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Maneesh Kuruvilla

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Maneesh Kuruvilla

Lecturer
Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre

Room Level 4, room 421B , Medical Science 1

03 6226 4209 (phone)

maneesh.kuruvilla@utas.edu.au

Dr Maneesh Kuruvilla is a Lecturer in Dementia at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre. His teaching and research interests involve the role of the hippocampal formation in navigation and episodic memory - across animals and humans - in informing our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease.

Biography

Maneesh is an Early Career Researcher, with a PhD in Behavioural Neuroscience from the University of St Andrews (Scotland). In 2018, Maneesh was awarded the Principal’s Medal – the highest honour at the University of St Andrews – for excellence in research and science communication. Following his PhD, Maneesh held post-doctoral positions at the University of St Andrews and Australian National University. His research has been supported by the Wellcome Trust and Alzheimer’s Research UK. In 2019, Maneesh was appointed as a Lecturer in Dementia at the University of Tasmania.

Career summary

Qualifications

Degree

Thesis Title

University

Country

Date of Award

PhD

The role of entorhinal cortex in processing environmental features

University of St Andrews

Scotland

2018

BSc (Honours)

Calling time on episodic memory – the use of ‘when’ versus ‘how long ago’ time strategies in temporal processing of episodic memories by rats and humans

University of St Andrews

Scotland

2014

Administrative expertise

Maneesh is the unit co-ordinator for the Neurobiology of Dementia stream (CAD502, CAD602, CAD702) in the Masters of Dementia Program.

Teaching

Teaching expertise

Maneesh has extensive undergraduate and postgraduate teaching experience in psychology and neuroscience across the University of St Andrews (UK), Australian National University and the University of Tasmania. At the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, Maneesh has been instrumental in designing, developing and co-ordinating units in the Masters of Dementia Program for both the Neurobiology of Dementia and Public Health and Dementia streams. Maneesh is a Guest Lecturer in the Neuropsychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Course (Honours Pathway Course) at the Australian National University.

Teaching responsibility

https://www.utas.edu.au/courses/chm/units/cad502-neurobiology-of-dementia-1

https://www.utas.edu.au/courses/chm/units/cad602-neurobiology-of-dementia-2

https://www.utas.edu.au/courses/chm/units/cad702-advanced-topics-in-the-neurobiology-of-dementia

View more on Mr Maneesh Kuruvilla in WARP

Expertise

  • Hippocampus
  • Entorhinal cortex
  • Navigation
  • Episodic Memory
  • Alzheimer’s disease

Research Themes

Maneesh’s research aligns to the University’s research theme of Better Health. His research interests include understanding how navigation and memory are supported by the brain and how these processes are impacted in neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Maneesh’s particular brain area of interest is the entorhinal cortex, which shows the earliest signs of Alzheimer’s disease pathology and is closely implicated in how we remember the locations of places as well as events from our lives. Maneesh has expertise in behavioural research spanning rodents to humans with cross-species publications in globally recognised journals.

Fields of Research

  • Behavioural neuroscience (520202)
  • Aged health care (420301)
  • Health and community services (420305)
  • Behavioural epidemiology (420201)
  • Neurology and neuromuscular diseases (320905)
  • Virtual and mixed reality (460708)

Research Objectives

  • Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions (200101)
  • Provision of health and support services (200399)
  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Expanding knowledge in the information and computing sciences (280115)

Publications

  • Kuruvilla, M. V., Wilson, D. I. G., & Ainge, J. A. (2020). Lateral entorhinal cortex lesions impair both egocentric and allocentric object-place associations. Brain and Neuroscience Advances https://doi.org/10.1177/2398212820939463
  • Kuruvilla, M. V., O’Connor, A. R., & Ainge, J. A. (2020). Distance- rather than location-based temporal judgments are more accurate during episodic recall in a real-world task. Memory https://doi.org/10.1080/09658211.2020.1783319
  • Kuruvilla, M. V., & Ainge, J. A. (2017). Lateral entorhinal cortex lesions impair local spatial framework. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 11, 30. https://doi:10.3389/fnsys.2017.00030
  • Haushofer, J., Collins, M., de Guisti, G., Njoroge, J. M., Odero, A., Onyago, C., Vancel, J., Jang, C., Kuruvilla, M.V., & Hughes, C. (2014). The Busara Center: a laboratory environment for developing countries. SSRN http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2155217

Total publications

1

Journal Article

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Kuruvilla MV, O'Connor AR, Ainge JA, 'Distance- rather than location-based temporal judgments are more accurate during episodic recall in a real-world task', Memory, 28, (6) pp. 783-794. ISSN 0965-8211 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/09658211.2020.1783319 [eCite] [Details]

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Research Supervision

Current

3

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDEarly Detection of Dementia Using Testing Tools in VR/AR Environment2020
PhDREM Sleep Behaviour Disorder: Prevalence and cognitive characteristics2020
PhDInhibiting Axon Degeneration Through SARM-1 Knockout in Traumatic Brain Injury2020