Profiles

Katie Cresswell

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Katie Cresswell

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Room 16B , Taroona Admin building

+61 3 6226 8323 (phone)

katie.cresswell@utas.edu.au

Dr Katie Cresswell completed a PhD modelling the behavioural interactions between penguins and krill in the Southern Ocean, specifically for macaroni penguins on the island of South Georgia. Following her PhD, she undertook a 4 year postdoctorate at the University of California, Santa Cruz with Professor Marc Mangel where she extended the behavioural optimisation models predict the effects of climate change and krill fishing on penguins and krill. Her most significant model was a behavioural model of a male and female penguin raising a chick, considering issues such as parental conflict, chick growth and a prey field with variation outside of what the penguins may have adapted to (because of climate change). She is currently posted at her second postdoctoral position at IMAS, UTAS, working on modelling the stock dynamics and removal options for the destructive Longspined sea urchin in Tasmanian waters.

Teaching

Computer modelling, animal behaviour, State-dependent optimisation modelling, mathematical biology, wild fisheries, ecology, ecological modelling, stock assessment, population modelling

View more on Dr Katie Cresswell in WARP

Research Themes

Katie’s research aligns to the University’s research themes of Data, Knowledge and Decisions. Her research involves understanding and calculating how numbers of the destructive Longspined urchin are increasing with time as their populations expand on the East Coast of Tasmania. She is using bioeconomic modelling and stock assessment methods, as well as Management Strategy Evaluation to provide guidance for management decisions such as how much, where and when to subsidise the commercial fishery for Longspined sea urchins, when to consider culling as an option, and what kind of decision making could lead to healthier reefs on the east coast of Tasmania in 1, 5 10 or more years.  She will also be working on larval dispersal models with an aim to better understand large recruitment events and what conditions now and in the future could lead to higher self-recruitment of urchins or potential expansion to the west coast of Tasmania, and what actions could be taken, if any, to prevent this.

Fields of Research

  • Biological mathematics (490102)
  • Fisheries management (300505)
  • Behavioural ecology (310301)
  • Aquaculture and fisheries stock assessment (300502)
  • Ecological impacts of climate change and ecological adaptation (410102)
  • Evolutionary impacts of climate change (310406)
  • Optimisation (490304)
  • Environment and resource economics (380105)
  • Econometrics (380299)
  • Population ecology (310307)

Research Objectives

  • Biodiversity in Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments (180404)
  • Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences (280102)
  • Fisheries - wild caught (100399)
  • Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems (180601)
  • Ecosystem adaptation to climate change (190102)
  • Wild caught edible molluscs (100304)
  • Climate change adaptation measures (excl. ecosystem) (190101)

Publications

Computer modelling, animal behaviour, State-dependent optimisation modelling, mathematical biology, wild fisheries, ecology, ecological modelling, stock assessment, population modelling.

Total publications

14

Journal Article

(12 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Melbourne-Thomas J, Audzijonyte A, Brasier MJ, Cresswell KA, Fogarty HE, et al., 'Poleward bound: adapting to climate-driven species redistribution', Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries ISSN 0960-3166 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s11160-021-09641-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Melbourne-Thomas J; Audzijonyte A; Brasier MJ; Fogarty HE; Haward M; Hobday AJ; Hunt HL; Ling SD; McCormack PC; Trebilco R; Van Putten I; Villanueva C; Watson RA; Pecl GT

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2012Cresswell KA, Wiedenmann JR, Mangel M, 'A model of parental conflict: predicting provisioning behavior of penguin partners in response to local changes in krill', Ecological Modelling, 246 pp. 68-78. ISSN 0304-3800 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2012.06.034 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

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2011Bednarek AT, Cooper AB, Cresswell KA, Mangel M, Satterthwaite WH, et al., 'The certainty of uncertainty in marine conservation and what to do about it', Bulletin of Marine Science, 87, (2) pp. 177-195. ISSN 0007-4977 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5343/bms.2010.1060 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

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2011Wiedenmann J, Cresswell KA, Goldbogen J, Potvin J, Mangel M, 'Exploring the effects of reductions in krill biomass in the Southern Ocean on blue whales using a state-dependent foraging model', Ecological Modelling, 222, (18) pp. 3366-3379. ISSN 0304-3800 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2011.07.013 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 28

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2010Mangel M, Richerson K, Cresswell KA, Wiedenmann JR, 'Modelling the effects of UV radiation on the survival of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) in the face of limited data', Ecological Modelling, 221, (17) pp. 2095-2101. ISSN 0304-3800 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2010.06.005 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

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2009Cresswell KA, Tarling GA, Thorpe SE, Burrows MT, Wiedenmann J, et al., 'Diel vertical migration of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is flexible during advection across the Scotia Sea', Journal of Plankton Research, 31, (10) pp. 1265-1281. ISSN 0142-7873 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fbp062 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 18

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2009Wiedenmann J, Cresswell KA, Mangel M, 'Connecting recruitment of Antarctic krill and sea ice', Limnology and Oceanography, 54, (3) pp. 799-811. ISSN 0024-3590 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.4319/lo.2009.54.3.0799 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 30Web of Science - 32

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2008Cresswell KA, Wiedenmann J, Mangel M, 'Can macaroni penguins keep up with climate- and fishing-induced changes in krill?', Polar Biology, 31, (5) pp. 641-649. ISSN 0722-4060 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00300-007-0401-0 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16

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2008Wiedenmann J, Cresswell K, Mangel M, 'Temperature-dependent growth of Antarctic krill: predictions for a changing climate from a cohort model', Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 358 pp. 191-202. ISSN 0171-8630 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps07350 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 31Web of Science - 33

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2007Cresswell KA, Tarling GA, Burrows MT, 'Behaviour affects local-scale distributions of Antarctic krill around South Georgia', Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 343 pp. 193-206. ISSN 0171-8630 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps06908 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16

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2007Cresswell KA, Tarling GA, Trathan PN, 'Weight loss during breeding is adaptive for female macaroni penguins, Eudyptes chrysolophus', Evolutionary Ecology Research, 9, (7) pp. 1053-1076. ISSN 1522-0613 (2007) [Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 4

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2005Xavier JC, Croxall JP, Cresswell KA, 'Boluses: an effective method for assessing the proportions of cephalopods in the diet of albatrosses', Auk, 122, (4) pp. 1182-1190. ISSN 0004-8038 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1642/0004-8038(2005)122[1182:BAEMFA]2.0.CO;2 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 23

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Chapter in Book

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2011Cresswell KA, Satterthwaite WH, Sword GA, 'Understanding the evolution of migration through empirical examples', Animal Migration: A Synthesis, Oxford University Press, EJ Milner-Gulland, JM Fryxell, ARE Sinclair (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 7-16. ISBN 9780199568994 (2011) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Cresswell KA, Keane JP, Ogier EM, Yamazaki S, 'Centrostephanus Subsidy Program: Initial Evaluation', Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (2019) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Keane JP; Ogier EM; Yamazaki S

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

4

Total funding

$334,857

Projects

Larval dispersal for Southern Rock Lobster and Longspined sea urchin to support management decisions (2022 - 2024)$242,861
Description
Larval dispersal patterns for Southern Rock Lobster, Jasus edwardsii, and Long-spined sea urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, remain poorly understood. Understanding spatial dispersal patterns is essential for spatial management of these species. Likewise, inter-annual variability in dispersal can lead to low lobster recruitment with large fishery consequences whilst increases in larval dispersal may be responsible for the establishment of Long-spined sea urchin in Tasmania.Our objectives are:Update/develop source/sink connectivity matrices to include contemporary oceanographic models and realistic biological parameterisation.Combine connectivity matrix with knowledge of egg production in different areas to give an understanding of the magnitude of larval flow and identify key source areas for Southern Rock Lobster and Long-spined sea urchin larvae.Determine impact of high recruitment events on Long-spined sea urchin populations in Tasmania and the likelihood of self-recruitment and incursion to the south west of Tasmania with various population growth and climate change scenarios.Investigate various management options for Southern Rock Lobster and Long-spined sea urchin utilising outcomes from Objective 2 and Objective 3.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($242,861)
Scheme
Grant-Annual Open Call Round
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cresswell KA; Hartmann K; Tracey S
Period
2022 - 2024
Obtaining fine-scale effort and catch data for assessing the Centrostephanus rodgersii fishery. (2019)$26,996
Description
Access to a continuous measure of fine-scale effort and catch data from the Centro fishery will allow us to assess the cost-effectiveness of subsidising the fishery to protect and recover productive abalone reefs. Funding is requested to build 12 GPS and depth data logger units for the collection of fine-scale effort data on the commercial fishery for Centrostephanus rodgersii. These units will be added to an already existing order of 140 units to be used by commercial abalone divers. Because the units are multi-species capable and more than half the active Centro commercial divers also harvest abalone, we are requesting these additional 12 units to cover the remaining Centro divers and to enable complete coverage of the urchin fishery fleet. We also request funding for electronic callipers for use in obtaining size structure of the catch arriving at the processing factory. These callipers will assist with identifying whether changes in harvested sizes are associated with fishing pressure, or with a shift in the location of fishing.
Funding
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($26,996)
Scheme
Abalone Overcatch Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cresswell KA; Forbes LK
Year
2019
Evaluation of the subsidy for the Centrostephanus fishery (2019)$40,000
Description
The commercial fishery for Centrostephanus rodgersii sea urchins in Tasmania has been subsidised through the Tasmanian Abalone Council for around 2.5 seasons at a cost of $0.75/kg in an effort to control increasing population numbers. Recent significant increases in total commercial catch have necessitated an evaluation of expenditure on the urchin harvest subsidy. This project will evaluate the existing spatial and economic effectiveness of the subsidy and investigate various possible future structures for the subsidy, including spatial and seasonal price structuring and the effect of possible removal or gradual reductions in the subsidy. Areas where knowledge is lacking and targeted data collection will be identified to provide guidance for future subsidy decisions.Our aims are the following: - Evaluate the existing subsidy structure and its effectiveness at achieving its original goals - Gather information from divers and processors (through survey) to identify key challenges in harvesting process, and what incentives or changes could lead to improved harvesting efficiency - Test possible alternative structures for subsidy, including reduction or cessation - Identify key areas of data collection (including method) needed to best assess the subsidy program over the next 1-3 years and to allow the formulation of an optimal urchin harvest strategy
Funding
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($40,000)
Scheme
Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cresswell KA; Keane JP; Ogier EM; Yamazaki S
Year
2019
Modelling fine-scale larval dispersal for Centrostephanus rodgersii (2019)$25,000
Description
We know that Centrostephanus rodgersii sea urchins have most likely arrived to the east coast of Tasmania from NSW and Victoria via larval transport in the East Australian Current. However, we do not have a solid understanding of how often large recruitment events are likely to occur and which particular reefs are the greatest probable supply/source of larvae to Tasmania. We aim to develop a larval dispersal model for Centro based on an existing dispersal model, combining coarse-scale current simulations ofthe CONNIE model with fine-scale resolution of the Southeast Tasmanian model, and estimates of the biology and vertical behaviour of Centro larvae (communication with and publications from Maria Byrne). Using this model, we can input various scenarios of climate change to predict changes in recruitment pulses and the likelihood of the Tasmanian population producing viable self-recruits.
Funding
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($25,000)
Scheme
Abalone Industry Reinvestment Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cresswell KA; Hartmann K; Tracey S
Year
2019

Research Supervision

Current

1

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDOptimising Data Collection and Robust Tag-Based Assessment Strategies for Exploratory Fisheries2019