Profiles

Verity Cleland

UTAS Home Associate Professor Verity Cleland

Verity Cleland

Associate Professor, Public Health

Room 362c-01 , MS2

+61 3 6226 4603 (phone)

verity.cleland@utas.edu.au

A/Prof Verity Cleland at the Menzies Institute for Medical Research investigates the factors that lead some people to adopt healthy physical activity behaviours while others do not.

It is well known that physical activity is good for our health. For example, it helps to control the risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, it reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, it promotes healthy growth and development in children, and it can improve self-esteem and combat depression.

Despite this, around half of Australian adults do not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines and this has remained largely unchanged since the 1980s.

Associate Professor Cleland is a behavioural epidemiologist and, in her research, she uses a number of methods to study people’s behaviour – surveys, one-on-one interviews, focus group meetings and devices like pedometers to get accurate data about people’s movements as they go about their day.

Her findings show that a mix of individual, social and environmental factors influence a person’s level of physical activity. ‘Individual factors include the person’s self-confidence and skills in areas such as goal-setting, planning and time management. Social factors include the positive and negative influence of family members, work colleagues and other peer groups, but also access to childcare and other forms of support. Environmental factors cover the built and natural environment in which the person lives and include everything from the quality of the footpaths to perceptions of crime in the neighbourhood.’

The impact of these factors varies from person to person but there are some clear trends. ‘We’ve found that particular groups in the community are at a higher risk of inactivity – women, people experiencing socio-economic disadvantage and people living in rural areas.’

There also appear to be stages in a person’s life when they are vulnerable to inactivity. ‘Leaving school, starting a family and retiring from work are times of change when healthy routines and support networks can be disrupted. Our research shows it may be an important time to promote health messages to support people going through these transitions.’

A/Prof Cleland’s work goes beyond understanding the determinants of physical activity. She also studies strategies to change behaviour and how those strategies can be most effective. ‘Changing behaviours is not easy, and our research shows no single strategy will solve the problem of physical inactivity.’

Strategies to promote physical activity have traditionally focused on what people do in their leisure time, things like exercise, sport and recreation. But, when people are busy or stressed, these activities are often the first to go. ‘Supporting people to make physical activity a normal part of their daily routine is likely to be more sustainable in the long run – for example, the way they get to work and to school, and how they do the shopping and other daily tasks.’

A/Prof Cleland is passionate about applying her findings to the way we build our cities and how we provide public services. Working with Hobart’s public bus service, Metro Tasmania, the Department of Health and the Local Government Association of Tasmania, she is leading a study, known as Health by Stealth, to find the most effective ways to encourage people to use public and active transport.

‘Using public transport reduces traffic congestion and air pollution, but public transport users also do up to 33 minutes per day more physical activity than car drivers.’

The study will look at incentive programs and how transport services can better meet the needs of users. ‘We want to make the healthy choice the easy choice.’

A/Prof Cleland sees many advantages in working in Tasmania. ‘A lot of research on the built environment is done in big cities like Sydney and New York and London. Tasmania has some unique features like its low population density, its topography and the very different mix of public transport and urban infrastructure.

‘Doing the kind of work I do, I’m also really fortunate that the Menzies Institute has earned the trust of the community. People are open to participating in the research. They really want to contribute.’

A/Prof Cleland’s expertise saw her appointed as Deputy Chair of the Tasmanian Premier’s Health and Wellbeing Advisory Committee, which works to develop strategies to support healthy behaviours. ‘It’s incredibly rewarding to know my research will influence decisions about government policies, spending decisions and infrastructure design, and make a positive impact out in the real world.’

Verity Cleland is an Associate Professor at the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania. She is behavioural epidemiologist with a background in health promotion, and her main research interest is in understanding and promoting physical activity.

Her work has often focused on groups at high risk of inactivity including women, those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage and rural communities. Two current projects include a NHMRC Partnership Project (2018-2021) to better understand and change active and public transport behaviours in Tasmania (Health by Stealth), and a Medical Research Future Fund project focusing on understanding and measuring walkability in rural communities using a citizen science approach (Communities for Walkability).

These projects involve partnerships with local agencies including Metro Tasmania, the Tasmanian Department of Health (Public Health Services), and the Local Government Association of Tasmania. Verity is Chair of the Tasmanian Active Living Coalition, and Deputy Chair of the Tasmanian Premier’s Health and Wellbeing Advisory Committee, which has a major focus on working inter-sectorally and inter-departmentally to create environments that support healthy behaviours.

Through these committees, her collaborative research projects, and her history of partnerships in research, she is well-connected with a range of stakeholders in Tasmania and Australia.

Biography

Associate Professor Cleland’s PhD was undertaken at the Menzies Research Institute (now Menzies Institute for Medical Research), University of Tasmania, where she was involved in the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study, a 20-follow up of the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey.

A/Prof Cleland's thesis explored the role of physical activity and changes in physical activity from childhood into adulthood in relation to the maintenance of a healthy weight. She was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research (now the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition), Deakin University, from 2007-2010, where her work focused on understanding influences on women and children’s physical activity behaviour.

In 2010 she relocated to the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, where she was a NHMRC Postdoctoral Fellow, and continued her work in understanding and promoting physical activity among women, particularly those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage. A/Prof Cleland has been awarded two Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowships (2016-2024) to continue her work on active and public transport.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Tasmania, Australia, 2007. Thesis: What is the role of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in maintaining a healthy weight from childhood into adulthood?
  • BAppSc (Health Promotion) (1st Class Hons), Deakin University, Australia, 2000. Thesis: Exploring the meaning of health promotion in the primary school community: A case study

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Deputy Chair, Tasmanian Premier’s Health and Wellbeing Advisory Council
  • Member, Australasian Society of Behavioural Health and Medicine
  • Member, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

Research Appointments

A/Prof Cleland is the Deputy Chair of the Tasmanian Premier’s Health and Wellbeing Advisory Council. She was a member and Deputy Chair of the Tasmanian Premier's Physical Activity Council, and has been an advisor for the Heart Foundation (Tasmania), and the Tasmanian state departments of Police and Emergency Medicine and of Education.

View more on AssocProf Verity Cleland in WARP

Expertise

  • Behavioural epidemiology
  • Physical activity
  • Active travel
  • Partnerships
  • Public health
  • Health promotion

Research Themes

A/Prof Cleland’s research aligns with the Better Health theme. She is primarily involved in population-based longitudinal observational studies, but also uses qualitative research techniques to investigate her research questions. Within a behavioural epidemiological framework, her work is focused on understanding, measuring and promoting physical activity among population groups at high risk of physical inactivity and subsequently poor health. These groups include women, those experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage, those living in rural areas and children. A/Prof Cleland's work aims to understand how individual (e.g. self-efficacy, intentions, enjoyment), social (e.g. social support from family/friends) and environmental (e.g. safety, aesthetics, walkability) factors influence physical activity in these population groups, and to use these findings to inform the development of strategies to promote physical activity.

Collaboration

A/Prof Cleland collaborates with researchers from Deakin University’s Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, the University of Sydney’s Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies and Menzies Centre for Health Policy and Economics, the University of South Australia’s School of Health Sciences, and RMIT University’s Centre for Urban Research

Awards

A/Prof Cleland has won numerous awards for her research, including an Australian Institute of Policy and Science Tasmanian Young Tall Poppy Science Award (2011), the University of Tasmania Vice-Chancellor's Award for Early Career Research Excellence (2010), and a Paul Dudley White (2019) International Scholar Award at the American Heart Association Epi Lifestyle conference.

Fields of Research

  • Epidemiology (420299)
  • Health promotion (420603)
  • Preventative health care (420605)
  • Health services and systems (420399)
  • Cardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases) (320101)
  • Sports science and exercise (420799)
  • Paediatrics (321399)
  • Health and community services (420305)
  • Podiatry (420107)
  • Health counselling (420307)
  • Primary health care (420319)
  • Exercise physiology (420702)
  • Social change (441004)
  • Mental health services (420313)
  • Recreation, leisure and tourism geography (440608)
  • Disease surveillance (420202)
  • Sport and exercise nutrition (321006)
  • Land use and environmental planning (330404)
  • Nutrition and dietetics (321099)
  • Sociology (441099)
  • Behavioural epidemiology (420201)
  • Rural sociology (441003)
  • Community child health (420601)
  • Tourist behaviour and visitor experience (350806)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander public health and wellbeing (450417)
  • Applied sociology, program evaluation and social impact assessment (441001)
  • Sports medicine (320225)
  • Public health (420699)
  • Health equity (420602)

Research Objectives

  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Clinical health (200199)
  • Preventive medicine (200412)
  • Rural and remote area health (200508)
  • Health education and promotion (200203)
  • Public health (excl. specific population health) (200499)
  • Nutrition (200410)
  • Expanding knowledge in the health sciences (280112)
  • Neonatal and child health (200506)
  • Evaluation of health outcomes (200202)
  • Health inequalities (200204)
  • Health protection and disaster response (200406)
  • Social structure and health (200207)
  • Women's and maternal health (200509)
  • Expanding knowledge in human society (280123)
  • Other health (209999)
  • Sport, exercise and recreation (130699)
  • Mental health (200409)
  • Terrestrial biodiversity (180606)
  • Prevention of human diseases and conditions (200104)
  • Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) (200599)
  • Exercise (130601)
  • Recreational services (119902)
  • Health policy evaluation (200205)
  • Organised sports (130602)
  • Health status (incl. wellbeing) (200407)

Publications

Total publications

95

Journal Article

(85 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Fraser BJ, Alishah Z, Magnussen CG, Venn AJ, Dwyer T, et al., 'Factors associated with change and stability in adherence to muscle-strengthening guidelines among young Australian adults: A longitudinal study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport Article online ahead of publication. ISSN 1440-2440 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2021.07.007 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fraser BJ; Magnussen CG; Venn AJ

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2021Melwani S, Cleland V, Patterson K, Nash R, 'A scoping review: global health literacy interventions for pregnant women and mothers with young children', Health Promotion International pp. 1-35. ISSN 0957-4824 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daab047 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Melwani S; Patterson K; Nash R

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2020Cleland V, Cocker F, Canary J, Teychenne M, Crawford D, et al., 'Social-ecological predictors of physical activity patterns: a longitudinal study of women from socioeconomically disadvantaged areas', Preventive Medicine, 132 pp. 1-7. ISSN 0091-7435 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2020.105995 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cocker F

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2020Cleland V, Nash M, Claflin S, Sharman MJ, 'Authors' Response to the Letter to the Editor: Parkrun and the Claim of 'Elitism' in Paid-Entry Run/Walk Events', American Journal of Health Promotion ISSN 0890-1171 (2020) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1177/0890117120920446 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Nash M; Claflin S; Sharman MJ

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2020Cleland V, Timperio A, Sharman M, Dollman J, 'Test-retest reliability of a self-reported physical activity environment instrument for use in rural settings', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 28 pp. 168-179. ISSN 1038-5282 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ajr.12625 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman M

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2020Crisford P, Aitken D, Winzenberg T, Venn A, Cleland V, 'What factors are associated with physical activity promotion in the podiatry setting? a cross-sectional study', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport pp. 1-7. ISSN 1440-2440 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.08.008 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Crisford P; Aitken D; Winzenberg T; Venn A

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2020Fraser BJ, Blizzard L, Cleland V, Schmidt MD, Smith KJ, et al., 'Factors associated with persistently high muscular power from childhood to adulthood', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 52, (1) pp. 49-55. ISSN 1530-0315 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002108 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Fraser BJ; Blizzard L; Smith KJ; Gall SL; Dwyer T; Venn AJ; Magnussen CG

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2020Fraser BJ, Blizzard L, Cleland V, Schmidt MD, Smith KJ, et al., 'Factors associated with muscular fitness phenotypes in Australian children: a cross-sectional study', Journal of Sports Sciences, 38, (1) pp. 38-45. ISSN 0264-0414 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2019.1679575 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Fraser BJ; Blizzard L; Smith KJ; Gall SL; Dwyer T; Venn AJ; Magnussen CG

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2020Morris KA, Arundell L, Cleland V, Teychenne M, 'Social ecological factors associated with physical activity and screen time amongst mothers from disadvantaged neighbourhoods over three years', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 17, (1) Article 110. ISSN 1479-5868 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12966-020-01015-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

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2020Patterson KAE, Ferrar K, Gall SL, Venn A, Blizzard L, et al., 'Cluster patterns of behavioural risk factors among children: longitudinal associations with adult cardio-metabolic risk factors', Preventive Medicine, 130 Article 105861. ISSN 0091-7435 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.105861 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Patterson KAE; Gall SL; Venn A; Blizzard L; Dwyer T

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2020Ragaini BS, Sharman MJ, Lyth A, Jose KA, Blizzard L, et al., 'A mixed-methods study of the demographic and behavioural correlates of walking to a more distant bus stop', Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, 6 Article 100164. ISSN 2590-1982 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.trip.2020.100164 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4

Co-authors: Ragaini BS; Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Blizzard L; Peterson C; Johnston FH; Palmer AJ; Aryal J

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2020Sharman MJ, Ball K, Greaves S, Jose KA, Morse M, et al., 'trips4health: Protocol of a single-blinded randomised controlled trial incentivising adults to use public transport for physical activity gain', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 19 Article 100619. ISSN 2451-8654 (2020) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1016/j.conctc.2020.100619 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Blizzard CL; Wells G; Venn AJ; Palmer AJ; Harpus S

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2020Sharman MJ, Ball K, Greaves S, Jose KA, Morse M, et al., 'trips4health: Protocol of a single-blinded randomised controlled trial incentivising adults to use public transport for physical activity gain', Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 19 Article 100619. ISSN 2451-8654 (2020) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1016/j.conctc.2020.100619 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Blizzard CL; Wells G; Venn AJ; Palmer AJ; Harpur S

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2020Sharman MJ, Jose KA, Tian J, Venn AJ, Canary J, et al., 'Childhood factors related to diverging body mass index trajectories from childhood into mid-adulthood: A mixed methods study', Social Science and Medicine, 270 pp. 1-10. ISSN 0277-9536 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.113460 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Tian J; Venn AJ; Banks S; Ayton J

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2020Stanesby O, Long M, Ball K, Blizzard L, Cocker F, et al., 'Socio-demographic, behavioural and health-related characteristics associated with active commuting in a regional Australian state: evidence from the 2016 Tasmanian Population Health Survey', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, (September) pp. 1-12. ISSN 2201-1617 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/hpja.428 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Stanesby O; Blizzard L; Cocker F; Johnston F; Jose K; Palmer AJ; Sharman M; Venn A

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2020Tian J, Smith KJ, Cleland V, Gall S, Dwyer T, et al., 'Partnering and parenting transitions in Australian men and women: associations with changes in weight, domain-specific physical activity and sedentary behaviours', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 17, (1) Article 87. ISSN 1479-5868 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12966-020-00989-6 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Tian J; Smith KJ; Gall S; Dwyer T; Venn AJ

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2019Cleland V, Nash M, Sharman MJ, Claflin S, 'Exploring the health-promoting potential of the 'parkrun' phenomenon: What factors are associated with higher levels of participation?', American Journal of Health Promotion, 33, (1) pp. 13-23. ISSN 0890-1171 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/0890117118770106 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Nash M; Sharman MJ; Claflin S

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2019Sharman MJ, Jose KA, Venn AJ, Banks S, Ayton J, et al., ''I love having a healthy lifestyle' - a qualitative study investigating body mass index trajectories from childhood to mid-adulthood', BMC Obesity, 6 pp. 1-10. ISSN 2052-9538 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s40608-019-0239-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Venn AJ; Banks S; Ayton J

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2019Sharman MJ, Lyth A, Jose KA, Ragaini BS, Blizzard L, et al., 'Acceptability and perceived feasibility of strategies to increase public transport use for physical activity gain - a mixed methods study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia pp. 1-14. ISSN 2201-1617 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/hpja.292 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Jose KA; Ragaini BS; Blizzard L; Johnston FH; Peterson C; Palmer AJ

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2019Sharman MJ, Nash M, Cleland V, 'Health and broader community benefit of parkrun - An exploratory qualitative study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 30, (2) pp. 163-171. ISSN 1036-1073 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/hpja.182 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Sharman MJ; Nash M

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2018Cleland VJ, Patterson K, Breslin M, Schmidt MD, Dwyer T, et al., 'Longitudinal associations between TV viewing and BMI not explained by the 'mindless eating' or 'physical activity displacement' hypotheses among adults', BMC Public Health, 18, (1) Article 797. ISSN 1471-2458 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12889-018-5674-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Patterson K; Breslin M; Venn AJ

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2018Crisford P, Winzenberg T, Venn A, Schultz M, Aitken D, et al., 'Factors associated with physical activity promotion by allied and other non-medical health professionals: a systematic review', Patient Education and Counseling, 101, (10) pp. 1775-1785. ISSN 0738-3991 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2018.05.011 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9

Co-authors: Crisford P; Winzenberg T; Venn A; Schultz M; Aitken D

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2018Fletcher EA, McNaughton SA, Crawford D, Cleland V, Della Gatta J, et al., 'Associations between sedentary behaviours and dietary intakes among adolescents', Public Health Nutrition, 21, (6) pp. 1115-1122. ISSN 1368-9800 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1017/S136898001700372X [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17

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2017Cleland V, Squibb K, Stephens L, Dalby J, Timperio A, et al., 'Effectiveness of interventions to promote physical activity and/or decrease sedentary behaviour among rural adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 18, (7) pp. 727-741. ISSN 1467-7881 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/obr.12533 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 18

Co-authors: Squibb K; Winzenberg T

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2017Patterson KAE, Gall SL, Venn AJ, Otahal P, Blizzard L, et al., 'Accumulated exposure to rural areas of residence over the life course is associated with overweight and obesity in adulthood: a 25-year prospective cohort study', Annals of Epidemiology, 27, (3) pp. 169-175. ISSN 1047-2797 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.01.007 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Patterson KAE; Gall SL; Venn AJ; Otahal P; Blizzard L; Dwyer T

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2017Smith KJ, Gall SL, McNaughton SA, Cleland VJ, Otahal P, et al., 'Lifestyle behaviours associated with 5-year weight gain in a prospective cohort of Australian adults aged 26-36 years at baseline', BMC Public Health, 17, (1) Article 54. ISSN 1471-2458 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12889-016-3931-y [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Smith KJ; Gall SL; Otahal P; Dwyer T; Venn AJ

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2017Veitch J, Carver A, Salmon J, Abbott G, Ball K, et al., 'What predicts children's active transport and independent mobility in disadvantaged neighborhoods?', Health & Place, 44 pp. 103-109. ISSN 1353-8292 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.02.003 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 32Web of Science - 33

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2015Cleland V, Hughes C, Thornton L, Squibb K, Venn A, et al., 'Environmental barriers and enablers to physical activity participation among rural adults: A qualitative study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 26, (2) pp. 99-104. ISSN 1036-1073 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/HE14115 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Hughes C; Squibb K; Venn A

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2015Cleland V, Hughes C, Thornton L, Venn A, Squibb K, et al., 'A qualitative study of environmental factors important for physical activity in rural adults', PLoS One, 10, (11) Article e0140659. ISSN 1932-6203 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0140659 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 21Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Hughes C; Venn A; Squibb K

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2015Cleland V, Sodergren M, Otahal P, Timperio A, Ball K, et al., 'Associations between the perceived environment and physical activity among adults aged 55-65 years: Does urban-rural area of residence matter?', Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 23, (1) pp. 55-63. ISSN 1063-8652 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1123/JAPA.2012-0271 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Otahal P

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2015Crawford D, Ball K, Cleland V, Thornton L, Abbott G, et al., 'Maternal efficacy and sedentary behavior rules predict child obesity resilience', BMC Obesity, 2 Article 26. ISSN 2052-9538 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s40608-015-0057-1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3

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2014Cleland V, Schmidt M, Salmon J, Dywer T, Venn A, 'Combined associations of sitting time and physical activity with obesity in young adults', Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11, (1) pp. 136-144. ISSN 1543-3080 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1123/jpah.2011-0143 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Venn A

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2014Lioret S, McNaughton SA, Cameron AJ, Crawford D, Campbell KJ, et al., 'Three-year change in diet quality and associated changes in BMI among schoolchildren living in socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods', The British Journal of Nutrition: An International Journal of Nutritional Science, 112, (2) pp. 260-268. ISSN 0007-1145 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114514000749 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16

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2014Patterson KAE, Cleland V, Venn A, Blizzard L, Gall S, 'A cross-sectional study of geographic differences in health risk factors among young Australian adults: The role of socioeconomic position', Bmc Public Health, 14 Article 1278. ISSN 1471-2458 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1278 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 19

Co-authors: Patterson KAE; Venn A; Blizzard L; Gall S

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2013Cleland V, Ball K, 'What might work? Exploring the perceived feasibility of strategies to promote physical activity among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods', Health Education Research, 28, (2) pp. 205-219. ISSN 1465-3648 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/her/cys097 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

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2013Cleland V, Granados A, Crawford D, Winzenberg T, Ball K, 'Effectiveness of interventions to promote physical activity among socioeconomically disadvantaged women: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, 14, (3) pp. 197-212. ISSN 1467-7881 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2012.01058.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 36Web of Science - 32

Co-authors: Winzenberg T

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2013Cleland V, McNeilly B, Crawford D, Ball K, 'Obesity prevention programs and policies: Practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of feasibility and effectiveness', Obesity, 21, (9) pp. E448-E455. ISSN 1930-7381 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/oby.20172 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9

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2013Cleland VJ, Ball K, Crawford D, 'Is a perceived supportive physical environment important for self-reported leisure time physical activity among socioeconomically disadvantaged women with poor psychosocial characteristics? An observational study', BMC Public Health, 13, (280) pp. 1-8. ISSN 1471-2458 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-280 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6

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2013Crisford P, Winzenberg T, Venn A, Cleland V, 'Understanding the physical activity promotion behaviours of podiatrists: a qualitative study', Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 6, (37 (September)) pp. 1-10. ISSN 1757-1146 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1757-1146-6-37 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Crisford P; Winzenberg T; Venn A

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2013Jose KA, Cleland VJ, Venn AJ, Hansen E, 'Young adult perceptions of Australia's physical activity recommendations for adults', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 24, (3) pp. 199-205. ISSN 1036-1073 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/HE13041 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jose KA; Venn AJ; Hansen E

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2013Salmon J, Veitch J, Abbott G, ChinAPaw M, Brug JJ, et al., 'Are associations between the perceived home and neighbourhood environment and children's physical activity and sedentary behaviour moderated by urban/rural location?', Health and Place, 24 pp. 44-53. ISSN 1353-8292 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2013.07.010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 30Web of Science - 32

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2013Schultz MG, Otahal P, Cleland VJ, Blizzard L, Marwick TH, et al., 'Exercise-induced hypertension, cardiovascular events, and mortality in patients undergoing exercise stress testing: a systematic review and meta-analysis', American Journal of Hypertension, 26, (3) pp. 357-366. ISSN 0895-7061 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hps053 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 126Web of Science - 136

Co-authors: Schultz MG; Otahal P; Blizzard L; Sharman JE

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2013Smith KJ, McNaughton SA, Cleland VJ, Crawford D, Ball K, 'Health, Behavioral, Cognitive, and Social Correlates of Breakfast Skipping among Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighborhoods', Journal of Nutrition, 143, (11) pp. 1774-1784. ISSN 0022-3166 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3945/jn.113.181396 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Smith KJ

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2013Sun C, Pezic A, Tikellis G, Ponsonby A-L, Wake M, et al., 'Effects of school-based interventions for direct delivery of physical activity on fitness and cardiometabolic markers in children and adolescents: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials', Obesity Reviews, 14, (10) pp. 818-838. ISSN 1467-7881 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/obr.12047 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 39Web of Science - 42

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2013Williams LK, Andrianopoulos N, Cleland V, Crawford D, Ball K, 'Associations between education and personal income with body mass index among Australian women residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods', American Journal of Health Promotion, 28, (1) pp. 59-65. ISSN 0890-1171 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.4278/ajhp.120316-QUAN-143 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6

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2012Ball K, Abbott G, Cleland V, Timperio A, Thornton L, et al., 'Resilience to obesity amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged women: the READI study', International Journal of Obesity, 36, (6) pp. 855-865. ISSN 0307-0565 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2011.183 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 40Web of Science - 37

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2012Ball K, Cleland V, Salmon J, Timperio AF, McNaughton S, et al., 'Cohort profile: the resilience for eating and activity despite inequality (READI) study', International Journal of Epidemiology, 42, (6) pp. 1629-1639. ISSN 1464-3685 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ije/dys165 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 35Web of Science - 38

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2012Cleland V, Ball K, Crawford D, 'Socioeconomic position and physical activity among women in Melbourne, Australia: Does the use of different socioeconomic indicators matter?', Social Science & Medicine, 74, (10) pp. 1578-1583. ISSN 0277-9536 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.031 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13

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2012Cleland V, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Which domains of childhood physical activity predict physical activity in adulthood? A 20-year prospective tracking study', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 46 pp. 595-602. ISSN 1473-0480 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2011-090508 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 60Web of Science - 56

Co-authors: Venn A

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2012Cleland VJ, Ball K, King AC, Crawford D, 'Do the individual, social, and environmental correlates of physical activity differ between urban and rural women? ', Environment and Behavior, 44, (3) pp. 350-373. ISSN 0013-9165 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/0013916510393275 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 15

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2012Thornton LE, Crawford DA, Cleland VJ, Timperio AF, Abbott G, et al., 'Do food and physical activity environments vary between disadvantaged urban and rural areas? Findings from the READI Study', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 23, (2) pp. 153-156. ISSN 1036-1073 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/HE12153 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17

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2011Azar D, Ball K, Salmon J, Cleland V, 'Individual, social and physical environmental correlates of physical activity among young women at risk of depression', Journal of Physical Activity & Health , 8 pp. 133-140. ISSN 1543-3080 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1123/jpah.8.1.133 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3

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2011Cleland V, Timperio A, Salmon J, Hume C, Telford A, et al., 'A longitudinal study of the family environment and youth physical activity', American Journal of Health Promotion, 25 pp. 159-167. ISSN 0890-1171 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.4278/ajhp.090303-QUAN-93 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 83Web of Science - 88

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2011Cleland VJ, Schmidt MD, Salmon J, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Correlates of pedometer-measured and self-reported physical activity among young Australian adults', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 14, (6) pp. 496-503. ISSN 1440-2440 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2011.04.006 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Schmidt MD; Venn A

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2011Crawford DA, Ball K, Cleland VJ, Campbell KJ, Timperio AF, et al., 'Home and neighbourhood correlates of BMI among children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods ', British Journal of Nutrition, 107, (7) pp. 1028-1036. ISSN 0007-1145 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1017/S0007114511003801 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25

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2011Magnussen CG, Thomson R, Cleland VJ, Ukoumunne OC, Dwyer T, et al., 'Factors Affecting the Stability of Blood Lipid and Lipoprotein Levels From Youth to Adulthood: Evidence from the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study', Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 165, (1) pp. 68-76. ISSN 1072-4710 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.246 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 34Web of Science - 29

Co-authors: Magnussen CG; Thomson R; Venn A

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2010Azar D, Ball K, Salmon J, Cleland V, 'Physical activity correlates in young women with depressive symptoms: a qualitative study', The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 7, (3) pp. 2-11. ISSN 1479-5868 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-7-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21

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2010Ball K, Cleland V, Timperio A, Salmon J, Giles-Corti B, et al., 'Love thy neighbour? Associations of social capital and crime with physical activity amongst women', Social Science & Medicine, 71, (4) pp. 807-814. ISSN 0277-9536 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.04.041 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 89Web of Science - 82

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2010Cleland V, Ball K, 'Recruiting hard-to-reach populations: lessons from a study of women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas of Victoria, Australia', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 21, (3) pp. 243-244. ISSN 1036-1073 (2010) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1071/HE10243 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9

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2010Cleland V, Ball K, Hume C, Timperio A, King A, et al., 'Individual, social and environmental correlates of physical activity among women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods', Social Science & Medicine, 70, (12) pp. 2011-2018. ISSN 0277-9536 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.02.028 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 91Web of Science - 88

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2010Cleland V, Ball K, Salmon J, Timperio A, Crawford D, 'Personal, social and environmental determinants of resilience to physical inactivity amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged women', Health Education Research: Theory and Practice, 25, (2) pp. 268-281. ISSN 0268-1153 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/her/cyn054 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25

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2010Cleland V, Hume C, Crawford D, Timperio A, Hesketh K, et al., 'Urban-rural comparison of weight status among women and children living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods', Medical Journal of Australia, 192, (3) pp. 137-140. ISSN 0025-729X (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2010.tb03451.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 38Web of Science - 36

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2010Cleland V, Timperio A, Salmon J, Hume C, Baur LA, et al., 'Predictors of time spent outdoors among children: 5-year longitudinal findings', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 64, (5) pp. 400-406. ISSN 0143-005X (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1136/jech.2009.087460 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 69Web of Science - 66

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2010Cleland V, Venn A, 'Encouraging Physical Activity And Discouraging Sedentary Behaviour In Adolescents', Journal of Adolescent Health, 47, (3) pp. 221-222. ISSN 1054-139X (2010) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.06.022 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Venn A

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2010Crawford D, Cleland V, Timperio A, Salmon J, Andrianopolous N, et al., 'The longitudinal influence of home and neighbourhood environments on children's physical activity and adiposity over five years: the CLAN study', International Journal of Obesity: and Related Metabolic Disorders, 34, (7) pp. 1177-1187. ISSN 0307-0565 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2010.57 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 108Web of Science - 105

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2009Ball K, Cleland V, Timperio A, Salmon J, Crawford D, 'Socioeconomic position and children's physical activity and sedentary behaviours: Longitudinal findings from the CLAN study', Journal of Physical Activity & Health , 6, (3) pp. 289-298. ISSN 1543-3080 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1123/jpah.6.3.289 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 50Web of Science - 48

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2009Cleland V, Ball K, Magnussen CG, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'In Reply: Cleland et al Respond to 'Physical activity over the life course: whose behavior changes, when and why?'', American Journal of Epidemiology, 170 pp. 1082-1083. ISSN 0002-9262 (2009) [Letter or Note in Journal]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Magnussen CG; Venn A

2009Cleland VJ, Ball K, Magnussen C, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Socioeconomic Position and the Tracking of Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness From Childhood to Adulthood', American Journal of Epidemiology, 170, (9) pp. 1069-1077. ISSN 0002-9262 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwp271 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 88Web of Science - 85

Co-authors: Magnussen C; Venn A

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2009MacFarlane A, Cleland V, Crawford D, Campbell K, Timperio A, 'Longitudinal examination of the family food environment and weight status among children', International Journal of Pediatric Obesity , 31 pp. 1-10. ISSN 1747-7166 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3109/17477160902846211 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 55Web of Science - 51

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2009Schmidt MD, Cleland V, Shaw K, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Cardiometabolic Risk in Younger and Older Adults Across an Index of Ambulatory Activity ', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 37, (4) pp. 278-284. ISSN 0749-3797 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2009.05.020 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 67Web of Science - 61

Co-authors: Schmidt MD; Shaw K; Venn A

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2009Welch N, Hunter W, Butera K, Willis KF, Cleland V, et al., 'Women's work. Maintaining a healthy body weight', Appetite: The Journal for Research on Intake, and Dietary Practices, Their Control and Consequences, 53, (1) pp. 9-15. ISSN 0195-6663 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2009.04.221 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Willis KF

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2008Azar D, Ball K, Salmon J, Cleland V, 'The association between physical activity and depressive symptoms in young women: A review', Mental Health and Physical Activity , 1, (2) pp. 82-88. ISSN 1755-2966 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.mhpa.2008.09.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29

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2008Cleland V, Crawford D, Baur L, Hume C, Timperio A, et al., 'A prospective examination of children's time spent outdoors, objectively measured physical activity and overweight', International Journal of Obesity: and Related Metabolic Disorders, 32, (11) pp. 1685-1693. ISSN 0307-0565 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2008.171 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 202Web of Science - 193

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2008Cleland V, Crawford D, Timperio A, 'Are perceptions of the physical and social environment associated with mothers' walking for leisure and transport behaviours? A longitudinal study', Preventive Medicine: An International Journal Devoted to Practice and Theory, 47, (2) pp. 188-193. ISSN 0091-7435 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.05.010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 65Web of Science - 64

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2008Cleland V, Dwyer T, Blizzard CL, Venn A, 'The provision of compulsory school physical activity: Associations with physical activity, fitness and overweight in childhood and twenty years later', The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 5, (14) EJ ISSN 1479-5868 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-5-14 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Blizzard CL; Venn A

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2008Cleland V, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Physical Activity and Healthy Weight Maintenance From Childhood to Adulthood', Obesity, 16, (6) pp. 1427-1433. ISSN 1930-7381 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/oby.2008.215 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 15

Co-authors: Venn A

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2008Cleland V, Schmidt MD, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'Television viewing and abdominal obesity in young adults: is the association mediated by food and beverage consumption during viewing time or reduced leisure time physical activity?', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87, (5) pp. 1148-1155. ISSN 0002-9165 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/87.5.1148 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 136Web of Science - 126

Co-authors: Schmidt MD; Venn A

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2008Dwyer T, Magnussen CG, Schmidt MD, Ukoumunne OC, Ponsonby AL, et al., 'Decline in Physical Fitness From Childhood to Adulthood Associated With Increased Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults ', Diabetes Care, 32, (4) pp. 683-687 . ISSN 0149-5992 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.2337/dc08-1638 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 96Web of Science - 85

Co-authors: Dwyer T; Magnussen CG; Schmidt MD; Ponsonby AL; Thomson Russell; Venn A

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2008Schmidt MD, Cleland V, Thomson RJ, Dwyer T, Venn A, 'A Comparison of Subjective and Objective Measures of Physical Activity and Fitness in Identifying Associations with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors', Annals of Epidemiology, 18, (5) pp. 378-386. ISSN 1047-2797 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2008.01.005 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 69Web of Science - 65

Co-authors: Schmidt MD; Thomson RJ; Venn A

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2007Venn A, Thomson R, Schmidt M, Cleland V, Curry BA, et al., 'In Reply: Overweight and obesity from childhood to adulthood: a follow-up of participants in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey', Medical Journal of Australia, 187 pp. 314-315. ISSN 0025-729X (2007) [Letter or Note in Journal]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Venn A; Thomson R; Schmidt M; Curry BA; Gennat H

2007Venn A, Thomson Russell, Schmidt MD, Cleland V, Curry BA, et al., 'Overweight and obesity from childhood to adulthood: a follow-up of participants in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey', Medical Journal of Australia, 186, (9) pp. 458-460. ISSN 0025-729X (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2007.tb00997.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 186Web of Science - 172

Co-authors: Venn A; Thomson Russell; Schmidt MD; Curry BA; Gennat HC; Dwyer T

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2005Cleland V, 'Invited Comment: Evidence for secular trends in children's physical activity behaviour', British Journal of Sports Medicine, 39 pp. 897. ISSN 0306-3674 (2005) [Letter or Note in Journal]

[eCite] [Details]

2005Cleland V, Venn A, Fryer JL, Dwyer T, Blizzard CL, 'Parental exercise is associated with Australian children's extracurricular sports participation and cardiorespiratory fitness: a cross-sectional study', International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2, (3) pp. 3-11. ISSN 1479-5868 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1479-5868-2-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 67

Co-authors: Venn A; Fryer JL; Dwyer T; Blizzard CL

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2005Salmon J, Timperio A, Cleland V, Venn A, 'Trends in children's physical activity and weight status in high and low socio-economic status areas of Melbourne, Victoria, 1985-2001', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 29, (4) pp. 337-342. ISSN 1326-0200 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2005.tb00204.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 142Web of Science - 126

Co-authors: Venn A

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2004Cleland V, Worsley A, Crawford D, 'What are grade five and six children buying from school canteens and what do parents and teachers think about it?', Nutrition & Dietetics, 61, (3) pp. 145-150. ISSN 1446-6368 (2004) [Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Chapter in Book

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2010Cleland V, Ball K, Crawford D, 'Social and Environmental Determinants of Health Behaviors', Handbook of Behavioral Medicine, Springer , Andrew Steptoe (ed), London, pp. 3-18. ISBN 978-0-387-09487-8 (2010) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Conference Publication

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Cleland V, Tian J, Buscot M-J, Magnussen C, Bazzano LA, et al., 'Body mass index trajectories from childhood to adulthood: Evidence from the International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort (i3C) Consortium', Circulation, pp. 1, Vol 139 (Suppl_1). ISSN 0009-7322 (2019) [Conference Extract]

DOI: 10.1161/circ.139.suppl_1.MP66 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Tian J; Buscot M-J; Magnussen C; Venn AJ

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2012Jose K, Cleland V, Hansen E, Venn A, 'Maintaining participation in physical activity from childhood to young adulthood. Is fluctuating participation the norm?', 4th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, 'Be Active', October 31 - November, Sydney, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jose K; Hansen E; Venn A

Other Public Output

(7 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Cleland V, Jose K, Stanesby O, Lester D, Leppard L, et al., 'Understanding and PROmoting Active living in Rural Tasmania: UPROAR', Active Living in Rural Tasmania: Dover, Australia (2021) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jose K; Stanesby O

2021Cleland V, Jose K, Stanesby O, Lester D, Leppard L, et al., 'Understanding and PROmoting Active living in Rural Tasmania: UPROAR', Active Living in Rural Tasmania: Smithton, Australia (2021) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jose K; Stanesby O

2021Cleland V, Jose K, Stanesby O, Lester D, Leppard L, et al., 'Understanding and PROmoting Active living in Rural Tasmania: UPROAR', Active Living in Rural Tasmania: Ouse, Australia (2021) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jose K; Stanesby O

2021Cleland V, Nash M, Sharman M, Moore R, Waddingham S, et al., 'Final Report Girls in Action Sports Project (GASP)', Tasmanian Government, through Communities, Sport and Recreation Division - Department of Communities, Tasmania, via Womensport and Recreation Tasmania, Australia, pp. 1-40. (2021) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Nash M; Sharman M; Moore R; Waddingham S; Oakley Anita

2018Roehrer E, Kendal D, Elliott C, Pharo E, Springer M, et al., 'Making Hobart a smart place: a healthy, just and ecological approach to smart cities', Workshop held at the Education Pod, Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens, University of Tasmania, Hobart (2018) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Roehrer E; Kendal D; Elliott C; Pharo E; Springer M; Schofield L; Scanlan JD

2014Cleland V, Squibb K, Hughes C, Venn A, Thornton L, et al., 'Creating environments that support active living in rural Tasmania: Findings from a qualitative study', pp. 1-18. (2014) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Squibb K; Hughes C; Venn A

2010Pearson S, Sanderson K, Cleland V, Venn A, 'Get Moving at Work: Evaluation of a Resource Kit for Workplace Health and Wellbeing Programs', Report for the Tasmanian Premier's Physical Activity Council, Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, Australia, pp. 1-23. (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pearson S; Sanderson K; Venn A

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

21

Total funding

$4,605,227

Projects

Healthy Tasmania Evaluation Project (2021)$220,000
Description
This project involves the development and implementation of an evaluation framework for the Healthy Tasmania 2021-2026 five-year plan, exploring use of expertise in data linkage to monitor population health outcomes, and building shared capacity across UTAS and the Tasmanian Department of Health in monitoring, evaluation and priority setting.
Funding
Department of Health (Tasmania) ($220,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V
Year
2021
Improving cardiovascular health through walking and cycling for transport (2021 - 2024)$561,400
Description
To harness the potential of transport-related PA, this research program aims to fill these evidence and practice gaps through three distinct but inter-related phases, building on my Future Leader Level 1 Fellowship work and recently funded research successes. The first phase is fundamental research to deeply understand transport-related PA and its impacts on cardiovascular health. The second phase builds on this by testing the merits and affordability of an incentives-based intervention to increase transport-related PA. The third phase works with stakeholders to ensure translation of interventions into policy and practice. Collectively, this research program will inform strategies to increase PA among adults, and so reduce the cardiovascular disease burden on all Australians.
Funding
Heart Foundation ($561,400)
Scheme
Fellowship-Future Leader
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V
Period
2021 - 2024
Developing benchmarks and a smart online tool for assessing walkability in regional and rural communities: Supporting rural Australians to live healthy, active lives (2020 - 2021)$570,968
Description
The overall objective is to co-design with policy-makers, practitioners and community members a practical and scalable tool that enables rural communities to identify and prioritise aspects of their local built environment that impact on walkability and physical activity. This will be achieved through spatial assessments of walkability in rural areas, and engagement with end-users to design an online walkability assessment tool, collect and interpret data, and set priority areas for action. Co-design of the study with policy-makers and of the online walkability assessment tool with policy-makers, practitioners and community members vastly enhances the scalability potential of the tool, ensuring readiness for immediate rollout across regional and rural Australia and beyond.
Funding
Medical Research Future Fund ($570,968)
Scheme
Grant - Preventative and Public Health Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V; Timperio A; Jose KA; Davern M
Period
2020 - 2021
Effects of Different Holiday Experiences in Tasmania on Visitors' Emotional Wellbeing (2019 - 2020)$127,000
Description
The project will assess emotional wellbeing effects of a brief holiday in Tasmania (between three and ten days), accounting for different tourist characteristics and daily experiences. Using a modified form of the Tourism Tracer app, including a mix of longitudinal (pre-post) surveys, daily experience sampling and geospatial data, we will assess the influence of location on mood and stress, and will assess changes in tourists psychological capital, distress and life satisfaction after returning home. Reflections collected in follow-up interviews will provide a rich source of information to build a phenomenological understanding of tourist experiences specific to the population and region being studied, and may help explain differential pre-post holiday effects on wellbeing outcomes
Funding
Tourism Tasmania ($127,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V; Hardy A; Ferguson SG; Neil A
Period
2019 - 2020
Changing the Game for Girls in Action Sports (2019 - 2020)$37,858
Description
The GASP project aims to: 1) identify the enablers and barriers to girls participation in three emerging action sports; and 2) enable future evaluations of the impact of strategies to redress gender inequity in these three action sports. These aims will be achieved by: 1) conducting interviews and focus groups with girls, boys, parents, officials, board/committee representatives, and other key stakeholders; and 2) conducting a desktop review of participation rates and equity-related policies in these three sports. The resulting information will be analysed, synthesised and presented as a publicly available report with a set of practice, policy and research recommendations. Other outputs may include academic publications and presentations at conferences and forums.
Funding
Womensport and Recreation Tasmanian ($37,858)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V; Nash MB; Sharman MJ
Period
2019 - 2020
Unlocking the potential of a novel setting to promote physical activity (PA) among patients with Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA) - parkrun (2018 - 2019)$31,313
Description
Participating in PA reduces pain and improves function in people with KOA. Despite this, people with KOA are alarmingly inactive. It is, therefore, of high priority to identify effective, low-cost and sustainable PA promotion strategies for KOA. parkrun is an international movement of weekly 5 km walk/run events held in public spaces. Parkrun has a broad appeal to various population groups including non-athletes, however no previous reports had evaluated parkrun as a promising PA promotion setting for KOA. Our study will determine the feasibility, acceptability and safety of parkrun as a novel strategy to promote PA for people with KOA.
Funding
Medibank Better Health Foundation ($31,313)
Scheme
Grant - Project Grant Funding
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Aitken D; Lahham A; Jose KA; Cleland V; Jones Graeme; Winzenberg TM; Grunseit A
Period
2018 - 2019
Health by Stealth: Increasing Physical Activity through Active Travel in Tasmania (2018 - 2020)$282,362
Description
We are facing a global inactivity crisis. Participation in recommended amounts of physical activity (PA) has remained stagnant since the 1980s,indicating limited population-level impact of strategies to promote PA. A shift in focus from leisure-time to transport-related PA holds promiseas an attractive but under-exploited opportunity to support individuals to incorporate more activity into daily life. Healthy transport options walking, cycling and public transport are critical social determinants of health, by reducing traffic accidents, increasing social contact,reducing air pollution, and increasing exercise. Improving our understanding of travel behaviours and identifying strategies to increase use ofhealthy transport options have been identified by our three highly engaged Tasmanian Partner Organisations as important priorities. This projectseeks to generate evidence with service providers, state government and local government authorities to support decision-making and resourceallocation in relation to increasing active and public transport use. Working closely with our Partners, we will analyse data from existing datasources to better understand Tasmanians travel behaviours and the factors that influence these, by evaluating the effectiveness of two realworldfiscal strategies aiming to increase active and public transport use, and by developing and implementing a knowledge transfer strategy toensure findings are effectively communicated. This project will generate some of the first evidence internationally about the effectiveness offiscal strategies to increase active and public transport use, and will provide crucial information to directly impact the work of service providers,decision makers, policy-makers and practitioners. By identifying effective strategies to increase PA through active transport, the implications of this project have the potential to make major direct health, social, environmental and economic impacts globally.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($272,362)
Scheme
Grant-Partnership Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V; Ball K; Blizzard CL; Greaves S; Jose KA; Palmer AJ; Venn A
Period
2018 - 2020
Grant Reference
1152999
Changing the game for girls in action sports (2018)$17,096
Description
The project examines three action sports (skateboarding, surfing, mountain-biking) as cases to investigate girls PA participation and the strategies girls employ to carve out spaces for themselves in these sporting contexts nationally.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($17,096)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Nash MB; Cleland V; Sharman MJ; Spaaij R; Allen-Collinson J
Year
2018
Understanding the perspectives of general practitioners regarding sedentary behaviour management in primary care: a qualitative study (2018 - 2019)$54,977
Description
Despite the growing population-based evidence that demonstrated the strong linear association between sedentary behaviour and increased risk of chronic disease including type 2 diabetes and premature mortality, it is currently unknown how general practitioners (GPs) address this important risk factor in primary care. As GPs have the potential to implement health-related behavioural change as their advice is often respected and they are the 'front line' of the Australian health care system, we aim to understand the perspectives of GPs regarding the importance of sedentary behaviour assessment and management in primary care. To achieve this, we will explore the following research questions using an inductive qualitative research design and open-ended interview questions: (1) How do GPs perceive sedentary behaviour assessment and management in primary care? (2) Are GPs aware of sedentary behaviour management recommendations and/or of any strategies to implement sedentary behaviour management? (3) What are the GPs perceived barriers and facilitators to addressing sedentary behaviour assessment and management in primary care?
Funding
Royal Australian College of General Practitioners ($54,977)
Scheme
Diabetes Australia Research Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Winzenberg TM; Hansen EC; Cleland V; Warnecke E; Lahham A
Period
2018 - 2019
Developing a Collaborative Transport Research Program (2017)$10,000
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-DKD Booster
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Pharo EJ; Cleland V; Cheng SK; Primo Perez C; Peterson CJ
Year
2017
Cardiometabolic risk trajectories from childhood to midlife: finding pathways to better health (2017 - 2020)$1,531,986
Description
Using data from a large cohort of Australian children followed for over 30 years, this study will investigate how weight status and physical fitness from childhood to adulthood determine early markers of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (cardiometabolic disease) in midlife. It will provide much needed evidence to address the high prevalence of cardiometabolic disease risk factors in young Australians through better targeted disease prevention and early clinical intervention strategies.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($1,531,986)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Venn A; Marwick TH; Blizzard CL; Magnussen CG; Gall SL; Cleland V; Sanderson Kristy; Oddy WH; Dwyer Terry
Period
2017 - 2020
Grant Reference
1128373
Promoting active, healthy lifestyles among women at key life-stages (2016 - 2019)$448,000
Description
Physical inactivity is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and is beneficial in prevention and management of most other major CVD risk factors (high blood pressure and cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, depression). Despite this, 70% of Australian adults are not active at recommended levels. Women are less active than men, physical inactivity has increased among women (but not men), and there is socioeconomic and geographic patterning of physical inactivity. Changing behaviour is difficult, but key life-stages and events (eg. leaving school, parenthood, retirement), where changes in social roles, schedules and leisure activities occur, offer opportune times to promote health messages.Among women, the overall aims of this research are to:1. Identify the critical individual, social and environmental factors that predict physical activity over time2. Determine how key life-stage events, socioeconomic position and urban/rural status impact on the critical factors that predict physical activity over time3. Develop and test the feasibility and efficacy of strategies to promote physical activity This research will identify the complex mechanisms underlying physical activity behaviour at different life-stages, highlighting the critical factors to target in public health programs and policies. This tailoring will in turn increase strategy appeal and effectiveness, resulting in increased physical activity levels and improved cardiovascular health.
Funding
Heart Foundation ($448,000)
Scheme
Fellowship-Future Leader
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V
Period
2016 - 2019
Understanding obesity trajectories from childhood to adulthood (2016)$35,000
Description
1) To identify the sociodemographic factors that predict improving obesity trajectoriesfrom childhood to adulthood; 2) To explore the impact of individual, social and environmentalfactors and key lifestage events on obesity trajectories from childhood into adulthood
Funding
Menzies Institute for Medical Research ($35,000)
Scheme
Grant - Development Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V; Magnussen CG; Jose KA
Year
2016
Exploring the public health potential of parkrun in Tasmania (2016)$6,935
Description
Regular physical activity is essential for preventing chronic diseases, yet only 30% of Australians exercise adequately for good health. However, older adults, who are at risk for obesity and chronic disease, are least likely to exercise. Understanding the reasons for physical activity participation among this population group is a fundamental first step in developing approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Using a data-driven approach, this project will examine interpersonal, intrapersonal and environmental reasons for participating in parkrun, an Australia-wide network of free, weekly timed 5km runs/walks in public parks. Parkrun is notable because it has minimal barriers to participation it requires no payment, specialised equipment/clothing, it has no upper/lower age limit, nor does it require previous experience with running. As a mass participation community running/walking event, parkrun may have significant untapped potential for public health gain. By identifying strategies for widening social accessibility of physical activity in Tasmania, this project will has the potential to improve health outcomes for Tasmanians, which would provide long-term social and economic benefits including reductions in the preventable disease burden and significant savings in health care costs.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($6,935)
Scheme
Grant-Cross-Disciplinary Incentive
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Nash MB; Cleland V
Year
2016
Critical windows: understanding changes in eating and physical activity over the transition from secondary school to young adulthood (2013 - 2015)$325,343
Description
This project will explain changes in eating, physical activity and sedentary behaviour during the critical period of transition from secondary school to young adulthood. It will provide important information on how we can assist adolescents to maintain a healthy lifestyle over a time characterised by several major life changes.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($325,343)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
Deakin University
Research Team
Timperio A; Cleland V; Crawford DA; Dollman J
Period
2013 - 2015
Grant Reference
DP130101078
Understanding urban-rural influences on chronic disease risk factors and mental health in young adults: A five-year prospective study (2012)$6,520
Funding
The Select Foundation ($6,520)
Scheme
Grant-Small Grants Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Patterson KAE; Cleland V; Gall SL; Venn A
Year
2012
Young People and Physical Activity (2011)$17,272
Funding
The Link Youth Health Service ($17,272)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hughes CJ; Cleland V
Year
2011
Which Features of the Physical Activity Environment are Important for Physical Activity Among Rural Women? A Qualitative Investigation (2011)$24,970
Funding
University of Tasmania ($24,970)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cleland V
Year
2011
What factors influence the physical activity promotion and counselling behaviours of Tasmanian podiatrists (2011)$7,711
Funding
University of Tasmania ($7,711)
Scheme
Grant-Primary Health Care Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Crisford P; Cleland V; Winzenberg TM; Venn A
Year
2011
Understanding and promoting physical activity amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged women (2009 - 2012)$287,516
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($287,516)
Scheme
Fellowship-Australian Based Public Health
Administered By
National Health & Medical Research Council
Research Team
Cleland V
Period
2009 - 2012
Grant Reference
0533917
Maintaining or increasing relative physical activity levels is associated with maintaining a healthy weight from childhood into adulthood: the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (CDAH) study (2006)$1,000
Funding
Heart Foundation ($1,000)
Scheme
Grant-Travel
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Venn A; Cleland V
Year
2006

Research Supervision

Current

3

Completed

4

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDUnderstanding the Patterns and Predictors of Sedentary Behaviour amongst Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Women2017
PhDCo-designing Health Literacy Solutions with Tasmanian Mothers to Reduce Intergenerational Impact of Non-Communicable Diseases2019
PhDUnderstanding and Changing Transport-related Physical Activity: Evidence from observational and intervention research2020

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDDietary Fibre and its Associations with Inflammation and Depression in Adolescence
Candidate: Olivia Grace Swann
2021
PhDHow and Why do Podiatrists Promote Physical Activity?
Candidate: Paul Raymond Crisford
2019
PhDUnderstanding Urban-Rural Differences in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Across the Life Course
Candidate: Kira Ann Elizabeth Patterson
2017
PhDMaintaining participation in physical activity during the transition from adolescence to adulthood: A mixed methods study
Candidate: Kim Anne Jose
2013