Profiles

Catherine Butler

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Catherine Butler

Postgraduate

Life Science Building , Sandy Bay Campus

View more on Mrs Catherine Butler in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Population ecology (310307)
  • Behavioural ecology (310301)
  • Biosecurity science and invasive species ecology (410202)

Research Objectives

  • Control of pests, diseases and exotic species in terrestrial environments (180602)
  • Assessment and management of freshwater ecosystems (180301)
  • Terrestrial biodiversity (180606)
  • Rehabilitation or conservation of terrestrial environments (180604)

Publications

Total publications

1

Journal Article

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Watts ET, Johnson CN, Carver S, Butler CD, Harvey AM, et al., 'Maternal protectiveness in feral horses: responses to intraspecific and interspecific sources of risk', Animal Behaviour, 159 pp. 1-11. ISSN 0003-3472 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2019.10.018 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Watts ET; Johnson CN; Carver S; Cameron EZ

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Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

2

Total funding

$16,500

Projects

Analysis and modelling of feral horse demography in the Australian Alps (2020)$5,000
Description
This project will use data previously collected over a three-year period to analyse the demography rates of two populations of feral horses in the Australian Alps and develop a working demographic model to estimate the effort required to stabilise population growth.
Funding
Parks Victoria ($5,000)
Scheme
Scholarship - The Research Partners Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cameron EZ; Butler CD; Johnson CN
Year
2020
Quantitative assessment of feral horse abundance, movement patterns, and reproduction in the Australian Alps (2017 - 2018)$11,500
Description
Feral horses are considered a serious threat to Australian alpine ecosystems due to their large size and selective grazing. Monitoring impacts and managing feral horses requires knowledge of local density, and population estimations must be accurate and cost-effective.In 2014 aerial surveys estimated there were 9,455 feral horses in the Australian Alps. While helicopter counts are useful for broad estimates, they are costly, making extensive use impractical, and are less accurate in smaller areas. This project aims to develop a local population estimation technique by censusing 3 feral horse populations and determining the accuracy of various population density estimation methods.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($11,500)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cameron EZ; Butler CD
Period
2017 - 2018