Profiles

Chawalit Kocharunchitt

UTAS Home Dr Chawalit (‘Jay’) Kocharunchitt

Chawalit (‘Jay’) Kocharunchitt

Research Fellow

Room 453 , Life Sciences Building

+61 3 6226 2650 (phone)

Chawalit.Kocharunchitt@utas.edu.au

Dr Jay Kocharunchitt is a Research Fellow at the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture. His research areas include the physiology and ecology of pathogenic bacteria under conditions relevant to foods during their processing and storage, with a view to enabling the development of effective strategies to ensure the microbiological safety of foods.

Biography

Originally from Thailand, Dr Kocharunchitt studied his doctoral degree in the field of food microbiology at the FSC. His PhD project was funded by Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) to examine the physiological changes in Escherichia coli on carcasses during chilling. He together with colleagues and peers pioneered the technology and used bioinformatics tools to translate the extensive results into useful insights that could lead to new interventions against enteric pathogens on carcass. Upon completion of his degree in 2012, Dr Kocharunchitt pursues his interest and continues with research in food microbiology as a research fellow at the FSC. His current project is also funded by MLA to develop novel interventions for the Australian meat industry that could be used to eliminate E. coli during carcass chilling.

Career summary

Qualifications

DegreeThesis titleUniversityCountryAwarded
PhDEffects of air-chilling process on the physiology of Escherichia coli in relation to carcassesUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia01/09/2012
BBiotech (1st Class Hons)Use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents against Salmonella associated with seed sproutsUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia01/12/2007
BBiotech University of TasmaniaAustralia01/12/2006

Languages (other than English)

  • Thai

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Australian Society for Microbiology (ASM)
  • International Association for Food Protection (IAFP)

Teaching

Microbiology

Teaching responsibility

View more on Mr Chawalit Kocharunchitt in WARP

Expertise

Dr. Kocharunchitt has developed a solid knowledge of the eco-physiology of bacteria in foods. He has extensive experience in molecular microbiology including 'omics' technology, and bioinformatics tools. He has also developed his expertise in the mathematical modelling of microbial population behaviour in foods. His knowledge together with research experience enable him to conduct both basic and applied research to assess the physiological changes in bacterial cells during dynamic changes in bacterial populations as occurs in foods during their processing and storage.

  • Able to employ aseptic technique and carry out traditional microbiological methods
  • Able to carry out techniques for analysis of bacteriophages
  • Experience in using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), epi-fluorescence microscope and flow cytometer
  • Able to carry out a wide range of molecular-based techniques, including extraction of DNA and protein, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (tRFLP), clone library analysis, protein assay, gel-based proteomics, and gel-free proteomics.
  • Able to use mathematical, statistical and bioinformatics tools to analyse and interpret biological data.
  • Physiology and molecular biology of bacteria in response to environmental condition
  • Development of 'novel' interventions to ensure the microbiological safety of foods

Research Themes

Dr Kocharunchitt's research aligns to the University's research theme of Environment, Resources and Sustainability; and Data, Knowledge and Decisions. His research interests include understanding how bacteria respond in foods during their processing and storage. In particular, Dr Kocharunchitt is currently working on the project funded by MLA. This project aims to develop effective interventions that could be used to ensure the microbiological safety of meat carcasses.

International markets for Australian red meat are increasing their expectations and levels of evidence that pathogenic Escherichia coli or other pathogens are not present on products. The potential presence of pathogenic E. coli on Australian-produced meat presents a threat to the reputation and profitability of the Australian meat industry (i.e., the export value was approximately $7.7 billion in 2013-2014). To this end, Dr Kocharunchitt together with colleagues and peers used traditional studies in microbial ecology and physiology together with state of the art molecular biology techniques and predictive modelling to understand the physiological changes in pathogenic Escherichia coli on meat carcasses during processing. Such knowledge has provided new insights into potential, non-invasive and cost-effective ways to eliminate Escherichia coli from meat. Dr Kocharunchitt is currently developing a novel intervention for the Australian meat industry. Accordingly, he is increasingly recognised as a red meat microbial safety expert by the Australian meat industry.

Fields of Research

  • Bacteriology (310701)
  • Food packaging, preservation and processing (300604)
  • Proteomics and intermolecular interactions (excl. medical proteomics) (310109)
  • Microbiology (310799)
  • Food safety, traceability, certification and authenticity (300605)
  • Cell metabolism (310103)
  • Microbial ecology (310703)
  • Food sciences (300699)
  • Food sustainability (300606)
  • Post harvest horticultural technologies (incl. transportation and storage) (300806)
  • Other agricultural, veterinary and food sciences (309999)
  • Food technology (300607)
  • Food chemistry and food sensory science (300602)

Research Objectives

  • Food safety (200405)
  • Carcass meat (incl. fish and seafood) (241303)
  • Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences (280102)
  • Primary products from animals (100699)
  • Poultry (100411)
  • Livestock product traceability and quality assurance (109904)
  • Other health (209999)
  • Non-dairy milk (241307)
  • Field grown vegetable crops (260505)
  • Dairy products (240599)
  • Processed food products and beverages (excl. dairy products) (241399)
  • Tree nuts (excl. almonds and macadamias) (260515)
  • Cheese (240503)
  • Manufacturing standards and calibrations (150403)
  • Air freight (270101)
  • Processed meat products (241312)

Publications

Total publications

30

Journal Article

(18 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Block Z, Eyles A, Corkrey R, Stanley R, Ross T, et al., 'Effect of storage conditions on shelf stability of undiluted neutral electrolysed water', Journal of Food Protection ISSN 0362-028X (In Press) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.4315/JFP-20-104 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Block Z; Eyles A; Corkrey R; Stanley R; Ross T

Tweet

2021Gray J, Chandry PS, Kaur M, Kocharunchitt C, Fanning S, et al., 'Colonisation dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from food production environments', Scientific Reports, 11, (1) Article 12195. ISSN 2045-2322 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-91503-w [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP

Tweet

2021Gray JA, Chandry PS, Kaur M, Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, et al., 'Characterisation of Listeria monocytogenes food-associated isolates to assess environmental fitness and virulence potential', International Journal of Food Microbiology, 350 Article 109247. ISSN 0168-1605 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2021.109247 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Gray JA; Bowman JP

Tweet

2020Chen SH, Fegan N, Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, Duffy LL, 'Changes of the bacterial community diversity on chicken carcasses through an Australian poultry processing line', Food Microbiology, 86 Article 103350. ISSN 0740-0020 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2019.103350 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Fegan N; Bowman JP

Tweet

2020Chen SH, Fegan N, Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, Duffy LL, 'Effect of peracetic acid on Campylobacter in food matrices mimicking commercial poultry processing', Food Control, 113 Article 107185. ISSN 0956-7135 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.foodcont.2020.107185 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Fegan N; Bowman JP

Tweet

2020Chen SH, Fegan N, Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, Duffy LL, 'Impact of poultry processing operating parameters on bacterial transmission and persistence on chicken carcasses and their shelf life', Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 86, (12) Article e00594-20. ISSN 1098-5336 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1128/AEM.00594-20 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Bowman JP

Tweet

2020Kocharunchitt C, Mellefont L, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Application of chlorine dioxide and peroxyacetic acid during spray chilling as a potential antimicrobial intervention for beef carcasses', Food Microbiology, 87 Article 103355. ISSN 0740-0020 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.fm.2019.103355 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Mellefont L; Bowman JP; Ross T

Tweet

2020Sakai K, Lee JH, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, Jenson I, et al., 'Development of a Maillard reaction-based time-temperature integrator/indicator (TTI) for visual monitoring of chilled beef during long-term storage and distribution', Food and Bioprocess Technology, 13, (12) pp. 2094-2103. ISSN 1935-5130 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s11947-020-02549-z [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ross T

Tweet

2018Gray JA, Chandry PS, Kaur M, Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, et al., 'Novel biocontrol methods for Listeria monocytogenes biofilms in food production facilities', Frontiers in Microbiology, 9 Article 605. ISSN 1664-302X (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.00605 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 40Web of Science - 39

Co-authors: Gray JA; Kaur M; Bowman JP

Tweet

2016King T, Kocharunchitt C, Gobius K, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Physiological response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai to dynamic changes in temperature and water activity as experienced during carcass chilling', Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, 15, (11) pp. 3331-3347. ISSN 1535-9476 (2016) [Professional, Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1074/mcp.M116.063065 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

Tweet

2015Mellefont LA, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, 'Combined effect of chilling and desiccation on survival of Escherichia coli suggests a transient loss of culturability', International Journal of Food Microbiology, 208 pp. 1-10. ISSN 0168-1605 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2015.04.024 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Mellefont LA; Ross T

Tweet

2014King T, Kocharunchitt C, Gobius K, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Global genome response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai during dynamic changes in growth kinetics induced by an abrupt temperature downshift', PLoS One, 9, (6) Article e99627. ISSN 1932-6203 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099627 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

Tweet

2014Kocharunchitt C, King T, Gobius K, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Global genome response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai during dynamic changes in growth kinetics induced by an abrupt downshift in water activity', PLoS One, 9, (3) Article e90422. ISSN 1932-6203 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090422 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

Tweet

2013Bowman JP, Nilsson RE, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, 'Listeria monocytogenes: illuminating adaptation with proteomics', Microbiology Australia, 34, (2) pp. 75-77. ISSN 1324-4272 (2013) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1071/MA13026 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Nilsson RE; Ross T

Tweet

2012Bowman JP, Hages E, Nilsson RE, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, 'Investigation of the Listeria monocytogenes Scott A acid tolerance response and associated physiological and phenotypic features via whole proteome analysis', Journal of Proteome Research, 11, (4) pp. 2409-2426. ISSN 1535-3893 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1021/pr201137c [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Hages E; Nilsson RE; Ross T

Tweet

2012Kocharunchitt C, King T, Gobius K, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of the physiological response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai to steady-state conditions of cold and water activity stress', Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, 11, (1) Article M111.009019. ISSN 1535-9476 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1074/mcp.M111.009019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 42Web of Science - 43

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

Tweet

2011Porteus B, Kocharunchitt C, Nilsson RE, Ross T, Bowman JP, 'Utility of gel-free, label-free shotgun proteomics approaches to investigate microorganisms', Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 90, (2) pp. 407-416. ISSN 0175-7598 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00253-011-3172 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Porteus B; Nilsson RE; Ross T; Bowman JP

Tweet

2009Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, McNeil DL, 'Use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella associated with seed sprouts', International Journal of Food Microbiology, 128, (3) pp. 453-459. ISSN 0168-1605 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.10.014 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 92Web of Science - 89

Co-authors: Ross T; McNeil DL

Tweet

Book

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Huynh L, Jenson I, Kaur M, Kiermeier A, Kocharunchitt C, et al., 'Shelf life of Australian red meat', Meat & Livestock Australia, Australia, pp. 1-182. ISBN 9781740362399 (2016) [Revision/New Edition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Kaur M; Ross T

Conference Publication

(9 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2013Kocharunchitt C, Porteus BF, Mellefont LA, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Development of models to determine non-thermal inactivation of bacteria in cheese', The Australian Society for Microbiology Annual Scientific Meeting, 7-10 July 2013, Adelaide, South Australia (2013) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Porteus BF; Mellefont LA; Bowman JP; Ross T

2013Kocharunchitt C, Porteus BF, Wilson RR, Ross T, Bowman JP, 'The protein landscape of Listeria monocytogenes ScottA within its supraoptimal temperature growth range reveals a weakness to oxidative stress', 5th Congress of European Microbiologists (FEMS 2013), 21-25 July 2013, Liepzig, Germany (2013) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Porteus BF; Wilson RR; Ross T; Bowman JP

2013Mellefont LA, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, 'Modelling of the ecology of Listeria monocytogenes in foods', The Australian Society for Microbiology Annual Scientific Meeting, 7-10 July 2013, Adelaide, South Australia (2013) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mellefont LA; Ross T

2012Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Proteomic response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to simultaneous abrupt downshifts in temperature and water activity', The Australian Society for Microbiology Annual Scientific Meeting 2012, 1-4 July 2012, Brisbane, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

2011Bowman JP, Hages E, Kocharunchitt C, Nilsson R, Ross T, 'Proteome level responses of Listeria monocytogenes ScottA within a simulated fermentation system', International Union of Microbiological Societies 2011, 6-10 September 2011, Sapporo, Japan (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Hages E; Nilsson R; Ross T

2011Porteus BF, Nilsson R, Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, Bowman JP, 'Persistent phenotypes in Listeria monocytogenes revealed by a higher throughput proteomics approach', 1st International One Health Congress, 14-16 February 2011, Melbourne, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Porteus BF; Nilsson R; Ross T; Bowman JP

2010Kocharunchitt C, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Proteomic response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to steady-state conditions of cold and water activity stress', 22nd International ICFMH Symposium, Food Micro 2010, 30 August - 3 September 2010, Copenhagen, Denmark (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

2010Kocharunchitt Jay, Bowman JP, Ross T, 'Proteomic analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in response to steady-state conditions of cold and water activity stress', Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on the Genetics of Industrial Microorganisms 2010, 28 June - 1 July 2010, Melbourne, Victoria (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman JP; Ross T

2010McNeil DL, Kocharunchitt C, Savage GP, Phua YM, Feng S, 'Bacteriophages and nuts; two routes to safe and healthy food', 2010 Agricultural Research Development Agency Conference : Food for Health, Beauty and Long-life, 1-4 September 2010, Bangkok, Thailand (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McNeil DL; Phua YM; Feng S

Thesis

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2012Kocharunchitt C, 'Effects of cold temperature and water activity stress on the physiology of Escherichia coli in relation to carcasses' (2012) [PhD]

[eCite] [Details]

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2013Kocharunchitt C, Ross T, 'Raw milk a risky business - Lab seeks clues to safer cheese', Cuppa TIA, Tasmanian Country, Hobart, Tasmania, Friday 19th April, p. 28. (2013) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ross T

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

6

Total funding

$2,434,116

Projects

Application of glucose as a novel approach for shelf-life extension of vacuum-packed chilled sheep meats (2021 - 2024)$428,930
Description
This project seeks to evaluate and develop glucose application as an effective and reliable intervention for shelf-life extension of vacuum-packed (VP) chilled sheep meats. Specifically, we will evaluate and optimise the potential of this intervention, including use of various lamb cuts from multiple sources at other storage temperatures to augment the evidence for addition of glucose as an intervention. Studies to evaluate the potential for further acidification of meat by lactic acid as an intervention for shelf-life extension are also important, i.e., to develop underpinning science to support the proposed intervention. The effectiveness of the proposed intervention on a commercial scale and how this affects the eating quality of VP lamb will also require rigorous investigation and optimization before commercial uptake.
Funding
Meat and Livestock Australia ($428,930)
Scheme
RFP J16417 - Extending shelf life of sheep meat
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kocharunchitt C; Ross T; Bowman JP; Pagnon JC; Mellefont LA
Period
2021 - 2024
Development of shelf life models for beef, lamb and pork (2021 - 2024)$698,496
Description
This project seeks to exploit the science underpinning red-meat shelf life and well-validated predictive models for shelf life of Australian vacuum-packed red meat in supply chains. Specifically, it will expand the applicability of existing models to predict shelf life of meat in other common packaging systems such as vacuum skin packs, modified atmosphere packs and overwrap trays. Due to recent advances in data logging and wireless communication, the project also intends to develop a user-friendly interface and/or app that can directly receive data from a temperature data logger via Bluetooth or Cloud systems and translate this into a useful information for industry QA managers in real time. The new knowledge and decision-support tool developed will bring innovation to the Australian red meat industry to monitor and manage cold chains for various products including those required for further processing. The tool would have equal utility in both short and long distribution chains and would be easily accessible by the industry across all sectors (i.e., processors, transport partners, retail customers etc.) to minimise associated losses and to maintain, or enhance, customer trust.
Funding
Meat and Livestock Australia ($698,496)
Scheme
RFP J16416 - Shelf life models for meat
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kocharunchitt C; Ross T; Bowman JP; Pagnon JC
Period
2021 - 2024
Development of a predictive model for vacuum-packed pork (2021 - 2023)$134,795
Description
The Australian pork industry aims to produce pork efficiently and sustainably to meet consumer demand, while assuring its high quality (freshness). This is constantly challenged by the need to minimise the loss of product quality (including shelf life) along different supply chains and to meet a wide range of shelf life-related specifications imposed by intended markets. Accordingly, being able to assure required quality remaining for product is critical for the success of the Australian pork industry.Through our previous projects with Meat and Livestock Australia, shelf-life predictive models for vacuum-packed (VP) beef and lamb were successfully developed based on the growth rate of microorganisms present and processes of spoilage (based on odour) as a function of temperature. The models have now been adopted by many red meat processors as a reliable and cost-effective decision-support tool for better management of their cold chains, i.e., to optimise product quality, to avoid an unexpected loss of quality, to reduce wastage, reduce the need for markdowns, and, more importantly, reduce customer complaints.To develop a model for shelf-life prediction of Australian VP pork, the proposed project aims to expand the applicability of the existing tool to quantify rates of spoilage of pork in VP. Specifically, we will systematically assess shelf-life of VP pork across storage temperature ranges to define its best-before dates. The data generated and the interpretation based on this can then be used to modify and/or refine the existing predictive models to enable reliable and accurate predictions of shelf life of VP pork. Achieving this, and being able to demonstrate its scientific basis, would enable the industry to further develop the APIQ Programme (i.e., standardising methodology used for shelf-life assessment and development of national standards), while having the ability to better understand and manage cold chains.****This project links back to the original tender from MLA that involved APL - RMBD-K28321
Funding
Australian Pork Limited ($134,795)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kocharunchitt C; Ross T; Bowman JP
Period
2021 - 2023
Evaluation and predictive modelling of shelf life of frozen beef products in different packaging systems (2019)$10,019
Description
Australian meat has a reputation around the world for excellent shelf life. The Australian meat industry produces meat products with shelf lives ranging from a few days (entire cuts and ground meats) or several months (vacuum-packed primals) to more than a year (frozen manufacturing meat). The industry services export markets by sending whole primals for further processing. They are usually portioned, into retail-ready packs in market.Emerging markets such as China are constantly looking for Australian-made products because they do not trust their own integrity system due to high levels of food fraud. This presents an opportunity for the industry to carry out the process within Australia and transporting retail-ready packs to market, however this also presents a challenge as shelf life extension is required due to increase transport time.Meat spoilage is a complex phenomenon involving interactions among growing microorganisms, various biochemical reactions and storage environment. However, the growth of these microorganisms and the processes of spoilage are predictable in a well-defined ecosystem. A current long-term study at the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture/University of Tasmania (TIA/UTas), funded by Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) has developed mathematical models to predict the effect of storage temperature on the shelf life of vacuum packed (VP) beef and lamb primals. These shelf life prediction models are now available for meat processors and exporters to use to predict the shelf life of chilled vacuum-packed beef and lamb in general with capability of being tailored to specific supply chains.The aim of this study is to determine the shelf life of various beef products (striploin steak, dices and mince) in different packaging systems (i.e., in Dar Fresh packaging and modified atmosphere packaging (80% O2 and 20% CO2)). The data generated will also be used to validate the TIA/MLA shelf life prediction models with a view to extending their utilisation to other packaging of beef products.
Funding
Argyle Food Group ($10,019)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kocharunchitt C; Ross T
Year
2019
Determination of the potential public health risks of pathogens in foods and water (2018)$25,332
Description
Tasmania enjoys a standard of food production that provides safe, high quality products to consumers. To this end, the Tasmanian Government provides microbiological testing services to local government, private businesses and individuals across the state through the Public Health Laboratory, of the Department of Health and Human Service. This is to ensure the continuation of (i) the protection of the safety and wellbeing of the public; (ii) Tasmania meeting minimum national standards; (iii) maintenance of access to interstate and international markets; and (iv) protection of Tasmanias reputation as a producer or processor of clean and safe food. Public Health Laboratory is currently interested in working with CFSI/TIA to determine the potential public health risks of pathogens in foods and water. This project will provide data that allows DHHS to regulate and monitor food safety issues in Tasmania as well as aiding the development and implementation of appropriate food safety policy and legislation. The proposed project will be undertaken at the Public Health Laboratory, a NATA-accredited laboratory. This project will involve testing various types of food and water from various sources for a range of pathogens specified by DHHS (e.g., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus etc.). The data generated will then form the basis of public health decisions and policy by DHHS.
Funding
Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania ($25,332)
Scheme
Consultancy
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kocharunchitt C
Year
2018
Principal research organisation in microbial ecology and physiology (2016 - 2020)$1,136,544
Description
Note CNT10761 applies to this project but is attached to T0021336 as it applies to both.
Funding
Meat and Livestock Australia ($1,136,544)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ross T; Bowman JP; Mellefont LA; Kocharunchitt C; Kaur M
Period
2016 - 2020

Research Supervision

Current

7

Completed

2

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDOxidants as an Antimicrobial Intervention on Escherichia coli during Carcase Chilling2013
PhDExploring Physiological Responses of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 to Abrupt Cold and Hyperosmotic Stress2013
PhDColonisation Dynamics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolates from the Food Production Environment2016
PhDEvaluation of the Efficacy of Oxidants to Reduce Pathogenic Bacteria on Carcasses During Chilling2017
PhDUnderstanding and Minimising Spoilage of Vacuum-Packaged Red Meat2018
MastersIdentifying and Understanding The Causes of Elevated Rates of Campylobacteriosis in Food Associated Contexts, From Atypical Sources (Including Animal Vectors and Food Handling Environs) in Australian Domestic and Retail Food Preparation Areas2018
PhDUnderstanding Potential Mechanisms of Red Meat Spoilage2021

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDCampylobacter Persistence in Poultry Processing
Candidate: Stanley Hao Chen
2020
PhDRisk Assessment of Norovirus on Shellfish from Indonesian Markets
Candidate: Radestya Triwibowo
2019