Profiles

Camille White

UTAS Home Dr Camille White

Camille White

Research Fellow

Room 35 , IMAS Taroona

+61 3 6226 8377 (phone)

camille.white@utas.edu.au

Dr Camille White is a Research Fellow at Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania. She is interested in aquaculture environment interactions, in particular how marine food webs assimilate and respond to organic enrichment. Her work focuses on interactions between salmon farming and temperate reef ecosystems, along with trophic links and uptake of marine farm nutrients in the water column.

Biography

Before joining IMAS, Camille completed a PhD at the University of Melbourne examining trophic impacts of aquaculture waste in marine ecosystems.  Prior to this, she worked as a scientist at the Fisheries Research Branch in Victoria, working on variety of subjects, including seagrass ecology, uptake of sewage waste in marine ecosystems and dynamics of small pelagic and demersal fish & invertebrate species in Port Phillip Bay.  She has also worked as a commercial diver and in a technical capacity at the old Tasmanian Aquaculture & Fisheries Institute.

Career summary

Qualifications

PhD

Aquaculture-derived terrestrial fatty acids in marine ecosystems

University of Melbourne

Australia

1/08/2017

BSc (1st Class Hons)

The palaeoecology of three Antarctic saline lakes

University of Tasmania

Australia

1/09/2005

View more on Ms Camille White in WARP

Expertise

  • Aquaculture Environment Interactions
  • Fatty Acids
  • Trophic Ecology
  • Sea Urchins
  • Nutrient dynamics

Research Themes

Camille’s research aligns to the University’s research theme of Marine, Antarctic and Maritime.  Her broad research interests include better understanding how anthropogenic activities influence our coastal marine ecosystems.  Camille is currently working on a number of large projects examining environmental impacts of finfish aquaculture in Tasmania, in particular the development of monitoring techniques to better understand the interaction between aquaculture and Tasmania’s reef ecosystems, as well as spatial and trophic nutrient dynamics around salmon farms. She is also involved in projects examining the suitability of sea urchins for aquaculture in Tasmania and using fatty acids to better understand trophic interactions in reef ecosystems.

Current projects

Dr White is currently working on three projects:

  • Managing ecosystem interactions of salmon aquaculture across differing environments (FRDC)
  • Fisheries biology of short-spined sea urchins in Tasmania (FRDC)

Lipid biomarkers and the diets of key invertebrate species on rocky reefs (Paddy Pallin)

Fields of Research

  • Marine and estuarine ecology (incl. marine ichthyology) (310305)
  • Aquaculture (300501)
  • Natural resource management (410406)
  • Zoology (310999)
  • Wildlife and habitat management (410407)
  • Community ecology (excl. invasive species ecology) (310302)
  • Aquaculture and fisheries stock assessment (300502)
  • Fisheries management (300505)
  • Infectious agents (310702)
  • Environmental management (410404)
  • Pollution and contamination (410599)
  • Fisheries sciences (300599)
  • Separation science (340109)
  • Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine (420899)
  • Horticultural crop growth and development (300802)
  • Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (321402)

Research Objectives

  • Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems (180601)
  • Aquaculture fin fish (excl. tuna) (100202)
  • Fisheries - aquaculture (100299)
  • Coastal or estuarine biodiversity (180203)
  • Coastal and estuarine systems and management (180299)
  • Biodiversity in Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments (180404)
  • Marine biodiversity (180504)
  • Assessment and management of coastal and estuarine ecosystems (180201)
  • Other environmental management (189999)
  • Fisheries - wild caught (100399)
  • Human pharmaceutical products (240899)
  • Nutraceuticals and functional foods (241308)
  • Wild caught fin fish (excl. tuna) (100305)
  • Fisheries - recreational freshwater (100301)
  • Wine grapes (260608)
  • Preventive medicine (200412)

Publications

Total publications

15

Journal Article

(8 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Haugland BT, Armitage CS, Kutti T, Husa V, Skogen MD, et al., 'Large-scale salmon farming in Norway impacts the epiphytic community of Laminaria hyperborea', Aquaculture Environment Interactions, 13 pp. 81-100. ISSN 1869-7534 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/aei00392 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2020Basford AJ, Mos B, Francis DS, Turchini GM, White CA, et al., 'A microalga is better than a commercial lipid emulsion at enhancing live feeds for an ornamental marine fish larva', Aquaculture, 523 Article 735203. ISSN 0044-8486 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735203 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Tweet

2019White CA, Woodcock SH, Bannister RJ, Nichols PD, 'Terrestrial fatty acids as tracers of finfish aquaculture waste in the marine environment', Reviews in Aquaculture, 11, (1) pp. 133-148. ISSN 1753-5123 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/raq.12230 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19

Tweet

2018White CA, Bannister RJ, Dworjanyn SA, Husa V, Nichols PD, et al., 'Aquaculture-derived trophic subsidy boosts populations of an ecosystem engineer', Aquaculture Environment Interactions, 10 pp. 279-289. ISSN 1869-7534 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/aei00270 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 4

Tweet

2017White CA, Bannister RJ, Dworjanyn SA, Husa V, Nichols PD, et al., 'Consumption of aquaculture waste affects the fatty acid metabolism of a benthic invertebrate', Science of The Total Environment, 586 pp. 1170-1181. ISSN 0048-9697 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.02.109 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21

Tweet

2017White CA, Nichols PD, Ross DJ, Dempster T, 'Dispersal and assimilation of an aquaculture waste subsidy in a low productivity coastal environment', Marine Pollution Bulletin, 120, (1-2) pp. 309-321. ISSN 0025-326X (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.05.042 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: Ross DJ

Tweet

2016White CA, Dworjanyn SA, Nichols PD, Mos B, Dempster T, 'Future aquafeeds may compromise reproductive fitness in a marine invertebrate', Marine Environmental Research, 122 pp. 67-75. ISSN 0141-1136 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2016.09.008 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13

Tweet

2009Gibson JAE, Paterson KS, White CA, Swadling KM, 'Evidence for the continued existence of Abraxas Lake, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica during the Last Glacial Maximum', Antarctic Science, 21, (3) pp. 269-278. ISSN 0954-1020 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1017/S0954102009001801 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19

Co-authors: Gibson JAE; Paterson KS; Swadling KM

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Conference Publication

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2008Crawford C, Temby N, Beard J, White CA, 'Developing and implementing a framework for assessment of estuarine health in small Tasmanian estuaries', Program Handbook and Abstracts, 18-22 August 2008, Darwin, Northern Territory (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Crawford C; Temby N; Beard J

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(5 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Beecroft R, Bodrossy L, Brasier M, Brown C, Cossu R, et al., 'Monitoring and assessing offshore/high energy production structures. A report from the Blue Economy Cooperative Research Centre', Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources, Australia, 4.20.001 (2020) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Beecroft R; Bodrossy L; Brasier M; Brown C; Cossu R; Foo D; Lacharite M; Lea M-A; Ross J; Semmens J; Strain E; Ugalde S

2005Crawford C, Neira FJ, White CA, 'Environmental Flows in the Little Swanport Estuary', Natural Heritate Trust (2005) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Crawford C; Neira FJ

2005Crawford C, White CA, 'Establishment of an Integrated Water Quality Monitoring Framework for Georges Bay', Break O'Day Council (2005) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Crawford C

2005Mount RE, Crawford C, Veal CJ, White CA, 'Bringing Back the Bay: Marine Habitats and Water Quality in Georges Bay', Break O'Day Council (2005) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mount RE; Crawford C; Veal CJ

2005Mount RE, Crawford C, Veal CJ, White CA, 'Bringing back the Bay: Marine Habitats and Water Quality in Georges Bay', Break O'Day Council (2005) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mount RE; Crawford C; Veal CJ

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Strain E, White C, Ross J, 'The Storm Bay Observing System: Preliminary review of the sampling parameters and design for assessing the performance of salmon aquaculture', Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Hobart, July, FRDC Proj. 2018/131 (2020) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Strain E; Ross J

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

8

Total funding

$4,353,639

Projects

Monitoring and assessing offshore production structures (2020)$49,972
Description
The expansion of aquaculture/energy production into offshore areas requires the development of science-based automated environmental monitoring platforms. These platforms are important for maintaining public confidence in the associated industry and will reduce the operational costs and risks. Developing these platforms is contingent on ensuring that the environmental footprint and associated monitoring tools are well understood. This project will conduct a systematic review of the literature and consult with stakeholders (e.g. industry, government regulators), to identity the relevant parameters and technologies needed to develop these systems. The results will help to meet the end needs of the expanding industries and the government.
Funding
Blue Economy CRC Co ($49,972)
Scheme
Scoping Study Projects
Administered By
Blue Economy CRC Co
Research Team
Strain EMA; Ross DJ; White CA; Semmens JM; MacLeod C; Lea MA; Frid C
Year
2020
BE Biofouling Challenges and Possible Solutions (2020)$50,224
Description
Towards Biofouling-free Aquaculture and Off-shore Renewable Energy Generation: State-ofthe-Art and R&D PrioritiesProblem statementBiofouling is a notorious problem for the Blue Economy industry on a number of levels:1) Operation/maintenance: mitigating biofouling incurs large operational costs due to theneed for frequent cleaning.2) Infrastructure: Biofouling causes structural damage due to increased drag forces andmaterials degradation.3) Fish health and biosecurity: increased risk of fish stress, diseases, parasites and invasivespecies causing damage to the aquaculture environment.
Funding
Blue Economy CRC Co ($50,224)
Scheme
Scoping Study Projects
Administered By
Blue Economy CRC Co
Research Team
Wang L; Whittle M; Pichard A; Barnes AD; Heitzmann M; Albert S; Veidt M; Falzon P; Asman M; White CA; Cossu R; Ramezani M; Blocher N; Bird S; Rabaey K; Kozielski K
Year
2020
Derwent Estuary Program Reef Monitoring (2019 - 2020)$31,495
Description
This project aims to:1. Use the rocky reef algal communities as a biological indicator of nutrient availability2. Undertake Rapid Visual Assessment (RVA) surveys at six locations twice per year to assess functionality of algae communities.3. Report on how function of algal communities may change over time.
Funding
Derwent Estuary Program ($31,495)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CA; Kruimink S; Johnson OJ
Period
2019 - 2020
Storm Bay Observing System: Assessing the Performance of Aquaculture Development (2019 - 2023)$3,683,628
Description
Storm Bay is identified in the Tasmanian Governments Sustainable Industry Growth Plan for the Salmon Industry as a priority area for the possible expansion of salmonid marine farming. The Governments intention is that the proposed developments would be managed under an adaptive management framework with the following pre-conditions:A staged development approach, with an initial limit on feed input that would provide for 30,000 tonnes of productionA comprehensive environmental monitoring programThe development of a biogeochemical model, to help to understand i) the information provided by the environmental monitoring and ii) the effects of any changes to farming operations in the region.The work proposed in this study will support the design and implementation of an effective, efficient and reliable monitoring program, providing expert advice on sampling locations, timelines and strategies and testing this data over 3-4 years to refine and improve the program. This monitoring program will deliver observational data to directly assess environmental performance and to assist the skill assessment of the integrated 3D model being developed by CSIRO. A second key element of the proposal is to develop a lease scale module for predicting near scale effects; this would be nested and relocatable in the CSIRO modelling system. A comprehensive map of seafloor habitats and bathymetry will underpin the monitoring program and modelling efforts.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($3,683,628)
Scheme
Industry Partnership Agreements - IPA
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ross DJ; MacLeod C; White CA; Hadley SA; Barrett NS; Swadling KM; Lucieer VL
Period
2019 - 2023
Fisheries biology of short-spined sea urchins (Heliocidaris erythrogramma) in Tasmania: supporting a profitable harvest and appropriate management (2017 - 2019)$262,870
Description
Urchins have been fished in Tasmania since the 1980s, yet no significant research has been conducted to support the management of the fishery. Spatial and habitat variability in growth rates, maximum sizes and size at maturity in urchins are not known from key harvesting regions. Furthermore, little is known about the specific factors that influence the general variability in roe quality and yield. The lack of information on the biology, population structure and roe characteristics of the urchin continues to hinder prospects to optimise the wild fishery in Tasmania. Trials of Norwegian technologies to enhance roe quality of urchins harvested from barrens are also set to commence in 2017.This project aims to provide sound scientific knowledge of short-spined urchin growth and reproduction to allow for sustainable management of the fishery. Additional research on roe quality will optimise harvesting strategies and profitability the fishery, while scientific support of farming trials will assist in the management and development of a new industry. Biological sampling will include tagging to estimate growth, while size at maturity and gonad condition will be based on macroscopic staging validated with histology. Roe quality will be determined by a suite of morphologically (colour, texture, granularity, recovery) and biochemical (moisture, protein, lipids, amino acids, glucose and glycogen) indicators and analysed against habitat and environmental parameters.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($262,870)
Scheme
Grant-Annual Open Call Round
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Keane JP; Ling SD; James P; White CA; Robinson N; Ryan Greg; Langdale R; Barrenger M
Period
2017 - 2019
Environment: Emerging Issues (2016)$234,450
Funding
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($234,450)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ross DJ; White CA
Year
2016
Uptake of aquaculture waste by keystone reef species (2016 - 2017)$7,000
Description
Aquaculture of Atlantic salmon in Tasmania is currently expanding, with the potential for adverseinteractions with reef ecosystems a significant concern. As reef ecosystems in Tasmania have broadconservation, social and economic values, there is a need for better understanding of how thesesystems may respond. There are many ways intensive farming of fish can impact on the broaderenvironment, with enhancement of nutrients from waste feed and faeces key amongst these. Usinga lipid biomarker approach, this project aims to determine whether aquaculture waste maysupplement the diet of key mobile invertebrate species (abalone, Haliotis rubra; sea urchins,Heliocidaris erythrogramma; and benthic shrimp, Palaemon intermedius) within reef ecosystems insouth-east Tasmania. Results will provide critical information on how these species may use currentfood resources and whether the addition of aquaculture-derived nutrients and organic carboninfluences food web dynamics. This data will help assess whether these keystone species aresuitable canaries for assessment of overall reef ecosystem health, and addresses a key knowledgegap regarding the broader ecosystem level interactions of intensive fish farming. This project willmake an important contribution to the conservation and management of reef ecosystems, asaquaculture continues to expand into the future.
Funding
Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales ($7,000)
Scheme
Grant-Paddy Pallin Foundation Science
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CA
Period
2016 - 2017
Bringing Back the Bay - an Integrated Management Regime for Georges Bay (2005)$34,000
Funding
Natural Heritage Trust ($34,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
Break'O'Day Council
Research Team
Mount RE; Crawford C; White CA
Year
2005

Research Supervision

Current

4

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDTracing the Fate of Fish farm Derived Nutrients in the Broader Marine Environment2019
PhDThe Effect of Aquaculture on Marine Microbial Communities2019
PhDAssimilation of Aquaculture-Derived Organic Carbon by Temperate Reef Sponge Assemblages2020
PhDAssessing the Use of Different Benthic Imagery Techniques for Monitoring the Effects of Organic Pollution on Deep Reef Habitats2021