. ISSN 0003-9993 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2018.04.012 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Simpson DB; Breslin M; Gall SL; Callisaya ML

Tweet

2017Allen NE, Song J, Paul SS, Smith SS, O'Duffy J, et al., 'An interactive videogame for arm and hand exercise in people with Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial', Parkinsonism and Related Disorders pp. 66-72. ISSN 1353-8020 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2017.05.011 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 7

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2012Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Age-related differences in corticospinal excitability and inhibition during coordination of upper and lower limbs', Neurobiology of Aging, 33, (7) pp. 1484.e1-1484.e14. ISSN 0197-4580 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.12.019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 50

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

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2012Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Tandonnet C, Garry MI, et al., 'Age-related Differences in Corticomotor Excitability and Inhibitory Processes during a Visuomotor RT Task', Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 24, (5) pp. 1253-1263. ISSN 0898-929X (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1162/jocn_a_00201 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 39Web of Science - 42

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

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2011Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, 'Absence of cross-limb transfer of performance gains following ballistic motor practice in older adults', Journal of Applied Physiology, 110, (1) pp. 166-175. ISSN 8750-7587 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00958.2010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 53Web of Science - 51

Co-authors: Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2011Schmidt MW, Hinder MR, Summers JJ, Garry MI, 'Long-Lasting Contralateral Motor Cortex Excitability is Increased by Unilateral Hand Movement That Triggers Electrical Stimulation of Opposite Homologous Muscles', Neurorehabilitation and Neuro Repair, 25, (6) pp. 521-530. ISSN 1545-9683 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/1545968310397202 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: Hinder MR; Summers JJ; Garry MI

Tweet

2010Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'The effect of ballistic thumb contractions on the excitability of the ipsilateral motor cortex', Experimental Brain Research, 201, (2) pp. 229-238. ISSN 0014-4819 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-2029-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2010Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Unilateral contractions modulate interhemispheric inhibition most strongly and most adaptively in the homologous muscle of the contralateral limb', Experimental Brain Research, 205, (3) pp. 423-433. ISSN 0014-4819 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-010-2379-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 52Web of Science - 50

Co-authors: Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

Conference Publication

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Jovic E, Bird ML, Cannell JA, Rathjen A, Lane K, et al., 'Can interactive, motion-capture-based rehabilitation in an inpatient stroke population increase physical activity levels for people undergoing rehabilitation for stroke?', 27th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australasia, 23 - 25 August 2017, Queenstown, New Zealand (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bird ML; Cannell JA; Rathjen A; Tyson AM; Callisaya M; Ahuja KDK

2016Simpson D, Callisaya M, Schmidt M, Bird ML, Teo W-P, et al., 'Assessment: what does technology add to practice', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, pp. S89-S90. ISSN 1063-8652 (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Callisaya M; Bird ML; Brickwood K; Watson G; Williams AD

2011Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Tandonnet C, Garry MI, et al., 'Age-related differences in corticospinal excitability and inhibitory processes during a Go/NoGo reaction time task', Clinical Neurophysiology, 21-25 July 2011, Rome, Italy, pp. S21. ISSN 1388-2457 (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

2011Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Carroll T, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'The neural correlates of ballistic motor learning and cross-limb transfer in young and older adults', Clinical Neurophysiology, 21-25 July 2011, Rome, Italy, pp. S43. ISSN 1388-2457 (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hinder MR; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Schmidt M, Cannell JA, Flanagan K, Sohal SS, Mulford J, et al., ''Champions' of research', The Examiner, Australia, 2 November 2018 (2018) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cannell JA; Flanagan K; Sohal SS; Mulford J; Myers SA

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

9

Total funding

$223,586

Projects

Blundstone Footwear Design: Evidence-Base and Support (2019)$14,317
Description
This project is in collaboration with Blundstone. The goal of the project is to both develop a literature review around \the evidence base to inform boot design and to provide Blundstone with access to expert Biomechanic advice to inform boot design.The proposed work is over a 16 week period with a majority of the work completed in the first 8 weeks. The total labour is 16.5 days with 12 days completed by the 8 week mark. The first 8 weeks will focus on the development of a literature review to establish the current evidence base around footwear design with a specific focus on injury prevention. The specific directions of this review will be determined in consultation with Blundstone so that it meets their needs. Following the initial 8 week period, Blundstone will be in the design and prototype phase. During this phase, week 9 to 16, I will provide biomechanics support to the design team, advice on internal testing of protypes, and finish up any further literature reviews.I view this as a scoping exercise which will allow me to learn more about an area of interest, work on a neat project, and potentially pave the way for future collaboration with Blundstone.
Funding
Blundstone Pty Ltd ($14,317)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schmidt M
Year
2019
State-wide Sports Science Services Strengthening Sport and Health in Tasmania (2019)$56,985
Description
The Sports Performance Optimisation Research Team (SPORT) will develop and deliver a high quality sports science service and education package for schools, sports clubs and individuals throughout the state.
Funding
Tasmanian Community Fund ($56,985)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Pitchford NW; Kitic C; Watson G; Zadow E; McGowan C; Schmidt M; Williams AD
Year
2019
The REACH IT Project: Platform Development and Feasibility Study (2019)$9,091
Description
This project focuses on measuring and enabling in-patient arm use in acute stroke survivors. Funding is being sought from Clifford Craig to acquire pilot data of in-patient arm use via wrist-based accelerometers and the development of in-bed lap tables to enable upper arm movements and rehabilitation.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($9,091)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schmidt M; Cannell J
Year
2019
Exertime: A global e-health solution (2019)$8,340
Description
The UTAS Active Work Lab has developed an e-health solution designed to improve employee health by interrupting long bouts of occupational sitting. The proposed collaborative research project was developed to expand our investigation to an international audience.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($8,340)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Pedersen SJ; Mainsbridge C; de Salas KL; Schmidt M; Dawkins S
Year
2019
Objective measurements of workplace sedentary behaviour (2018)$10,260
Description
Prior work on Exertime, a workplace e-health solution, demonstrates its ability to improve measures of health via the delivery of prompted movement breaks during working hours (e.g., Mainsbridge et al. 2015). It is unknown what causes these health improvements. Putatively, the Exertime software intervention changes the amount and pattern of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in the workplace; this causes improvements in markers of health. However, there is no evidence to support this hypothesis as no quantitative measure of behaviour has been collected in conjunction with the Exertime intervention. This quantitative sensor based data is crucial to establish the connection between behaviour change and health improvements. Crucially, for the first time, it will provide evidence of the magnitude of the changes in sedentary behaviour needed to improve health. Thus, providing an empirical basis for guidelines on reducing sedentary behaviour to improve health. To validate this new technology, physical activity will be measured for a period of seven days at each time point through the use of ActivPal accelerometers. These will be fitted and worn day and night for the entire seven day period. These trackers are reliable and valid and are currently considered the gold standard for physical activity monitoring. Our plan is to first conduct a small validity and feasibility study utilising current Exertime users at UTAS, for which we already have ethics approval.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,260)
Scheme
Better Health Research Development
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Pedersen SJ; Schmidt M; Williams AD; Ahuja KDK; Mainsbridge C
Year
2018
Dual force plate diagnostics in athletic populations (2017 - 2020)$48,000
Description
Improving the performance and/or rehabilitation of elite athletes using novel approaches and techniques that could aid inathlete preparation and performance; and understanding of the mechanisms of lower limb asymmetry as it relates to athlete assessment using dualforce plates.
Funding
Tasmanian Institute of Sport ($48,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schmidt M; Fell JW; Kitic C; Culhane PM; Nimphius S
Period
2017 - 2020
Fit 2 Work Triage System Evaluation (2017)$61,123
Description
To evaluate the Fit for Work Triage System for validity, reliability, sensitivity and specificity so as to enable an employer to confidently, fairly and defensibly manage their duty of care to the entire workforce.
Funding
Department of Industry, Innovation and Science ($30,311); Injury Prevention Services Pty Ltd ($30,812)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Fell JW; Schmidt M; Williams AD; Wu SS
Year
2017
Mobile Solution to Encourage Clients to Exercise at Home (2016 - 2017)$5,523
Description
The aim of the project is to engage clients in home exercise programs to improve their rehabilitation outcomes, through the development of a targeted smart phone application with individualised exercises, diary and interface with clinicians. The application will allow the clinician to take a video of the client performing exercises on their own phone, which they can then refer to when completing the exercises at home to ensure they are doing them correctly. A diary component of the application will allow the dose to be set and allow adherence to exercise to be monitored remotely by the clinician. The application will make it easier for the clinician to monitor and supervise exercise between visits, with flow on benefits to the clients progress.
Funding
MAIB Injury Prevention & Management Foundation ($5,273)
Scheme
Grant-IPMF
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bird ML; Schmidt M; Williams AD; Ahuja KDK
Period
2016 - 2017
Using commercially available technology to increase intensity of practice after stroke (2015)$9,947
Description
Stroke survivors spend most of the day inactive. Intensive repetitive practice improves function. We aim to carry out a pilot study to determine whether a commercially available activity monitor can increase the intensity of therapy in the home after stroke.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($9,947)
Scheme
Grant-Starter
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Callisaya M; Smith Stuart; Schmidt M
Year
2015

Research Supervision

Current

3

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDDual Force Plate Diagnostics in Athletic Populations2018
PhDThe Efficacy of Group Versus Individual Therapy for Children Aged 3-6 years with Sensory Based Feeding Difficulties2018
PhDPreparing Elite Athletes for Competitive Sporting Events Through High Fidelity Training2019