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Edward Hill

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Edward Hill

Research Fellow
Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre

Room 417E , Medical Science 1, level 4

+61 3 6226 4228 (phone)

e.hill@utas.edu.au

Edward Hill is a Research Fellow for the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre. Edward is interested in the epidemiology of neurodegenerative diseases, in particular the preventive potential of modifiable lifestyle risk factors in Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Biography

Edward completed a Bachelor of Science (Neuroscience) and honours degree at the University of Melbourne-Royal Melbourne Hospital and recently submitted his PhD investigating the preventive potential of diet in the preclinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease symptomatology.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, Australian Catholic University, Australia, 2019. Thesis: Preventive potential of diet in the pre-clinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease symptomatology
  • BSc (Hons), University of Melbourne – Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia, 2016. Thesis: The Role of Mediterranean Diet Adherence on Cognitive Function and Beta-Amyloid Deposition in Ageing Australian Women
  • BSc, Neuroscience, University of Melbourne, Australia, 2015.
  • BA, Sociology, University of Melbourne, Australia, 2012.

Memberships

Professional practice

Australasian Epidemiological Association (Current Student Representative)

Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment

NHMRC National Institute for Dementia Research

Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration

International Research Network for Dementia Prevention

Teaching

Teaching expertise

Biology, physiology and anatomy tutor (Human Body in Health & Disease I & II)

Research Appointments

Australasian Epidemiological Association (Council Member)

View more on Dr Edward Hill in WARP

Expertise

Edward’s research aligns to the University’s research theme of Better Health. His research interests include understanding how lifestyle behaviours contribute to risk of cognitive decline and investigating the preventative potential of modifiable risk factors to alleviate the clinical and physiological manifestations of neurodegenerative disease.

  • Epidemiology
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Modifiable lifestyle factors
  • Dementia prevention

Collaboration

Edward is collaborating with researchers from the Menzies Institute for Medical Research and from the Division of Psychology to obtain a cross-disciplinary approach to the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project.

Awards

Alzheimer's Association International Society to Advance Alzheimer's Research and Treatment – Student Travel Award (2017)

Current projects

Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project (NHMRC funded project)

Fields of Research

  • Nutrition and dietetics (321099)
  • Cognitive neuroscience (520203)
  • Central nervous system (320903)
  • Neurology and neuromuscular diseases (320905)
  • Geriatrics and gerontology (320210)
  • Health services and systems (420399)
  • Epidemiological methods (420204)
  • Neurosciences (320999)
  • Epidemiology (420299)
  • Primary health care (420319)
  • Applications in health (460102)
  • Preventative health care (420605)
  • Digital health (420302)
  • Analytical biochemistry (310101)
  • Sensor technology (incl. chemical aspects) (340108)
  • Speech recognition (460212)

Research Objectives

  • Mental health (200409)
  • Clinical health (200199)
  • Nutrition (200410)
  • Preventive medicine (200412)
  • Health related to ageing (200502)
  • Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions (200101)
  • Health education and promotion (200203)
  • Prevention of human diseases and conditions (200104)
  • Public health (excl. specific population health) (200499)
  • Artificial intelligence (220403)
  • Injury prevention and control (200408)
  • Health inequalities (200204)

Publications

Total publications

15

Journal Article

(10 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Bindoff AD, Summers MJ, Hill E, Alty J, Vickers JC, 'Studying at university in later life slows cognitive decline: A long-term prospective study', Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions pp. 1-10. ISSN 2352-8737 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/trc2.12207 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bindoff AD; Alty J; Vickers JC

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2021Collins JM, Hill E, Bindoff A, King AE, Alty J, et al., 'Association Between Components of Cognitive Reserve and Serum BDNF in Healthy Older Adults', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 13 pp. 1-9. ISSN 1663-4365 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2021.725914 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Collins JM; Bindoff A; King AE; Alty J; Summers MJ; Vickers JC

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2021Shang X, Hill E, Li Y, He M, 'Energy and macronutrient intakes at breakfast and cognitive declines in community-dwelling older adults: a 9-year follow-up cohort study', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: A Journal Reporting The Practical Application of Our World-Wide Knowledge of Nutrition ISSN 0002-9165 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa403 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

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2020Shang X, Peng W, Hill E, Szoeke C, He M, et al., 'Incidence, progression, and patterns of multimorbidity in community- dwelling middle-aged men and women', Frontiers in Public Health, 8 Article 404. ISSN 2296-2565 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00404 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3

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2019Hill E, Goodwill AM, Gorelik A, Szoeke C, 'Diet and biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis', Neurobiology of Aging, 76 pp. 45-52. ISSN 0197-4580 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.12.008 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21

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2019Hill E, Hodge A, Clifton P, Shivappa N, Hebert JR, et al., 'Longitudinal nutritional changes in aging Australian women', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 28, (1) pp. 139-149. ISSN 0964-7058 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.6133/apjcn.201903_28(1).0019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

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2019Shang X, Peng W, Hill E, Szoeke C, He M, et al., 'Incidence of medication-treated depression and anxiety associated with long-term cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and osteoarthritis in community-dwelling women and men', EClinicalMedicine pp. 1-9. ISSN 2589-5370 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.eclinm.2019.08.010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 2

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2019Szoeke C, Goodwill AM, Gorelik A, Dennerstein L, Caeyenberghs K, et al., 'Apolipoprotein E4 mediates the association between midlife dyslipidemia and cerebral amyloid in aging women', Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 68, (1) pp. 105-114. ISSN 1387-2877 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3233/JAD-180815 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Simpson Jr S

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2018Hill E, Clifton P, Goodwill AM, Dennerstein L, Campbell S, et al., 'Dietary patterns and β-amyloid deposition in aging Australian women', Alzheimer's & Dementia, 4 pp. 535-541. ISSN 1552-5260 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.trci.2018.09.007 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8

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2018Hill E, Szoeke C, Dennerstein L, Campbell S, Clifton P, 'Adherence to the Mediterranean diet Is not related to beta-amyloid deposition: data from the Women's Healthy Ageing Project', Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease, 5, (2) pp. 137-141. ISSN 2274-5807 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.14283/jpad.2018.12 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 6

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Conference Publication

(5 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Hill E, Collins J, Bindoff A, King A, Alty J, et al., 'Increased age and higher levels of cognitive reserve are associated with lower serum BDNF levels in healthy older adults', Australian Dementia Forum 2021, 31 May - 1 June, virtual (2021) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Collins J; Bindoff A; King A; Alty J; Summers M; Vickers J

2020Bartlett L, Doherty K, Farrow M, Bindoff A, Kim S, et al., 'Poster - The island study linking ageing and neurodegenerative disease (ISLAND): a longitudinal public health research program targeting dementia risk reduction', 2020 Alzheimer's Association International Conference, 26-30 July 2020, Online (2020) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bartlett L; Doherty K; Farrow M; Bindoff A; Kim S; Eccleston C; Alty J; King E; Vickers JC

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2020Bartlett L, Doherty K, Farrow M, Bindoff A, Kim S, et al., 'The Island Study Linking Ageing and Neurodegenerative Disease (ISLAND): A longitudinal public health research program targeting dementia risk reduction', Alzheimer's & Dementia ISSN 1552-5260 (2020) [Conference Extract]

DOI: 10.1002/alz.045539 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bartlett L; Doherty K; Farrow M; Bindoff A; Kim S; Eccleston C; Alty JE; King AE; Vickers JC

Tweet

2020Hill E, Bindoff A, Bartlett L, Summers MJ, Vickers JC, 'Exploring uptake of a university-level educational intervention to prevent cognitive decline and reduce dementia risk: The Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project', Alzheimer's & Dementia ISSN 1552-5260 (2020) [Conference Extract]

DOI: 10.1002/alz.045477 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bindoff A; Bartlett L; Summers MJ; Vickers JC

Tweet

2020Hill E, Bindoff IK, Bartlett L, Summers MJ, Vickers JC, 'Exploring uptake of a university-level educational intervention to prevent cognitive decline and reduce dementia risk: the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project', Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2020, 27 - 31 July 2020, virtual (2020) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bindoff IK; Bartlett L; Summers MJ; Vickers JC

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

1

Total funding

$899,782

Projects

The future in our hands: Screening for preclinical Alzheimer's disease by analysing hand movements (2021 - 2025)$899,782
Description
Global dementia prevalence is rising. Alzheimers disease (AD), the most common cause, has devastating effects on peoples quality of life. AD has a preclinical (pre-AD) period of 1020 years when brain pathology silently progresses before any cognitive symptoms appear. Current tests for pre-AD are invasive, costly and unsuitable for screening at population level. If we cant identify people with pre-AD, we cant offer them early interventions. This hinders our strategies to reduce AD prevalence. We will develop a new scalable test (HandTest) by combining two innovative ideas: hand-movement tests to detect pre-AD >10 years before cognitive symptoms begin; and computer vision so people can self-test online at home. This unique approach builds on the recent discoveries that the posterior cingulate cortex (the first brain region to show abnormalities in pre-AD) is involved in hand-movement control, and that hand-movement patterns change in pre-AD. We will use exquisitely precise computer vision methods to automatically analyse movement data from thousands of participants, who complete the online test by simply opening and closing their hands repeatedly for 5 minutes in front of a standard computer, tablet or smartphone camera. The CI/AI team of experts in hand-movement analysis, pre-AD, computer vision, AD biomarkers and biostatistics has access to 3 well-phenotyped cohorts, >10,000 existing participants and a cutting-edge assay for a blood AD biomarker, ptau181. We will develop a HandTest algorithm to classify hand-movement data for pre-AD risk. In a longitudinal cohort we will determine HandTests precision to prospectively predict 5-year risks of cognitive decline and AD. This is the critical first step for up-scaling HandTest nationwide via memory clinics of the Australian Dementia Network. With worldwide access to computers, tablets and smartphones increasing, HandTest is scalable globally, potentially transforming dementia prevention and management.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($899,782)
Scheme
Grant-Ideas
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Alty JE; Vickers JC; Bai Q; Bindoff AD; Hill E
Period
2021 - 2025
Grant Reference
2004051

Edward is currently available for HDR supervision.