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Sonya Stanford

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Sonya Stanford

Head of Discipline, Social Work
Senior Lecturer, Social Work
Graduate Research Coordinator, Social Work
School of Social Sciences

Room 239, Arts Building, Newnham Campus

+61 3 6324 3720 / 0439 768 461 (phone)

Sonya.Stanford@utas.edu.au

Since qualifying as a social worker in 1992, I have worked in various fields of practice in the government and non-government sectors. I have been involved in social work education for many years in Tasmania, teaching across undergraduate and postgraduate programs. My skills as a social work educator who engages students in deep, reflective learning experiences about contemporary theoretical and practice issues has been recognised through being awarded several UTAS teaching merit certificates and by being awarded the national award for 'Best Academic Educator' by the Australian Association of Social Work and Welfare Educators in 2011.

My doctoral and post-doctoral research program has focused upon examining the operations of risk and their interface with social justice issues in the organisation and provision of welfare services. I adopt a critical stance in this research to examine how rationalities and practices of risk impact upon the wellbeing and outcomes of people who use and deliver welfare services. I have considered how risk operates in the contexts of generic social work practice, police work with 'vulnerable' populations, mental health services, and the provision of government funded income support. I am currently conducting research that explores how practitioners undertake suicide risk assessments in non-government mental health services.

I have held major administrative roles within the Social Work program, including Head of Discipline, BSW Coordinator, BSW Honours Coordinator and Research Higher Degrees Coordinator. I regularly conduct training and undertake consultancy work in the community and health services sector.

Teaching

Teaching responsibility

View more on Dr Sonya Stanford in WARP

Expertise

Sonya researches in the following areas:

  • Risk theory and practice in social work
  • Risk, social justice and mental health
  • Risk, social justice and welfare services
  • Risk, social justice and welfare conditionality

Fields of Research

  • Counselling, Welfare and Community Services (160702)
  • Social Work (160799)
  • Clinical Social Work Practice (160701)
  • Mental Health (111714)
  • Sociology of Education (160809)
  • Social Change (160805)
  • Higher Education (130103)
  • Urban Sociology and Community Studies (160810)
  • Health Policy (160508)
  • Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
  • Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl. Economics, Business and Management) (130205)
  • Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators (130313)
  • Police Administration, Procedures and Practice (160205)
  • Continuing and Community Education (130101)
  • Social Program Evaluation (160703)
  • Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogy (130209)
  • Social Theory (160806)
  • Educational Technology and Computing (130306)
  • Health and Community Services (111708)

Research Objectives

  • Community Service (excl. Work) (940199)
  • Mental Health Services (920209)
  • Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society (970116)
  • Teacher and Instructor Development (930202)
  • Mental Health (920410)
  • Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services) (920201)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Development and Welfare (940102)
  • Children's/Youth Services and Childcare (940105)
  • Women's Health (920507)
  • Syllabus and Curriculum Development (930302)
  • Gender and Sexualities (940113)
  • Health Policy Evaluation (920208)
  • Behaviour and Health (920401)
  • The Media (950204)
  • Criminal Justice (940403)
  • Child Health (920501)
  • Ageing and Older People (940103)
  • Workforce Transition and Employment (939908)
  • Learner and Learning (930199)
  • Employment Services (940109)
  • Teaching and Instruction Technologies (930203)
  • Assessment and Evaluation of Curriculum (930301)
  • Families and Family Services (940112)
  • Pedagogy (930201)

Publications

Total publications

38

Highlighted publications

(1 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2010Journal ArticleStanford S, ''Speaking Back' to Fear: Responding to the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', British Journal of Social Work, 40, (4) pp. 1065-1080. ISSN 0045-3102 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcp156 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 56Web of Science - 51

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Journal Article

(6 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Lemon G, Stanford S, Sawyer A-M, 'Trust and the dilemmas of suicide risk assessment in nongovernment mental health services', Australian Social Work, 69, (2) pp. 145-157. ISSN 0312-407X (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1131843 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

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2016Sawyer AM, Stanford S, Campbell J, 'Mental Health Social Work: Perspectives on Risk, Regulation, and Therapeutic Interventions', 69, (2) pp. 129-132. ISSN 0312-407X (2016) [Edited Journal]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1129428 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

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2013Stanford S, Taylor S, 'Welfare Dependence or Enforced Deprivation? A Critical Examination of White Neoliberal Welfare and Risk', Australian Social Work, 66, (4) pp. 476-494. ISSN 0312-407X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2013.832789 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Taylor S

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2011Stanford SN, 'Constructing moral responses to risk: a framework for hopeful social work practice', British Journal of Social Work, 41, (8) pp. 1514-1531. ISSN 1468-263X (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcr030 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29Web of Science - 23

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2010Stanford S, ''Speaking Back' to Fear: Responding to the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', British Journal of Social Work, 40, (4) pp. 1065-1080. ISSN 0045-3102 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcp156 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 56Web of Science - 51

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2008Stanford SN, 'Taking a stand or playing it safe: revisiting the moral conservatism of risk in social work practice', European Journal of Social Work, 11, (3) pp. 209-220. ISSN 1369-1457 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13691450802075063 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 21

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Book

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Pease B, Vreugdenhil A, Stanford S, 'Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring', Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 296. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Edited Book]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pease B; Vreugdenhil A

2017Stanford SN, Sharland E, Heller NR, Warner J, 'Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health Policy and Practice', Macmillian Education UK, United Kingdom ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Edited Book]

[eCite] [Details]

Chapter in Book

(7 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Pease B, Vreugdenhil A, Stanford S, 'Towards a critical ethic of care in social work', Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring, Taylor & Francis Group Ltd, B Pease, A Vreugdenhil and S Stanford (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 3-15. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pease B; Vreugdenhil A

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2018Sawyer A, Stanford S, 'The Risks of Care and Caring about Risk in Mental Health', Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring, Routledge, B Pease, A Vreugdenhil and S Stanford (ed), New York, pp. 63-73. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sawyer A

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2017Hendry N, Robards B, Stanford S, 'Beyond social media panics for 'at risk' youth in mental health practice', Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health, Palgrave Macmillan, S Stanford, NR Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 135-154. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Sharland E, Rovinelli Heller N, Stanford S, Warner J, 'Conclusion: remoralizing risk in mental health policy and practice', Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health Policy and Practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 174-190. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Stanford S, Rovinelli Heller N, Sharland E, Warner J, 'Moving beyond neoliberal rationalities of risk in mental health policy and practice', Beyond the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 45-58. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Warner J, Rovinelli Heller N, Sharland E, Stanford S, 'The historical context of the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice: how did we get here?', Beyond the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 1-16. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2012Stanford S, 'Critically Reflecting on being 'at Risk' and 'a Risk' in Vulnerable People Policing', Policing Vulnerability, The Federation Press, I Bartkowiak-Theron and NL Asquith (ed), Annandale, NSW, pp. 20-32. ISBN 978-186287-897-6 (2012) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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Conference Publication

(11 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Moulding N, Stanford S, ''Futuring' Social Work Through Next Generation Leadership', Leading Social Work Education in the 21st Century: An International Colloquium, 18-21 September 2017, Monash University Prato Centre, Italy (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Stanford S, Sawyer A, 'Suffering Risk in Person-Centred Mental Health Care', ANZSWWER 2017 Symposium, 7-8 September 2017, Auckland (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Stanford S, 'Echoes from the past: Seeking the future of Tasmanian social work education using codesign', ANZSWWER 2017 Symposium, 7-8 September 2017, Auckland (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Stanford SN, 'A Reflective Approach to Risk in Everyday Mental Health Practice', Mental Health Social Work and Risk: Messages from Research, 28 May 2013, Goldsmiths University of London (2013) [Keynote Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Stanford SN, 'Australian Social Work Education', International Social Work Eduction, 30 May 2013, Goldsmiths University of London (2013) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2012Stanford SN, 'Risk Identities in Mental Health Practice: Practioner and Consumer Perspectives', Beyond the Risk Paradigm: Restoring the Client's Pace in Human Service Intervention, 23-25 May 2012, Monash University Centre, Prato, Italy, pp. 1-15. (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2009Bland R, Stanford SN, 'Teaching to Do or Teaching to Be in Social Work', Social Work: From Scientism to Sophism - the Ethics of Evidence and the Evidence of Ethics, 5-8 November 2009, Sunshine Coast, Queensland, pp. 1. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bland R

2009Stanford SN, 'Resolving the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', 20th Asia Pacific Social Work Conference: Many Voices, Many Communities, Social Justice for All, 10-11 November 2009, Auckland, New Zealand, pp. 20. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2008Stanford SN, 'Change, care, contexts & power: A conceptual framework for teaching in Social Work', Strength in Unity Conference, 9-12 November 2008, Luna Park, Sydney (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2005Stanford SN, 'The Moral Discourse of Risk in Social Work', Risky Business, 11 November 2005, University of Tasmania, pp. 1-17. (2005) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2004Stanford SN, 'Reading an Ethics of Risk in Social Work', Global Social Work 2004: Reclaiming Civil Society, 2-5 October 2004, Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide (2004) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2011Stanford SN, 'Clinical Review of Practice' (2011) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

2007Stanford SN, 'Working for Change: The Role and Practice of Social Work at the LGH', Department of Health and Human Services, Tasmania (2007) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Major Creative Work

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Cook PS, Vince J, Stanford S, 'May contain traces of…', Burnie Regional Art Gallery (2017) [Repeat Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cook PS; Vince J

2017Cook PS, Vince JZ, Stanford SN, 'May contain traces of…', 10 Days on the Island, Academy Gallery - Inveresk (2017) [Other Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cook PS; Vince JZ

2011Willis KF, Schneiders MA, Stanford SN, 'Tree of Hope: 5 Years on - Exhibition', New Gallery, Newnham (2011) [Curated Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Willis KF; Schneiders MA

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Thesis

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2007Stanford SN, 'The Operations of Risk: The Meaning, Emotion & Morality of Risk Identities in Social Work Practice' (2007) [PhD]

[eCite] [Details]

1999Stanford SN, 'Women's Experiences of the Diagnosis of Post-natal Depression' (1999) [Masters Coursework]

[eCite] [Details]

Other Public Output

(5 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2014Stanford SN, 'A no-win situation? Public forum on risks in mental health practice', 936 ABC Hobart, Breakfast with Ryk Goddard', ABC Hobart, Australia, 1, 1 (2014) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Stanford SN, 'Public forum in Launceston examines risks in mental health practice', Public forum in Launceston examines risks in mental health practice, WIN Television, Australia, 1 (2014) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

2011Stanford SN, Schneiders MA, Willis KF, 'Tree of Hope - 5 Years On', The Examiner, Newspapers in Education, Fairfax Media, Launceston, Tasmania, 25 October 2011, pp. 25-28. (2011) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Schneiders MA; Willis KF

2010Stanford SN, 'Submission to the Parliament of Tasmania Select Committee on Child Protection', Submission to the Parliament of Tasmania Select Committee on Child Protection, Launceston, Tasmania (2010) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

2003Stanford SN, 'Parenthood covered in Tassie forum', Melbourne Community Voice, Evolution Publishing, Melbourne, 136, July 25 2003 (2003) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

10

Total funding

$102,191

Projects

High quality educational research into the use of e-portfolios (portfolios) to promote curriculum integration and lead evidence of attaining professional standards (2018)$13,144
Description
Significant changes in the Australian higher education sector, including deregulated enrolments andsubsequent unregulated growth in professional qualifying programs (e.g. Social Work, Education andAssociate Degrees), have created major challenges for universities and their industry partners. Of particularconcern is the need for, and increasing difficulty in securing, sufficient numbers of high quality professionaleducation placements and work-integrated learning opportunities (Allen & Wright, 2014).This proposed research project asks What are the advantages of using portfolios in work-integrated andprofessional qualifying university programs, for students, the University and the placement agencies, aimingto explore how student portfolios contribute to the redesign of one of the most resource-intensive aspects ofplacements (Beckers, Dolmans, & van Merrinboer, 2016): the evidence-based assessment of studentachievement of professional practice standards (e.g. https://www.aasw.asn.au/careers-study/asweas-2017-launch and https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards).UTAS new portfolio software for MyLO, and web-based documentation management system, provide anopportunity for the partners to integrate curricula with authentic field/placement study and work-integratedlearning (Degrees of Difference, 2016; Venville, Cleak & Bould, 2017).Portfolios offer a highly flexible formative and/or summative pedagogic approach (Gmiz-Snchez, Gallego-Arrufat, & Crisol-Moya, 2016), and are accessible to work-based supervisors, enabling co-design, delivery,moderated assessment of student achievement (and evaluation) of the curriculum (Mahar & Strobert, 2010;Schuwirth & van der Vleuten, 2011).The project capitalises on complementary expertise from the Discipline of Social Work (Social Sciences) andthe School of Education, with the University College, and responds to well-documented social welfare andeducational needs in the State (West, 2013).This new partnership will use a literature scoping review, surveys of students and peers/colleague supervisorsand case study approach (see timelines below) to thoroughly document the current baseline, compared withthe use of portfolios to augment learning in practice, to provide the foundation for the development of an ARCLinkage grant application.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($13,144)
Scheme
Grant - CALE Hothouse Alignment Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Quentin-Baxter M; Vreugdenhil AJ; Masters JE; Stanford SN; Downing JJ; Carr AR; McDonald T
Year
2018
An exploration of University academic staffs self-perception about supporting diverse learners (2018)$9,387
Description
In the last few decades, increasing equitable access to higher education has been on the agenda for Governments globally. Yet, completion rates and other indicators for achievement for people from diverse backgrounds remain low. This project looks at this issue from the perspective of academics. How do academics perceive their ability and capacity to support diverse learners?
Funding
University of Tasmania ($9,387)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Reaburn RL; Beasy KM; Mainsbridge C; Murphy C; Stanford SN
Year
2018
Reducing the impact of intergenerational trauma through collaborative learning. Pilot Study. (2018)$10,000
Description
This pilot project asks What effect does a collaborative approach to learning have on reducing the impact of intergenerational trauma, to explore how Early Childhood Educators, Social Workers and Health Professionals (professionals) collaborate to develop parental capacity for connection, felt-safety and self-regulation, and how these can be applied by both parent and professional when caring for the child. A Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) approach (Purvis et al., 2013) will be piloted in the Ravenswood Child and Family Centre where the impact of intergenerational trauma is recognised. Professionals and parents will be paired to work together in a weekly group situation to learn how to develop the skills identified as critical to the relationship. A mixed-methods approach will be used to analyse the learning journey of each participant. A focus on personal skill development, and evidence of the impact of this learning on the children in their care will inform the research question, and planning for an external research proposal to develop future training approaches (Razuri et al., 2016).
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stephenson EA; Stanford SN; Yost HF; Hay JK; Frey R
Year
2018
Combatting loneliness and suicide risk by activating third places: developing evidence-based interventions to build community resilience and wellbeing (2018)$19,814
Description
Grant-CCS Research ThemeAlarmed by burgeoning national rates of suicide, Lifeline Tasmania has approached UTAS to identify Tasmania -specific interventions as preventative measures against suicide. Tasmania has known suicide hotspots. Research suggests social isolation and loneliness are risk factors for mortality (Holt-Lunstad et al., 2015). Lifeline data indicates that a significant proportion of its crisis line calls are related to loneliness and isolation. Loneliness stems from population mobility, declining community participation, and demographic change (e.g. increasing single-occupant households) (Masi et al., 2011). A key question is: Can place-based interventions (third places) bolster social connectedness and community resilience to reduce loneliness and suicide risk in Tasmania?.Third places (e.g. community gardens & dog-parks) provide opportunities for informal social interaction and building connectedness (Matthews, 2018). Obligation-free informal interactions in third places can foster social interaction, engender sense of community and build friendships (Rosenbaum et al., 2007). Ideally third places are within walking distance of peoples homes and enable multiple activities. But what if vulnerable populations have reduced personal mobility? We presently lack research identifying efficacious ways to design mobile or pop-up third places to reach such at risk populations.Led by a multi-disciplinary team of experienced and ECR researchers, this project will employ a systematic quantitative literature review and follow up key stakeholder workshops (e.g. Lifeline, TasCOSS, Neighbourhood Houses Tasmania, Local Government Association Tasmania (LGAT) & Mental Health Council) to identify best practices and develop interventions for pilot-testing with at-risk populations. The literature review and workshop findings will be published in two Q1 journals (e.g. Health and Place). Study findings will inform a grant application to the Tasmanian Community Fund for a multi-year project to build and pilot-test an effective mobile third place and a Linkage Grant application to undertake evidence-based assessment of the efficacy of different interventions (i.e. community garden vs. dog park).
Funding
University of Tasmania ($19,814)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Byrne JA; Stanford SN; Hookway NS
Year
2018
Reducing Vulnerability to Suicide (2013)$12,000
Funding
University of Tasmania ($12,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2013
AHURI Top-Up Scholarship (Proudfoot, F) (2012 - 2014)$21,000
Description
This project will investigate the experiences of social housing practitioners providing tenancy management services to Aboriginal tenants.
Funding
Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute ($21,000)
Scheme
Scholarship-Top-Up
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Proudfoot F; Habibis D; Walter MM; Stanford SN
Period
2012 - 2014
2012: Beyond the risk paradigm: restoring the client's place in human service intervention - Italy (3 June to 4 June 2013) (2012)$1,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2012
Clinical Review of Practice (2011)$3,652
Funding
General Practice North ($3,652)
Scheme
Consultancy
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2011
Social Inclusion and 'Recovery' from Severe Mental Health Problems: The Consumer Experience (2010)$10,685
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,685)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2010
2009 R1 - 20th Asia Pacific Soical Work Conference 2009 (2009)$1,009
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,009)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2009

Research Supervision

Current

5

Completed

4

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDYoung People Engaging with Risk through Everyday Practices on Facebook2010
PhDThere was a brick wall, and there was the ocean: Stories of surviving childhood domestic abuse2015
PhDImpact of Issues of Trust for Frontline Workers Doing Suicide Risk Assessments in Non-Government Mental Health Services2016
PhDFrom Freud to Foucault to Feminism; an examination of Patriarchy, Power and Politics2018
PhDComing Out Later in Life and Help-seeking: Exploring the experiences of older lesbian and bisexual women2019

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDSocial Work in Neoliberal Times: Accommodation, resistance and disruption
Candidate: John David Wallace
2019
PhDCultural Difference: How race shapes the management of Indigenous tenants within social housing service provision
Candidate: Fiona Jan Proudfoot
2018
PhDShining a Light on Care in Direct Social Work Practice
Candidate: Jenny Kathryn Hay
2016
PhDA Relational Encounter: The lived experience of direct social work practice with people of refugee background
Candidate: Ann Joselynn Baltra-Ulloa
2014