Profiles

Ryan Day

UTAS Home Dr Ryan Day

Ryan Day

Research Fellow

Room Room 16 , IMAS Taroona

+61 3 6226 8202 (phone)

Ryan.Day@utas.edu.au

View more on Dr Ryan Day in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Animal structure and function (310911)
  • Fisheries management (300505)
  • Aquaculture and fisheries stock assessment (300502)
  • Post-harvest fisheries technologies (incl. transportation) (300506)
  • Aquaculture (300501)
  • Zoology (310999)
  • Noise and wave pollution processes and measurement (410502)
  • Fish physiology and genetics (300504)
  • Gastroenterology and hepatology (320209)
  • Animal behaviour (310901)
  • Invertebrate biology (310913)
  • Wildlife and habitat management (410407)
  • Oceanography (370899)

Research Objectives

  • Marine biodiversity (180504)
  • Wild caught rock lobster (100307)
  • Wild caught edible molluscs (100304)
  • Environmentally sustainable energy activities (170599)
  • Fisheries - aquaculture (100299)
  • Aquaculture rock lobster (100206)
  • Wild caught crustaceans (excl. rock lobster and prawns) (100303)
  • Fish product traceability and quality assurance (109903)
  • Assessment and management of benthic marine ecosystems (180501)
  • Wild caught fin fish (excl. tuna) (100305)
  • Health education and promotion (200203)
  • Fisheries - recreational freshwater (100301)
  • Coal exploration (170201)

Publications

Total publications

19

Journal Article

(16 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Day RD, Fitzgibbon QP, McCauley RD, Hartmann K, Semmens JM, 'Lobsters with pre-existing damage to their mechanosensory statocyst organs do not incur further damage from exposure to seismic air gun signals', Environmental Pollution, 267 Article 115478. ISSN 0269-7491 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115478 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Hartmann K; Semmens JM

Tweet

2019Day RD, Fitzgibbon QP, Gardner C, 'The impact of holding stressors on the immune function and haemolymph biochemistry of Southern Rock Lobsters (Jasus edwardsii)', Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 89 pp. 660-671. ISSN 1050-4648 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.fsi.2019.03.043 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Gardner C

Tweet

2019Day RD, McCauley RD, Fitzgibbon QP, Hartmann K, Semmens JM, 'Seismic air guns damage rock lobster mechanosensory organs and impair righting reflex', Royal Society of London. Proceedings B, 286, (1907) Article 20191424. ISSN 0962-8452 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2019.1424 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Hartmann K; Semmens JM

Tweet

2017Day RD, McCauley RD, Fitzgibbon QP, Hartmann K, Semmens JM, 'Exposure to seismic air gun signals causes physiological harm and alters behavior in the scallop Pecten fumatus', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America, 114, (40) pp. E8537-E8546. ISSN 0027-8424 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1700564114 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Hartmann K; Semmens JM

Tweet

2017Fitzgibbon QP, Day RD, McCauley RD, Simon CJ, Semmens JM, 'The impact of seismic air gun exposure on the haemolymph physiology and nutritional condition of spiny lobster, Jasus edwardsii', Marine Pollution Bulletin, 25 pp. 146-156. ISSN 0025-326X (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.08.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Simon CJ; Semmens JM

Tweet

2017McCauley RD, Day RD, Swadling KM, Fitzgibbon QP, Watson RA, et al., 'Widely used marine seismic survey air gun operations negatively impact zooplankton', Nature Ecology & Evolution, 1 Article 0195. ISSN 2397-334X (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41559-017-0195 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 70Web of Science - 62

Co-authors: Swadling KM; Fitzgibbon QP; Watson RA; Semmens JM

Tweet

2016Day RD, McCauley RD, Fitzgibbon QP, Semmens JM, 'Seismic air gun exposure during early-stage embryonic development does not negatively affect spiny lobster Jasus edwardsii larvae (Decapoda:Palinuridae)', Scientific Reports, 6 Article 22723. ISSN 2045-2322 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/srep22723 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Semmens JM

Tweet

2016Day RD, Mueller F, Carseldine L, Meyers-Cherry N, Tibbets IR, 'Ballistic Beloniformes attacking through Snell's Window', Journal of Fish Biology, 88, (2) pp. 727-734. ISSN 0022-1112 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/jfb.12799 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Tweet

2014Day RD, Tibbetts IR, Secor SM, 'Physiological responses to short-term fasting among herbivorous, omnivorous, and carnivorous fishes', Journal of Comparative Physiology B, 184, (4) pp. 497-512. ISSN 0174-1578 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00360-014-0813-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 33Web of Science - 32

Tweet

2011Day R, German DP, Tibbetts IR, 'Why can't young fish eat plants? Neither digestive enzymes nor gut development preclude herbivory in the young of a stomachless marine herbivorous fish', Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part B, 158, (1) pp. 23-29. ISSN 1096-4959 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpb.2010.09.010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 11

Tweet

2011Day RD, German DP, Manjakasy JM, Farr I, Hansen MJ, et al., 'Enzymatic digestion in stomachless fishes: how a simple gut accommodates both herbivory and carnivory', Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, 181, (5) pp. 603-613. ISSN 0174-1578 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00360-010-0546-y [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 35Web of Science - 33

Tweet

2009Buddery A, Kemp A, Day RD, Tibbetts IR, 'Ultrastructure and the importance of wear in the dentition of the halfbeak (Pisces: Hemiramphidae) pharyngeal mill', Journal of Morphology, 270, (3) pp. 357-366. ISSN 0362-2525 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/jmor.10696 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Tweet

2009Manjakasy JM, Day RD, Kemp A, Tibbetts IR, 'Functional morphology of digestion in the stomachless, piscivorous needlefishes Tylosurus gavialoides and Strongylura leiura ferox (Teleostei: Beloniformes)', Journal of Morphology, 270, (10) pp. 1155-1165. ISSN 0362-2525 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/jmor.10745 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10

Tweet

2008Tibbetts IR, Day RD, Carseldine L, 'Development of the pharyngeal dentition of two herbivorous halfbeaks (Teleostei : Hemiramphidae) and implications for the hemiramphid ontogenetic trophic shift', Marine and Freshwater Research, 59, (2) pp. 117-124. ISSN 1323-1650 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/MF07026 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

Tweet

2007Rubin DT, Ulitsky A, Poston J, Day R, Huo D, 'What is the most effective way to communicate results after endoscopy?', Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 66, (1) pp. 108-112. ISSN 0016-5107 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.gie.2006.12.056 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16

Tweet

2006Hale ME, Day RD, Thorsen DH, Westneat MW, 'Pectoral fin coordination and gait transitions in steadily swimming juvenile reef fishes', Journal of Experimental Biology, 209 pp. 3708-3718. ISSN 0022-0949 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1242/jeb.02449 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26

Tweet

Conference Publication

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Fitzgibbon Q, Day R, McCauley R, Semmens J, 'Physiological impacts of seismic air gun exposure on spiny lobster (Jasus edwardsii)', Abstracts for the 11th International Conference and Workshop on Lobster Biology and Management, 04-09 June, Portland, Maine, USA, pp. 65. (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon Q; Semmens J

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Bonney L, Mirowski LT, Day R, Seabourne M, vanWinden S, et al., 'Traceability Systems for Wild Caught Lobster, Via Sense-T and Pathways to Market - Phase Two: Development and Implementation', Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Hobart, Tasmania, 978-0-646-81652-4 (2019) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bonney L; Mirowski LT; Seabourne M; vanWinden S; Verma S; Vo SA; Gardner C; Turner P

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Day RD, McCauley RD, Fitzgibbon QP, Hartmann K, Semmens JM, 'Assessing the impact of marine seismic surveys on southeast Australian scallop and lobster fisheries', Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, University of Tasmania, Hobart, FRDC 2012/008 (2016) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fitzgibbon QP; Hartmann K; Semmens JM

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

7

Total funding

$2,569,059

Projects

Giant Crab Literature Review Stage 1 (2021)$20,458
Description
The first stage is required to ensure the ConocoPhillips has enough information to review its own Environment Plansubmission and make adaptive changes to the survey to appropriately protect giant crabs proximate to the Sequoia seismicsurvey. The output is expected to be a draft report containing most of the literature review
Funding
ConocoPhillips Australia ($20,458)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Semmens JM; Day R; Peinado Fuentes P
Year
2021
Can novel seismic survey sources mitigate potential impacts to fisheries? (2021 - 2023)$998,608
Description
3D Marine seismic surveys (MSS) are typically used by the petroleum industry to locatepotential oil and gas deposits. In Australia, the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and EnvironmentalManagement Authority (NOPSEMA) requires an Environmental Plan (EP) be developed to demonstrate that theMSS will be carried out in a manner that is consistent with the principles of ecologically sustainable development,and that the environmental impacts and risks associated with the MSS will be reduced to as low as reasonablypracticable. However, during the public consultation phase of the EP, there is often a perceived conflict betweenthe proponents of the survey and the fishing industry, with the later party often concerned that the survey willharm the fishery stocks and their livelihoods. As such, there is a need to break the continual cycle where each EPseemingly triggers the same ill feeling and distrust from the fishing industry. One possible way to do this is tointroduce new seismic sources or ways of using current sources, such that some or all of the potential impactsare mitigated. While there are new seismic sources and source designs that should lessen any impact onanimals, these have not been tested with animals anywhere in the world and have never been tested or used inAustralia in general and only sparsely overseas. As such there is an urgent need to compare a current industrystandard seismic array to arrays using alternate sources of seismic signals or different source designs todetermine the relative impact of each on marine animals, while also comparing the quality of the geophysicalrecords obtained from each source. This approach would put Australian fisheries management, NOPSEMA,Australian Oil and Gas, the fishing industry, etc. ahead of the game of determining what alternate sources willreduce conflict between two key industries. It would also move us into a position to start mitigating the impacts ofseismic surveys, rather than the situation we currently have, where each individual seismic survey causes a largeamount of angst between a large number of stake holders.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($998,608)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Day R; Leon RI; Semmens JM; McCauley Rob
Period
2021 - 2023
Wider investigation of the use of video survey techniques to determine commercial scallop abundance in inshore and offshore waters, closed areas and juvenile beds (2021 - 2023)$355,509
Description
The Tasmanian Scallop Fishery contains a network of scallop dredge prohibited areas and shark refuge areas where commercial harvesting of scallops is not allowed. Scallop dredging is also prohibited in waters less than 20 m deep. These areas contain an unknown scallop biomass that may contribute to recruitment into areas accessible to scallop dredging. A recent towed video scallop survey of Great Oyster Bay undertaken by IMAS demonstrated the utility of towed camera surveys in areas that are closed to scallop dredging. This survey was also able to demonstrate the ability of a towed camera to detect small scallops that otherwise would not be detected in a scallop dredge survey. Towed video surveys may also be able to be used in conjunction with dredge surveys to gain a wider understanding of the scallop population and seabed community structure (i.e. identify sensitive seabed habitat types) prior to commercial harvesting, and better define areas of very small scallops that should be avoided during a closed season. This project will provide a better understanding and knowledge of the scallop distribution and abundance in inshore waters that may contribute towards recruitment to waters available to the commercial scallop fishery. It aims to development of a towed video process to supplement commercial dredge surveys to assist with the identification of presence of very small scallops.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($355,509)
Scheme
Grant-Annual Open Call Round
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Day R; Scoulding B; Ryan T; Semmens JM
Period
2021 - 2023
Improving the Southern Rock Lobster on-vessel handling practices, data collection and industry tools for lobster quality assessment (2020 - 2022)$538,604
Description
Investigate the impacts of on-vessel and maintenance practices on live SRL post-harvest performance.2. Develop practical tools for the improved management of SRL industry live lobster operations (i.e. hand0held lactate meter and refractive indexincluding thresholds for poor lobster performance).3. Extend findings to the SRL industry (best practice guides and workshops) and incorporation of results into the SRL Clean green program.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($538,604)
Scheme
Grant-Annual Open Call Round
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Fitzgibbon Q; Gardner C; Smith GG; Day R; Turner P
Period
2020 - 2022
Examining the potential impacts of seismic surveys on octopus and larval stages of Southern Rock Lobster (2020 - 2022)$606,770
Description
CGG has NOPSEMA approval for a 3D seismic survey in the Gippsland Basin to commence in early 2020. This survey overlaps the Victorian shelter-pot octopus fishery off Lakes Entrance. This overlap has raised concerns about the potential impacts to octopus and the fishers from the survey. Tank-based experiments simulating seismic exposure have resulted in high levels of damage in several species of octopus, however, it is unclear how experiments conducted in tanks translate into the field. Field-based seismic experiments are rarely conducted on invertebrates, however, a recent study by the applicants (FRDC 2012-008) demonstrated significant impact on scallops from seismic signals. Like scallops, the benthic and relatively sessile habit of octopus leaves them potentially vulnerable to impacts, as they have limited capacity to avoid the waterborne and ground-borne energy of seismic signals. CCG has acknowledged these potential impacts and is supporting this research, through the formation of a Scientific Advisory Committee, a cash contribution and the use of a full seismic survey, with the lack of a full array often a limitation of seismic research. This project will use a field and laboratory experimental approach to provide a thorough assessment of the potential impacts of seismic surveys on octopus pallidus (the primary species captured in the fishery) in the natural environment, as a model species for octopus fisheries. Additionally, the project will examine the potential impact of the seismic survey on octopus catches and catch rates. These approaches will assist octopus fisheries and petroleum regulators to make informed decisions on the timing and manner in which future surveys are performed. Importantly, along with that of CGG, it has the support of the Victorian Fisheries Authority, who have also offered in-kind support, the two octopus fishers in the region, the Lakes Entrance Fishermens co-op and the sustainable shark fishing association.ObjectivesNo.Details1Determine the impact of intense low frequency acoustic signals on adult pale octopus (Octopus pallidus)2Determine the impact of intense low frequency acoustic signals on the development of eggs, hatching rates and competency of the resultant hatchlings.3Outline threshold distances for potential impacts of seismic surveying4Determine the impact of intense low frequency acoustic signals on pale octopus (Octopus pallidus) catch.
Funding
Fisheries Research & Development Corporation ($606,770)
Scheme
Grant-Annual Open Call Round
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Semmens JM; Day R; Hartmann K; Fitzgibbon Q; Swadling KM
Period
2020 - 2022
Development of a Post-Harvest Handling and Processing Training Program for the Chinese Segment of the Southern Rock Lobster Supply Chain (2019)$25,000
Description
This project will develop a training program for Chinese SRL stakeholders to train and educate them on Australian best practices for post-harvest SRL physiology and health, traceability systems and technologies, and supply chain logistics.
Funding
Department of Agriculture ($25,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Day R; Turner P; Fitzgibbon Q; Gardner C; Shen X; Taskhiri M
Year
2019
Is oil and gas exploration causing a seismic shift in zooplankton? (2015)$24,110
Description
This project aims to conduct the first ever study investigating whether the air gun signals from marine seismic surveys adversely impact the zooplankton community. An interdisciplinary field-based approach, incorporating a seismic air gun array, will be adopted to test the hypothesis that the discharge of seismic air guns reduces zooplankton density. Specifically, the project aims to: 1) develop innovative approaches for monitoring zooplankton response to seismic air gun exposure; 2) quantify zooplankton biomass prior to and following a seismic survey; 3) identify zooplankton taxa resilience or sensitivity to air gun exposure; 4) determine impacts of particular seismic signal components (e.g. sound pressure vs. particle motion); 5) determine threshold limits for seismic air gun exposure, such that the oil and gas exploration industry can operate in a manner that limits impacts on important zooplankton fauna.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($24,110)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Day R; Fitzgibbon Q
Year
2015