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Martin Schultz

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Martin Schultz

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Menzies Institute for Medical Research

Room 363-04, Medical Science 2, Hobart CBD Campuses

+61 3 6226 4264 (phone)

Martin.Schultz@utas.edu.au

Dr Schultz is an early career postdoctoral research fellow at the Menzies Institute for Medical Research. Despite being only 2 years post PhD, he holds a research fellowship from the Heart Foundation of Australia, and has received multiple awards (including the Royal Society of Tasmania doctoral award – best science PhD in Tasmania 2014), as well as several research grants and has been an invited presenter at several international meetings and institutions.

Dr Schultz completed undergraduate study in exercise science at the University of Ballarat (2004-6) as well as a Master of Exercise Rehabilitation (2007-8) to gain accreditation as a clinical exercise physiologist (AEP). In 2013 he completed a PhD in exercise haemodynamics at the University of Tasmania, which resulted in several high-impact publications, conference presentations and academic awards.

Dr Schultz performs regular clinical AEP work and has continually served on the ESSA Tasmanian state chapter committee since 2010 in various roles (currently treasurer).

Dr Schultz is currently a co-supervisor of 3 PhD students (exercise physiology) and provides regular mentorship for undergraduate exercise science/physiology and research higher degree students.

Biography

Dr Schultz is in the early stage of a research career. Before joining the University of Tasmania, he completed undergraduate study at the University of Ballarat, Victoria in exercise science (2004-7) and a Master of exercise rehabilitation (2008) to gain clinical accreditation as an exercise physiologist (AEP). 

Martin began doctoral studies at the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania in 2009, joining the blood pressure research group and was awarded his PhD in 2013. The next year he was awarded a highly competitive postdoctoral research fellowship form the National heart Foundation to continue his research in cardiovascular health at Menzies.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Tasmania, Australia, 2013. Exercise haemodynamics: Physiology and clinical consequences
  • M.App.Sci (Exercise Rehabilitation), Federation University (University of Ballarat), Australia, 2009
  • Grad.Dip (Exercise Rehabilitation), Federation University (University of Ballarat), Australia, 2007
  • B.App.Sci (Human Movement), Federation University (University of Ballarat), Australia, 2009

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) – Member and Accredited Exercise Physiologist (AEP)
  • High Blood Pressure Research Council of Australia (HBPRCA) – Member
  • Artery Society (Europe) – Member

Teaching

Teaching expertise

  • Cardiovascular physiology
  • Exercise physiology
  • Arterial haemodynamics
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Central blood pressure
  • Clinical research

Research Appointments

  • Treasurer – Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) Tasmania

Research Invitations

  • Invited presentation 'Exercise Hypertension' – International Society of Hypertension world congress, Athens Greece 2014
  • Invited presentations to Imperial College London and Cardiff Metropolitan University 'In human studies of the aortic reservoir' 2014
  • Invited Presentation 'Exercise Haemodynamics' – Royal society of Tasmania 2014

View more on Dr Martin Schultz in WARP

Research Themes

Dr Schultz's research interests broadly include cardiovascular and exercise physiology, in alignment with the University's research theme of Better Health and the cardio-metabolic research theme at Menzies. The blood pressure research group is focused on improving health outcomes related to high blood pressure. Dr Schultz works across a number areas with this goal in mind, including research aimed at determining the underlying physiology and clinical consequences of both exercise and central blood pressure, which are viewed as new and novel markers of risk related to blood pressure.

Collaboration

  • Dr Justin Davies – Imperial College London, UK (Arterial haemodynamic studies)
  • Prof Alun Hughes – University College London, UK (Arterial haemodynamic studies)
  • Dr Eric Stohr – Cardiff Metropolitan University, UK (Exercise Physiology, ventricular-arterial interaction studies)

Awards

  • Postdoctoral Research Fellowship – National Heart Foundation (2014-16)
  • Royal Society of Tasmania Doctoral (PhD) award – (2013)

Current projects

  1. EXERTION: The EXERcise stress Test collaboration
  2. UNMASKING BP – unmasking BP and cardiovascular abnormalities with exercise
  3. Assessing and improving  the performance of central blood pressure measurement devices
  4. Understanding the relationship between the heart & the arteries under resting & exercise conditions

Fields of Research

  • Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases) (110201)
  • Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology (110299)
  • Exercise Physiology (110602)
  • Clinical Sciences (110399)
  • Rheumatology and Arthritis (110322)
  • Health Promotion (111712)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology (110308)
  • Primary Health Care (111717)
  • Preventive Medicine (111716)
  • Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) (110321)
  • Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases (110904)

Research Objectives

  • Cardiovascular System and Diseases (920103)
  • Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) (920199)
  • Diagnostic Methods (920203)
  • Preventive Medicine (920412)
  • Behaviour and Health (920401)
  • Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis) (920116)
  • Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) (920599)
  • Nervous System and Disorders (920111)

Publications

Total publications

44

Highlighted publications

(2 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2013Journal ArticleSchultz MG, Davies JE, Roberts-Thomson P, Black JA, Hughes AD, et al., 'Exercise central (aortic) blood pressure is predominantly driven by forward traveling waves, not wave reflection', Hypertension, 62, (1) pp. 175-182. ISSN 0194-911X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00584 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2013Journal ArticleSchultz MG, Otahal P, Cleland VJ, Blizzard L, Marwick TH, et al., 'Exercise-induced hypertension, cardiovascular events, and mortality in patients undergoing exercise stress testing: a systematic review and meta-analysis', American Journal of Hypertension, 26, (3) pp. 357-366. ISSN 0895-7061 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hps053 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 92Web of Science - 97

Co-authors: Otahal P; Cleland VJ; Blizzard L; Sharman JE

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Journal Article

(42 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Armstrong MK, Schultz MG, Picone DS, Black JA, Dwyer N, et al., 'Brachial and radial systolic blood pressure are not the same : evidence to support the Popeye phenomenon', Hypertension, 73, (5) pp. 1036-1041. ISSN 0194-911X (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.119.12674 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Picone DS; Sharman JE

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2019Armstrong MK, Schultz MG, Picone DS, Sharman JE, 'Aortic-to-brachial artery stiffness gradient is not blood pressure independent', Journal of Human Hypertension, 33, (5) pp. 385-392. ISSN 0950-9240 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41371-018-0154-y [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Picone DS; Sharman JE

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2019Huang Z, Sharman JE, Fonseca R, Park C, Chaturvedi N, et al., 'Masked hypertension and submaximal exercise blood pressure among adolescents from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC)', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports pp. 1-6. ISSN 0905-7188 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/sms.13525 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman JE; Fonseca R

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2019Pare M, Goupil R, Fortier C, Mac-Way F, Madore F, et al., 'Determinants of increased central excess pressure in dialysis: role of dialysis modality and arteriovenous fistula', American Journal of Hypertension pp. 1-28. ISSN 0895-7061 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpz136 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2019Schultz MG, Park C, Fraser A, Howe LD, Jones S, et al., 'Submaximal exercise blood pressure and cardiovascular structure in adolescence', International Journal of Cardiology, 275 pp. 152-157. ISSN 0167-5273 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.10.060 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2019Fortier C, Cote G, Mac-Way F, Goupil R, Desbiens L-C, et al., 'Prognostic value of carotid and radial artery reservoir-wave parameters in end-stage renal disease', Journal of the American Heart Association, 8, (13) Article e012314. ISSN 2047-9980 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.119.012314 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2018Crisford P, Winzenberg T, Venn A, Schultz M, Aitken D, et al., 'Factors associated with physical activity promotion by allied and other non-medical health professionals: a systematic review', Patient Education and Counseling, 101, (10) pp. 1775-1785. ISSN 0738-3991 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2018.05.011 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2

Co-authors: Crisford P; Winzenberg T; Venn A; Aitken D; Cleland V

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2018Picone DS, Schultz MG, Peng X, Black JA, Dwyer N, et al., 'Intra-arterial analysis of the best calibration methods to estimate aortic blood pressure', Journal of Hypertension, 36, (2) pp. 307-315. ISSN 0263-6352 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001902 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Picone DS; Black JA; Dwyer N; Roberts-Thomson P; Sharman JE

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2018Peng X, Schultz MG, Picone DS, Dwyer N, Black JA, et al., 'Non-invasive measurement of reservoir pressure parameters from brachial-cuff blood pressure waveforms', Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 20, (12) pp. 1703-1711. ISSN 1524-6175 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/jch.13411 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Picone DS; Dwyer N; Black JA; Roberts-Thomson P; Sharman JE

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2018Picone DS, Schultz MG, Peng X, Black JA, Dwyer N, et al., 'Discovery of new blood pressure phenotypes and relation to accuracy of cuff devices used in daily clinical practice', Hypertension, 71, (6) pp. 1239-1247. ISSN 0194-911X (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.10696 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Picone DS; Black JA; Dwyer N; Roberts-Thomson P; Sharman JE

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2018Climie RE, Schultz MG, Fell JW, Romero L, Otahal P, et al., 'Central-to-brachial blood pressure amplification in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Journal of Human Hypertension pp. 1-12. ISSN 0950-9240 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41371-018-0124-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Climie RE; Fell JW; Otahal P; Sharman JE

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2018Schultz MG, 'The clinical importance of exercise blood pressure', Artery Research, 21 pp. 58-62. ISSN 1872-9312 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.artres.2017.11.004 [eCite] [Details]

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2018Veloudi P, Blizzard CL, Srikanth VK, Schultz MG, Sharman JE, 'Influence of blood pressure level and age on within-visit blood pressure variability in children and adolescents', European Journal of Pediatrics, 177, (2) pp. 205-210. ISSN 0340-6199 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00431-017-3049-y [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Veloudi P; Blizzard CL; Srikanth VK; Sharman JE

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2018Moore MN, Schultz MG, Nelson MR, Black JA, Dwyer NB, et al., 'Identification of the optimal protocol for automated office blood pressure measurement among patients with treated hypertension', American Journal of Hypertension, 31, (3) pp. 299-304. ISSN 0895-7061 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpx180 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Moore MN; Nelson MR; Black JA; Dwyer NB; Hoban E; Jose MD; Kosmala W; Otahal P; Picone DS; Roberts-Thomson P; Veloudi P; Sharman JE

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2017Kosmala W, Przewlocka-Kosmala M, Sharman JE, Schultz MG, Marwick TH, 'Stability of left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential deformation over time and standard loading conditions', European Heart Journal - Cardiovascular Imaging, 18, (9) pp. 1001-1007. ISSN 2047-2404 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ehjci/jew135 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Kosmala W; Sharman JE; Marwick TH

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2017Peng X, Schultz MG, Picone DS, Black JA, Dwyer N, et al., 'Arterial reservoir characteristics and central-to-peripheral blood pressure amplification in the human upper limb', Journal of Hypertension, 35, (9) pp. 1825-1831. ISSN 0263-6352 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001400 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Picone DS; Black JA; Dwyer N; Roberts-Thomson P; Sharman JE

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2017Picone DS, Schultz MG, Otahal P, Aakhus S, Al-Jumaily AM, et al., 'Accuracy of cuff-measured blood pressure: Systematic reviews and meta-analyses', Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 70, (5) pp. 572-586. ISSN 0735-1097 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.05.064 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 33Web of Science - 36

Co-authors: Picone DS; Otahal P; Black JA; Dwyer N; Roberts-Thomson P; Srikanth VK; Sharman JE

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2017Schultz MG, La Gerche A, Sharman JE, 'Blood pressure response to exercise and cardiovascular disease', Current Hypertension Reports, 19, (11) Article 89. ISSN 1522-6417 (2017) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1007/s11906-017-0787-1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2017Veloudi P, Blizzard CL, Srikanth VK, Breslin M, Schultz MG, et al., 'Age-dependent changes in blood pressure over consecutive office measurements: impact on hypertension diagnosis and implications for international guidelines', Journal of Hypertension, 35, (4) pp. 753-760. ISSN 0263-6352 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000001227 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Veloudi P; Blizzard CL; Srikanth VK; Breslin M; Sharman JE

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2017Callisaya ML, Daly RM, Sharman JE, Bruce D, Davis TME, et al., 'Feasibility of a multi-modal exercise program on cognition in older adults with Type 2 diabetes - a pilot randomised controlled trial', BMC Geriatrics, 17, (1) Article 237. ISSN 1471-2318 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12877-017-0635-9 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Callisaya ML; Sharman JE; Greenaway T; Blizzard L; Srikanth VK

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2016Peng X, Schultz MG, Abhayaratna WP, Stowasser M, Sharman JE, 'Comparison of Central Blood Pressure Estimated by a Cuff-Based Device With Radial Tonometry', American Journal of Hypertension, 29, (10) pp. 1173-1178. ISSN 0895-7061 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpw063 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2016Picone DS, Schultz MG, Climie RED, Srikanth V, Sharman JE, 'Aortic-to-brachial stiffness gradient and kidney function in type 2 diabetes', Journal of Hypertension, 34, (6) pp. 1132-1139. ISSN 0263-6352 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1097/HJH.0000000000000916 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Picone DS; Climie RED; Srikanth V; Sharman JE

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2016Schultz MG, Picone DS, Nikolic SB, Williams AD, Sharman JE, 'Exaggerated blood pressure response to early stages of exercise stress testing and presence of hypertension', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19, (12) pp. 1039-1042. ISSN 1440-2440 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.04.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Picone DS; Nikolic SB; Williams AD; Sharman JE

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2015Schultz MG, Davies JE, Sharman JE, 'Central Blood Pressure Physiology: A (More) Critical Analysis', American Journal of Hypertension, 28, (5) pp. 690-691. ISSN 0895-7061 (2015) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpu238 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2015Schultz MG, Otahal P, Picone DS, Sharman JE, 'Clinical relevance of exaggerated exercise blood pressure', Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 66, (16) pp. 1843-1845. ISSN 0735-1097 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.08.015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Otahal P; Picone DS; Sharman JE

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2015Schultz MG, Hughes AD, Davies JE, Sharman JE, 'Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation', American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 309, (7) pp. H1225-H1233. ISSN 0363-6135 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00317.2015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2014Barlow PA, Otahal P, Schultz MG, Shing CM, Sharman JE, 'Low exercise blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality: Systematic review and meta-analysis', Atherosclerosis, 237, (1) pp. 13-22. ISSN 0021-9150 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.08.029 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Barlow PA; Otahal P; Shing CM; Sharman JE

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2014Costello BT, Schultz MG, Black JA, Sharman JE, 'Evaluation of a Brachial Cuff and Suprasystolic Waveform Algorithm Method to Noninvasively Derive Central Blood Pressure', American Journal of Hypertension, 28, (4) pp. 480-486. ISSN 0895-7061 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpu163 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2014Schultz MG, Climie RED, Sharman JE, 'Ambulatory and central haemodynamics during progressive ascent to high-altitude and associated hypoxia', Journal of Human Hypertension, 28, (12) pp. 705-710. ISSN 0950-9240 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/jhh.2014.15 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Climie RED; Sharman JE

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2014Schultz MG, Davies JE, Hardikar A, Pitt S, Moraldo M, et al., 'Aortic reservoir pressure corresponds to cyclic changes in aortic volume: physiological validation in humans', Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 34, (7) pp. 1597-1603. ISSN 1079-5642 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.114.303573 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 26

Co-authors: Hardikar A; Sharman JE

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2013Schultz MG, Abhayaratna WP, Marwick TH, Sharman JE, 'Myocardial perfusion and the J curve association between diastolic blood pressure and mortality', American Journal of Hypertension, 26, (4) pp. 557-566. ISSN 0895-7061 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hps077 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2013Schultz MG, Climie RED, Nikolic SB, Ahuja KD, Sharman JE, 'Persistent elevation of central pulse pressure during postural stress in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus', Journal of Human Hypertension, 27, (7) pp. 437-444. ISSN 0950-9240 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/jhh.2012.60 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Climie RED; Nikolic SB; Ahuja KD; Sharman JE

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2013Schultz MG, Davies JE, Roberts-Thomson P, Black JA, Hughes AD, et al., 'Exercise central (aortic) blood pressure is predominantly driven by forward traveling waves, not wave reflection', Hypertension, 62, (1) pp. 175-182. ISSN 0194-911X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.111.00584 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 40Web of Science - 38

Co-authors: Sharman JE

Tweet

2013Schultz MG, Davies JE, Roberts-Thomson P, Black JA, Hughes AD, et al., 'Response to A New Exercise Central Hemodynamics Paradigm: Time for Reflection or Expansion?', Hypertension, 62 pp. e1. ISSN 0194-911X (2013) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.113.02142 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2013Schultz MG, Otahal P, Cleland VJ, Blizzard L, Marwick TH, et al., 'Exercise-induced hypertension, cardiovascular events, and mortality in patients undergoing exercise stress testing: a systematic review and meta-analysis', American Journal of Hypertension, 26, (3) pp. 357-366. ISSN 0895-7061 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hps053 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 92Web of Science - 97

Co-authors: Otahal P; Cleland VJ; Blizzard L; Sharman JE

Tweet

2013Schultz MG, Sharman JE, 'Exercise Hypertension', Pulse, 1, (3-4) pp. 161-176. ISSN 2235-8676 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1159/000360975 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2012Climie RED, Schultz MG, Nikolic SB, Ahuja KDK, Fell JW, et al., 'Validity and reliability of central blood pressure estimated by upper arm oscillometric cuff pressure', American Journal of Hypertension, 25, (4) pp. 414-420. ISSN 0895-7061 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ajh.2011.238 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 36Web of Science - 36

Co-authors: Climie RED; Nikolic SB; Ahuja KDK; Fell JW; Sharman JE

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2012Schultz MG, Climie RED, Nikolic SB, Ahuja KD, Sharman JE, 'Reproducibility of cardiac output derived by impedance cardiography during postural changes and exercise', Artery Research, 6, (2) pp. 78-84. ISSN 1872-9312 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.artres.2012.02.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14

Co-authors: Climie RED; Nikolic SB; Ahuja KD; Sharman JE

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2012Schultz MG, Gilroy D, Wright L, Bishop WLJ, Abhayaratna WP, et al., 'Out-of-office and central blood pressure for risk stratification: a cross-sectional study in patients treated for hypertension', European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 42, (4) pp. 393-401. ISSN 1365-2362 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2362.2011.02595.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Sharman JE

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2011Jones G, Schultz MG, Dore D, 'Physical Activity and Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Can MRI Scans Shed More Light on This Issue?', The Physician and Sportsmedicine: A Peer Reviewed Journal of Medical Aspects of Sports, Exercise and Fitness, 39, (3) pp. 55-61. ISSN 0091-3847 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3810/psm.2011.09.1921 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Jones G; Dore D

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2011Schultz MG, Hare JL, Marwick TH, Stowasser M, Sharman JE, 'Masked hypertension is 'unmasked' by low-intensity exercise blood pressure', Blood Pressure, 20, (5) pp. 284-289. ISSN 0803-7051 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3109/08037051.2011.566251 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 37Web of Science - 37

Co-authors: Marwick TH; Sharman JE

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2011Schultz MG, Hordern MD, Leano R, Coombes JS, Marwick TH, et al., 'Lifestyle Change Diminishes a Hypertensive Response to Exercise in Type 2 Diabetes', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43, (5) pp. 764-769. ISSN 0195-9131 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181fcf034 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Marwick TH; Sharman JE

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Conference Publication

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Moore M, Dwyer N, Hoban E, Nelson M, Picone D, et al., 'Optimal automated unobserved office blood pressure protocol: only 6-minutes and two readings may be needed', Artery Research, pp. 71, Vol 16. ISSN 1872-9312 (2016) [Conference Extract]

DOI: 10.1016/j.artres.2016.10.079 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hoban E; Nelson M; Picone D; Sharman J

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2012Climie RE, Schultz MG, Nikolic S, Fell JW, Sharman JE, 'Validity and reliability of a new method to estimate central blood pressure from the upper arm cuff oscillometric signal', From Research to Practice, 19-21 April, Gold Coast, Queensland (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Climie RE; Nikolic S; Fell JW; Sharman JE

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

11

Total funding

$1,084,471

Projects

A smarter way to measure blood pressure (2019)$23,189
Description
Standard cuff blood pressure (BP) measurements have highly variable accuracy. We recently discovered new BP categories that are associated with different risk related to BP. This project aims use information from the BP categories to develop and validate a smart cuff BP method that measures BP more accurately.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($23,189)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Picone DS; Sharman JE; Schultz MG; Black A; Roberts-Thomson P; Dwyer N
Year
2019
Prevalence and cardiovascular risk associated with exaggerated exercise blood pressure among people with type 2 diabetes (2019)$59,958
Description
People with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of death and disability from cardiovascular disease such as heart attack and stroke, for which the main contributing factor is high blood pressure. Since high blood pressure can be treated to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, it is important that people with type 2 diabetes have their blood pressure correctly diagnosed. Pilot data from the investigator team have shown that people with type 2 diabetes have much greater propensity to have an exaggerated (high) blood pressure response to exercise, and this is a cardinal sign of abnormal (high) blood pressure that is missed using standard measurements under resting conditions. This has major implications for the potential of exercise stress test data as a means to identify people at high risk otherwise overlooked. These pilot observations will be confirmed in this current proposal using a nationally representative dataset of 125,000 people, with linkage to cardiovascular hospitalisations and death, in the largest analysis of its kind. Information from this study will inform clinical exercise stress test guidelines to improve care and reduce cardiovascular events among people with type 2 diabetes.
Funding
Diabetes Australia Research Program ($59,958)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sharman JE; Schultz MG; La Gerche A
Year
2019
CArdiac REhabilitation for the Secondary prevention of Stroke (CARESS) (2018)$10,000
Description
Most strokes are caused by common modifiable risk factors including hypertension, smoking, overweight and physical inactivity. The management of these risk factors is paramount for reducing likelihood of further cardiovascular events. Current treatment guidelines state that a general practitioner should manage the prevention of another stroke. Our own research shows that the management of risk factors is currently suboptimal, with few stroke survivors having well controlled hypertension, many continuing to smoke, most being inactive and many having suboptimal pharmacotherapies.Our overall aim is to improve the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in people who have suffered stroke through the use of an adapted cardiac rehabilitation program. These programs are known to reduce recurrent cardiac events in a cost-effective way. The aims of this particular study are to:1. Adapt the current Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH) cardiac rehabilitation program for use in stroke patients by observing and mapping the current program and holding a workshop with stroke clinicians, nurses and rehabilitation specialists, as well as stroke survivors and their carers to adapt the program to their needs; 2. Run a pilot of the adapted cardiac rehabilitation program in a group of stroke patients to examine its feasibility, acceptability and effect on cardiovascular risk factors and health-related quality of life.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-Starter
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Gall SL; Callisaya M; Schultz MG; Sahle B; Castley H
Year
2018
The EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (EXERTION) (2018)$22,500
Description
The EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (EXERTION) aims to data-link clinicalexercise testing results to cardiovascular disease outcomes, to provide the first-ever evidencebasedthresholds for abnormal exercise blood pressure. Results will inform clinical guidelines,providing supervising clinicians with signposts of cardiovascular risk upon which to optimisepatient management and follow-up care.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($22,500)
Scheme
Grant- Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG
Year
2018
EXERTION: the EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (2016 - 2019)$314,644
Description
A clinical exercise stress test (XST) is a common diagnostic test performed on >400,000 patients in Australia each year. Measurement of blood pressure (BP) is a mandatory component of the test. Doctors have long suspected that exaggerated (hyper-) or abnormally low (hypo-) BP responses to exercise are poor prognostic signs, and in a series of studies published during my PhD and early career, I have shown that exercise BP provides information about cardiovascular (CV) risk above and beyond resting BP. Specifically that; 1)exercise hypertension reveals BP abnormalities not detectable at rest.2)exercise hypertension independently predicts future sustained hypertension.3)exercise hypertension and exercise hypotension independently predict CV events and mortality.Despite this knowledge, there remains no clear guidance for doctors because there are no evidence-based reference values for abnormal exercise BP (hyper- and hypo-responses). This needs to be determined from large, widely-representative data sources linked to clinical outcomes. This is the overarching goal of the EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (EXERTION), a world-first, national, multi-centre collaborative study which I will lead over the next four years as part of my early career fellowship. EXERTION is designed to fill specific clinical evidence gaps, enabling better identification of high-risk individuals from abnormal XST responses. Knowledge gained will inform clinical guidelines and lead to improved patient care.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($314,644)
Scheme
Fellowship-Early Career
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG
Period
2016 - 2019
Grant Reference
1104731
The EXERcise stress Test collaboratION - Pilot study (2016)$55,519
Description
Data-linkage study investigating CV outcomes in relation to exercise stress testing, derivation of exercise BP thresholds.
Funding
National Heart Foundation ($55,519)
Scheme
Grant-Vanguard
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG; Sharman JE; Marwick TH; Venn A
Year
2016
Linking exercise blood pressure to clinical outcomes: the EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (EXERTION) Tasmanian pilot study. (2016)$10,000
Description
The EXERcise stress Test collaboratION (EXERTION) aims to link clinical exercise testing results to cardiovascular disease outcomes, to provide the first-ever evidence-based thresholds for abnormal exercise blood pressure. Results will inform clinical guidelines, providing supervising clinicians with signposts of cardiovascular risk upon which to optimise patient management and follow-up care.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-Starter
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG; Sharman JE; Venn A; Marwick TH; Thomson PR
Year
2016
Improved cardiovascular Disease hEALth service delivery in Australia (the IDEAL study) (2016 - 2018)$429,678
Description
This program will establish and test the clinical value of a health service method to deliver patient information on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk to general practitioners. This new method to measure and report absolute CVD risk will be developed within Tasmanian Pathology Services and tested by clinical-trial with linkage to CVD outcomes.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($429,678)
Scheme
Grant - Project Grant Funding
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sharman JE; Schultz MG; Marwick TH; Thomson PR
Period
2016 - 2018
The UNMASK Blood Pressure Study (2014 - 2015)$150,000
Description
Each year, millions of people worldwide perform exercise stress tests, which typically involve a series of compulsory blood pressure recordings. If a person is found to have high blood pressure (BP) during the exercise test, it is noted by doctors as an abnormal response, but nothing further may be done. Recent research studies show that high exercise BP is clinically important, and may signify increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, it has shown that this elevated cardiovasular disease risk may be due to an underlying or 'masked' hypertension. Masked hypertension is a common condition that is not readily detectible via routine clinic BP assessment. Because it can occur in individuals with apparent normal clinic BP, many cases may go undiagnosed. The aim of this study is to determine whether a person who has high exercise BP, also has high BP when measured out of the clinic. If this is the case, then the BP response to exercise (from a test that is already being undertaken as part of routine care) may be used to screen for people who are at elevated risk related to BP. This exercise BP information may be used to alter the way that these people are clinically managed. This unique study is expected to be of major importance in the clinical management of hypertension.
Funding
National Heart Foundation ($150,000)
Scheme
Fellowship-Postdoctoral
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG
Period
2014 - 2015
Assessing the validity on non-invasive methods to estimate central blood pressure (BP) (2014)$6,983
Description
The prognostic and clinical importance of central BP beyond conventional brachial blood pressure (BP) measurement has recently been demonstrated. However, assessment of central BP is largely confined to a research setting, because current, non-invasive methods to assess central BP are impractical for routine clinical use. The objective of this research program is to determine (and refine where necessary) the accuracy (validity) of two relatively new upper-arm 'cuff' devices to estimate central BP. In doing so, it is envisioned that our results may enable a wider clinical application of central BP, of which measurement may result in a more accurate assessment of CV risk related to high BP.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($6,983)
Scheme
Grant-Starter
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG; Dwyer N; Black A; Roberts-Thomson P; Sharman JE
Year
2014
Annual Scientific Meeting for the European Association for Research into Arterial Structure and Physiology, Paris, France, 2011 (2011)$2,000
Funding
National Heart Foundation ($2,000)
Scheme
Grant-Travel
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Schultz MG
Year
2011

Research Supervision

Current

4

Completed

3

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDImproved Cardiovascular Disease hEALth Service Delivery in Australia (IDEAL study)2016
PhDImproved Cardiovascular Disease hEALth Service Delivery in Australia (IDEAL Study)2016
PhDMeasurement and Clinical Utility of Central Blood Pressure2016
PhDExercise Physiology in the Identification and Control of High Blood Pressure: the EPIC-BP study2018

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDNon-Invasive Reservoir Pressure Parameters: Measurement and clinical relevance
Candidate: Xiaoqing Peng
2019
PhDAccurate Blood Pressure Measurement
Candidate: Dean Stewart Picone
2018
PhDBlood Pressure Variability: Measurement and clinical implications
Candidate: Panagiota Veloudi
2017