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Research Projects

The CRH undertakes a range of research projects. Below is a list of projects grouped by theme area.

Theme Area 1: Rural health workforce development (including recruitment and retention strategies)

Rural health workforce development
Description

The Regional Bereavement Care Networks and Initiatives (BCN) project aimed to improve bereavement care and support in Tasmania. The longer-term goal was to enable all members of the Tasmanian community who experience grief and bereavement to be supported through the establishment of sustainable regional bereavement care networks across the state. The objectives of the BCN project were to:

  1. Establish and provide time-limited support to sustainable and functional bereavement care networks in the North, North West and Southern regions of Tasmania;
  2. Develop Statewide Practice Standards (or equivalent), in consultation with network members;
  3. Develop a communication strategy to raise awareness of and access to existing bereavement care services and supports;
  4. Identify capacity building and skill development activities for network members;
  5. Develop an evaluation framework, to support ongoing and future evaluation of the BCN.
Partners
  • DHHS
  • Palliative Care Tasmania and;
  • others
Funding Source
  • DHHS
  • TCF
Start/End Dates 2016 - 2020
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

There is a shortage of Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) in many rural areas of Australia. Contributing to this shortage is staff turn-over or churn. A high turn-over of staff has some benefits but also a cost. Losing highly skilled and experienced staff, especially those with a great deal of local knowledge built up over a period of years, can impact on service provision, continuity of care, and patient outcomes.

A health professional may be attracted to a rural area and recruited by an employer – but what makes them stay for the longer term? Retention of an individual relies on a combination of different personal, professional and work-related factors. All of these may change over time though must be balanced or the reasons to stay may be outweighed by the pressure or incentive to leave.

This study aims to identify and better understand factors that keep allied health care professionals working in rural and remote areas of Tasmania. The study commenced in 2015 and involved an on-line survey component then a follow-up interview with those participants interested in talking about what has kept them working in a rural or remote area for 5 years or more.

Research into retention (and not just recruitment) issues will broaden our knowledge of strategies that will help retain and sustain an experienced allied health workforce in rural areas. Ultimately, “keeping them” can strengthen rural health service delivery and improve the health of rural communities.

Partners
  • DHHS
  • Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2016 - 2019
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

Designing the most appropriate dental workforce for the future is critical to ensure “the right number of people with the right skills are in the right place at the right time to provide the right services to the right people”. This project will review the literature on skill-mix in dentistry and discuss workforce re-design in the rural and remote oral health workforce.

Partners OHTS/APHCRI CRE in Primary Oral Health
Funding Source APHCRI
Start and End Dates 2017 - 2019
Project Leader Tony Barnett
MembersHa Hoang
Rural health workforce development
Description

Over the past decade, there has been a substantial increase in the number of tertiary institutions offering accredited courses for nursing and allied health professionals and an increase in the number of places available within these courses. As a result, record numbers of qualified health professionals are now entering the health workforce. There is emerging concern, however, that the health workforce may be entering a phase of oversupply, whereby stagnant levels of employment are failing to keep pace with the increasing numbers of nursing and allied health professionals being trained. This perceived oversupply of health professionals may be more a case of maldistribution, whereby the majority of recent graduates want to work in metropolitan areas where suitable positions are scarce.

A review of the literature has found a lack of research exploring how many or what type of vacancies are available in rural and remote locations for recently graduated nursing and allied healthcare professionals.  Further, it is not known what strategies employers use to recruit recent graduates to positions, or indeed if recent graduates are even eligible to apply. Anecdotal evidence suggests that many direct patient care positions require ‘experience’ which naturally precludes recent graduates. Consequently, many positions may remain unfilled, with or without temporary measures being put in place to meet service needs.

In an effort to address this gap in knowledge, this study aims to quantify and profile graduate employment opportunities for nursing and allied health professionals across Tasmania; a state that is largely rural.  The study also aims to examine the recruitment experiences of employers seeking nursing and allied health professionals with a particular focus on the identification of barriers to the employment of recent graduates and to ascertain those conditions under which a recent graduate could be employed (especially to positions in rural or remote settings).  Finally, this study also aims to explore the pathways that recent graduates found successful in obtaining employment in their relevant field.

Partners PhD Studnent Project (*) - part
Funding Source RHMT (carry forward)
Start and End Dates 2018 - 2020
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

This study aims to examine changes in the type and load of bacteria in the mouth after a period of daily oral care, and to document the impact of this period of daily oral care on the risk for aspiration pneumonia and ill health for adults living in residential care.

Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Partners PhD student project (*)
Start and End Dates 2016 - 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

Bowel cancer is the second most common internal cancer after prostate cancer, with one in 12 Australians developing the disease by age 85. Around 80 Australians die each week from bowel cancer making it the second most common cause of cancer-related death after lung cancer.
When bowel cancer is detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate is as high as 93%. Unfortunately, only 39% of invited participants currently complete the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) kit.

Research shows that general practitioner (GP) endorsement is a key predictor for bowel cancer screening uptake. However, the current NBCSP invitation system does not involve GPs, making it difficult for them to know if and when a patient has received a faecal occult blood test (FOBT) kit in the mail, and in turn, play a role in screening behaviour.

This study therefore aims to determine whether a clinical prompt delivered to GPs at point-of-care, can increase bowel cancer screening participation in patients who are eligible to receive a NBCSP kit.

Partners
  • Deakin University
  • DHHS-TAS
  • THS
Funding Source Cancer Council (Tas)
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Simone Lee
Members
External Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

This PhD project aims to investigate the relationship of dental practitioners to primary care workers and their networks in rural and remote Queensland and the potential of technology (such as intra oral cameras) to help manage dental conditions in the outback.

Partners
  • PhD student project (*)
  • RFDS (Queensland)
  • Health services (Queensland)
Funding Source
  • APHCRI
  • Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2013 - 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Rural health workforce development
Description

In  order to support immigrant health professionals working in rural areas to deal  with the emotional stress caused by their job, their relocation and their  family situation, this pilot study aims at evaluating the impact of a  customised online peer-support group for them and a dedicated online peer  support group for the ‘trailing spouses’.

Partners

Masters student project (*)

Start and End Dates Feb 2019 to 2021
Project Leader Ha Hoang
Members

Theme Area 2: Rural training strategies

Rural training strategies
Description

This project identifies the factors enabling and constraining work-integrated learning in rural practice settings in Tasmania, from the perspectives of rural health service providers and placement coordinators in the College of Health and Medicine.

The study design was exploratory, the sampling purposive. We collected data via semi-structured interviews with 18 public and private placement providers (RNs, GPs and community pharmacists) and 12 placement coordinators in the disciplines of Medicine, Nursing, Paramedicine, Pharmacy, Psychology and Social Work. The data were analysed for content and recurring thematic patterns.

Key findings reflect similarities and differences between perspectives and across disciplines. There was almost universal consensus that rural and remote placements afford a diverse range of learning opportunities including care across the life span, insight into holistic care, opportunities to see the determinants of health in practice and to learn about the rural health care system. Relationships with the university varied between disciplines; some placement providers considering this pivotal to building and sustaining placement capacity. For placement providers, factors constraining rural and remote placements included fluctuating learning opportunities, lean, unstable staffing, reliance on locums, organisational change, supervisory capacity and student interest. For placement coordinators the variable availability of learning opportunities and supervisory capacity were the major constraints, followed by systemic constraints both regulatory and within the College, financial and material supports available to students, negative attitudes of some academics towards rural practice and placements and student interest.

Currently, we are further analysing the results to flag the implications for strategic placement planning, specific disciplines, the need to promote the benefits of rural placements to staff and students and planning to publish and disseminate results.

Partners
  • Faculty of Health placement coordinators
  • RHTS Directors
  • Rural Health Practitioners
  • Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT Carry forward
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2018
Project Leader Merylin Cross
Members
Rural training strategies
Description

Dietary flavonoids, which are natural compounds providing the colourful pigmentation in plant-based foods like fruits, as flavonoid consumption is consistently linked to a improvements in cognitive performance and improved cardiovascular outcomes. To date, we have several population-based estimates of flavonoids in adult Australian populations, but intake in adolescents in unknown. Using the Raine study data, we will describe Australian adolescent flavonoid intake for the first time and then link flavonoid intake to cognitive performance and cardio-metabolic health in this group.

This study is one of the largest successful prospective cohorts of pregnancy, childhood, adolescence and now early adulthood to be carried out anywhere in the world.

Partners The Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study
Start and End Dates 1 Jan 2017 – 30 Dec 2019
Project Leader Katherine Kent
External Members
Rural training strategies
Description

This project is being conducted by Dr Katherine Kent, Ashley Hoogesteger, Sandra Murray and Stuart Auckland, from the Centre for Rural Health and School of Health Sciences at the University of Tasmania, and Dr Stephanie Godrich, Lauren Blekkenhorst and Dr Johnny Lo at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia.

The research project is a joint initiative between the Centre for Rural Health at the University of Tasmania and the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University (Western Australia). The project aims to measure and compare the consumption of regionally grown fresh fruits and vegetables, and to identify the barriers and enablers to access and consumption of these foods in two areas of Australia, namely south west Western Australia and Tasmania. The research project will provide comparative data that will assist in benchmarking the consumption of regionally grown fresh fruits and vegetables between these regions. Additionally, by determining the major barriers and enablers to accessing and consuming regionally grown fresh fruits and vegetables will assist with identifying gaps and opportunities for improving the consumption these foods.

Partners EatWell Tasmania
Start and End Dates Jan 2017 – Dec 2018
Project Leader Katherine Kent
Members
External Members
Rural training strategies
Description

This study will explore how interprofessional learning opportunities could be formalised, optimised, and supported within the rural clinical learning environment to promote students’ preparedness for interprofessional practice.

Partners PhD student project (*)
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2021
Project Leader Merylin Cross
Members
Rural training strategies
Description

Addiction to over-the–counter (OTC) codeine is recognized as a growing problem, both in Australia and overseas.  The high level of concern regarding OTC codeine misuse in Australia is evidenced by the Australian government’s decision to reschedule codeine to prescription only status from February 2018.

There are few existing studies that specifically focus on addiction to OTC codeine and little is known about OTC codeine misusers themselves.  They have been described as ‘respectable addicts’, as many aim to maintain their professional, intelligent identity and consider themselves very different to stereotypical illicit drug users.  Using Q methodology, this PhD study aims to explore OTC codeine addicts’ perspectives on their addiction and to situate their views within the formal theories of addiction. The research will contribute to our understanding of OTC codeine addiction and the findings may be used to inform tailored prevention, risk reduction and treatment interventions for this distinct type of addict.

Partners
  • PhD student project (Melissa Kirshbaum)
  • School of Health Sciences
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2015 to 2019
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural training strategies
Description

Inter-professional Learning in Paramedic Practice - Commenced July 2011, this PhD project investigates how and under the conditions which inter-professional learning occurs in paramedic practice.

Partners
  • Tas. Ambulance
  • PhD student project
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2014 to 2019
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural training strategies
Description

To identify recruitment and retention strategies for health care professional and teachers in rural and remote areas.

Partners University of Canberra
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Tony Barnett
MembersKehinde Obamiro
Rural training strategies
Description

The project will examine the barriers and enablers to the provision of supervision from the perspectives of rural psychology supervisors.

Funding Source Summer Scholarship
Start and End Dates 2018 - 2019
Project Leader Heather Bridgman
Members

Jon Mond

Rural training strategies
Description

This evaluation will examine the impact of an after hours palliative care phone support service in N/NW Tasmania form the perspectives of service providers, stakeholders and consumers who have used the service.

Partners THS, DHS
Funding Source DHHS
Start and End Dates 2019
Project Leader Heather Bridgman
Members
Rural training strategies
Description

Remote Clinical Skills Training Of Health Care Professionals and Students Using Augmented Reality Technology: A randomized control trial.

Partners PhD student project (*), CIT
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2021
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Rural training strategies
Description 
Partners PhD student project (*) - part
Funding Source RHMT carry forward
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Belinda Jessup
Members

Theme Area 3: Innovative rural service delivery models to enable the provision of health services to meet community needs

Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

At a state level, Tasmania has the second highest National Bowel Cancer Screening Program participation rates in the country after South Australia (42.5% vs 44% respectively), however marked geographical differences in participation rates have been observed within Tasmania.

Encouragingly, analysis of 2012-2013 data by Local Government Area (LGA) found almost half the people in King Island who were invited to screen for bowel cancer participated (47.1%), followed closely by Latrobe (43.5%), Break O’Day (41.9%) and Tasman (41.0%). These rates rank as some of the highest in Australia. In contrast, Brighton (28.5%) Central Highlands (30.7%), West Coast (31.6%), and George Town (31.7%) had the lowest rates of bowel screening participation in Tasmania.

This study aims to elucidate the reasons for disparate bowel cancer screening rates in Tasmania with the view to developing future strategies for increased uptake.

Partners LGA's
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2019
Project Leader Simone Lee
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

The scoping review examines the range and extent of qualitative, quantitative and grey literature, focusing on factors influencing participation in colorectal cancer screening in Australia using faecal occult blood testing.

A socio-ecological model will guide the inclusion criteria and map the data, ensuring a focus on individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and public policy as factors that can influence health behaviour. This will deliver a comprehensive scoping of literature that includes but is not limited to socio-demographic data, personal and cultural beliefs, perceptions of risk and self-efficacy; influence of family and friends; client-directed interventions; the role of health care providers; the role of local government and community organisations; the Australian health system and the workings of the screening program per se.

The results will identify gaps in the evidence and inform future systematic reviews and research.

Partners Deakin University
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Simone Lee
Members
External Members Vincent Versace (Deakin University)
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project compares the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride treatments with the standard treatment of fillings and extractions on children with tooth decay waiting for general anesthetics.

Partners OHS-TAS/Southern Dental Industries Ltd
Funding Source
  • Tasmanian Community Fund: Grant
  • Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This  RCT is comparing three forms of silver diamine fluoride treatments compared to sodium fluoride for the arrest of dental caries in primary teeth of children 8 years of age and younger.

Partners
  • Southern Dental Industries Ltd
  • Oral  Health Services Tasmania
Funding Source
  • Southern  Dental Industries P/L: Clinical
  • Oral Health Services Tasmania inkind contribution
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This study explores the barriers and enablers to providing effective ASD early intervention within a hub and spokes service delivery model, (emphasis on staff support needs, organisational culture, built environment and the impact of geographical remoteness), with the aim of building capacity in rural community day care to deliver early intervention to children with Autism supported by a regional multidisciplinary specialist service.

Partners
  • PF and HDR
  • ASELCC
  • RCS
Funding Source St Giles Society
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2018
Project Leader Lyndsay Quarmby
MembersMerylin Cross
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This scoping project aims to explore, understand and document best practice in hospice design, structure, and resourcing particularly in areas of small to medium, decentralised populations.

Partners Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates February 2018 – February 2019
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
External Members Elizabeth Giles
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are among the three most common developmental disabilities affecting children, with current prevalence rates at 1-2% of the population. The average age of diagnosis is 4.1 years in Australia (including Tasmania). Although it is a lifelong disorder, early intervention through early diagnosis provides the best opportunity to support improved developmental outcomes.  The Centre for Rural Health is partnering with the Olga Tennison Autism Research  Centre (OTARC), La Trobe University, the Autism Cooperative Research Centre and Child health and Parenting Service (CHaPS), Department of Health and Human Services to deliver a two year state-wide project monitoring infant and toddlers social attention and communication development to prospectively identify infants and toddlers (12-24 months) ‘at risk’ of an Autism Spectrum Disorder during their routine universal child health assessments.

Partners
  • Autism CRC
  • DHHS-TAS
  • THS-Tas
  • La Trobe University
Funding Source
  • Autism CRC
  • Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2019
Project Leader Lyndsay Quarmby
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This PhD project is to ascertain reasons why homeless people do not access dental care.

Partners PhD student project
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2015 to 2018
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This PhD Project is investigating the associations between obesity, diet, and dental disease.

Partners PhD student's project (*)
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This review reports on the factors associated with preventable dental hospital admissions (PDHA) in Australia. This review will assist policy makers to understand the causes of PDHA, to find methods to prevent PDHA thereby reducing costs associated with PDHA.

Partners Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
MembersHa Hoang
External Members Abhinav Acharya
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

There are now an estimated 258 million people living in a country other than their country of birth. Despite the notable increase in the numbers of migrants from diverse backgrounds to developed countries in the world, little is known about the dental health of migrants, their oral health behaviours or their oral health needs. This review will identify and synthesise the available evidence regarding the oral health needs of and the oral health promotion programmes providing for CALD older migrants in developed countries.

Partners Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Project Leader Ha Hoang
Members
External Members
  • Tanya Lynden
  • Suzanne Feike
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This study will be valuable in helping nursing and care staff in residential aged care communities understand the importance of daily oral care for residents and the relationship between the type and load of oral bacteria, oral health, reduced risk of aspiration pneumonia, and increased overall health, particularly for people with dementia.

Partners TRIP fellowship
Funding Source NHMRC
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

Sustained Effective Oral Care to Significantly Reduce Aspiration Pneumonia experienced by Adults with Dementia in Residential Care.

Partners TCF
Funding Source TCF
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2018
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

Psychological and spiritual experiences of either caring for a family member or friend until their death at home, or of receiving community palliative care at home as a patient.  It explores individual experiences of palliation at home in a rural area of Tasmania with a view to understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the palliative care system. This study aims to identify and understand factors that enable, sustain, modify and/or oppose access to adequate and appropriate palliative care in rural Tasmania.

Partners Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2019
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
MembersJon Mond
External Members Stephanie Thompson
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description 
Partners
  • School of Health Sciences
  • PhD student project (*)
Funding Source Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Start and End Dates 2011 to 2019
Project Leader Merylin Cross
MembersTony Barnett
External Members Deborah Zwolsman *
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project explores residential aged care facility residents’ use of communal garden sites as spaces for gardening and socialising.

Partners
  • Wicking Centre for Dementia Research
  • DIGnity Inc.
  • Health Practitioner Research Development Program
Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2021
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
External Members
  • Helen Courtney Pratt
  • Hannah Fielder
  • Sue Pearson
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This PhD project aims to explore mental health experiences of marginalised people living in rural or remote Tasmania, the barriers and enablers that influence their access to mental health care.

Partners Macquarie University
Funding Source PhD project (*)
Start and End Dates March 2018 to March 2021
Project Leader Ha Hoang
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

When detected early, the 5-year survival rate for bowel cancer is 93%, compared with 8% for people diagnosed with stage 4 bowel cancer. Unfortunately, only 22 % of bowel cancer patients in Australia are diagnosed at an early stage.

Low early detection rates may reflect low participation in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), and/or delays in diagnostic colonoscopy.

Partners LGA's
Funding Source UTAS: Data, Knowledge Decision Research Theme, 2018 Seed Grant
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Simone Lee
MembersKehinde Obamiro
External Members
  • Jan Radford
  • Vincent Versace
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This PhD project seeks to improve and maintain the oral health of people who move into residential aged care by providing an objective way to document they are receiving effective oral care.  It the process it hopes to find a bacterial indicator of whether someone is likely to develop inspiration pneumonia.

Funding Source
  • Wrigley Company Foundation ADHF Community Service Grant.  US$6,000.
  • College of Health and Medicine. 2018 Research Enhancement Program: Stimulus funding for cross-disciplinary or cross-centre/Institute/School research. Developing a protocol to predicting health outcomes through oral microbes. $9,917.
  • Tasmanian Community Fund. Improving the Oral Health of Tasmanians in Residential Aged Care. $28,336.
Partners

Two Residential Aged Care Facilities in Launceston

Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This PhD project aims to better understand why adults who are experiencing homelessness do or don’t visit the dentist and to find out what would make it easier to get dental care and advice.

Partners Aust Gov. Research Training Program (RTP)
Funding Source PhD Project (*)
Start and End Dates February 2017 to February 2020
Project Leader Tony Barnett
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

The evaluation project is part of the National Suicide Prevention Trail of which the three Tasmanian sites are part of a network of 13 sites Nationally. The main aim of the National Suicide Prevention Trial is to gather evidence to further understanding of what strategies are most effective in preventing suicide at a local level and in at-risk populations. Evaluation is a key stage in achieving this aim. The evaluation will focus on three triall sites located in regional Tasmania and will focus on suicide prevention activities targeting men aged 40-64 with men and women aged 65+).  Each of the sites will design and implement a series of activities based on the LifeSpan model. The local evaluation will complement the National evaluation and will be based on both process and outcome level evaluations, centred on the main objective of the evaluation.

Partners University of Melbourne
Funding Source Primary Health Tasmania
Start and End Dates August 2018 to December 2019
Project Leader
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

The Community Response to Eliminating Suicide (CORES) program is a community-based suicide prevention program that was initially established through funding from the Tasmanian Community Fund and commenced in 2003. The program was established as a community response to a significant increase in the number of suicides in the Kentish community within a short period of time. Central to the operation of the CORES program is the delivery of suicide prevention training and mentoring activities by skilled trainers and the creation of local CORES networks comprising local community members.

The project scope relates to the evaluation of activities associated with the establishment and operation of the two Tasmanian programs namely Devonport and Launceston.

Partners James Cook Univeristy
Funding Source National Mental Health Council
Start and End Dates October 2018 to June 2020
Project Leader
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project is a preliminary trial of the use of social network analysis in elucidating connectedness among individuals involved in eating disorders health promotion, prevention and treatment activities.

Funding Source RHMT
Start and End Dates July 2018 to June 2019
Project Leader Jon Mond
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project is a preliminary trial of the use of social network analysis in elucidating connectedness among individuals involved in eating disorders health promotion, prevention and treatment activities.

Project Leader Leonard Crocombe
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

Qualitative research project involving participants in a supported community gardening environment who were either living with the impacts of dementia themselves, or in a caring role.

Partners Wicking Centre for Dementia Research
Funding Source University of Tasmania: Grant CCS Research Theme
Start and End Dates October 2017 to October 2018
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
External Members
  • Marina Campbell
  • Helen Courtney Pratt
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

Recent data showed that Tasmania has a higher number of heart disease deaths per 100,000 people compared with the overall national rate. Tasmania also has highest rate of obesity and the second-highest smoking rate. Consequently, we aim to assess Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk awareness and identify determinants of CVD health-checks in the Tasmanian population.

Start and End Dates June 2018 to April 2019
Project Leader Kehinde Obamiro
Members
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

The proposed research will evaluate the outcomes of the Cross Cultural Conservation (CCC) Program,  run by Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) in partnership with the  TasTAFE. The overarching  research question is:

What  are the benefits of participating in CVA conservation activities for people  from migrant, refugee and asylum seeker backgrounds?

Partners Conversation Volunteers Australia
Funding Source Conversation Volunteers Australia
Start and End Dates 2019
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

In Tasmania, bowel cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed type of cancer. Appropriately prescribed exercise during cancer treatment is recommended as an important component of cancer care, yet few people take up exercise during their treatment. Often the reasons given for not exercising during cancer treatment are access to experts and affordability. This study will explore the effectiveness of exercise counselling delivered by an Accredited Exercise Physiologist using app-based technology in people with bowel cancer, informing the establishment of home-based bowel cancer exercise services supported by the University of Tasmania Exercise Physiology Clinic. Strategies that enable greater access to expert exercise programming and education, such as the use of technology, have the potential to reduce the burden of cancer care which offers significant benefits for people across Tasmania.

Funding Source Cancer Council
Start and End Dates 2019
Project Leader Sibella Hardcastle
Members Simone Lee
External Members
  • Celcilia Kitic
  • Andrew Williams
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description 
Partners UTAS College of Science and Environment, Tasmania Fire Service, Break O’Day Council/ Neighbourhood Houses, Red Cross
Funding Source UTAS College of Science and Environment
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Merylin Cross
Members
External Members A Harwood
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

The  study has been designed to investigate bowel cancer awareness level in Tasmania  and to identify the population subgroup with low awareness for necessary  educational intervention.

Partners Cancer Council (TAS)
Funding Source Deakin University
Start and End Dates 2019
Project Leader Kehinde Obamiro
Members Simone Lee
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project explores the experiences of persons living with dementia who have had access to a range of community-based green spaces and compare access, barriers and effects of engagement.

Partners Wicking Institute
Funding Source Wicking Institute
Start and End Dates 2018 to 2021
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
External Members
  • Helen Courtney Pratt
  • Nikoli Mmako
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This randomised, within subject cross-over pilot study aims to quantify the acute dose-dependent changes in intact anthocyanins (such as cyanidin-3-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-rutinoside and pelargonin-3-rutinoside) and phenolic acid metabolites (such as vanillic acid, hippuric acid, ferulic acid) in biological specimens (urine, faecal matter) over 24 hours after consumption of 200 g and 500 g anthocyanin-rich Tasmanian sweet cherries (‘Lapins’).

It is hypothesised that anthocyanin-rich Tasmanian sweet cherry consumption will increase anthocyanin and phenolic acid metabolite biomarkers in biological samples (urine, faecal matter) in a dose-dependent manner.

This is a preliminary and fundamental step which will be useful in future studies, as a measure of compliance to the intervention, and may provide evidence of the mechanisms of action by which cherry anthocyanins are perceived to work.

Start and End Dates 2018 to 2019
Project Leader Katherine Kent
Members
  • MJ Sharman
  • ND Swarts
  • K Charlton
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description 
Partners PF and HDR, ASELCC, RCS
Funding Source St Giles Society
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2019
Project Leader Lyndsay Quarmby
Members Merylin Cross
Innovative rural service delivery models
Description

This project will explore the interrelationships between nature and human subjective wellbeing in cities and towns in Tasmania, to understand how the lived experience of biodiverse nature intersects with wellbeing and related health and social outcomes.

Partners School of Geography
and
School of Plant Sciences
Funding Source CoSE
Start and End Dates 2016 to 2019
Project Leader Pauline Marsh
Members Dave Kendal
Emily Flies

Theme Area 4: Improving the Health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

Improving the health of ATSI
Description

The research project explores how Aboriginal men from a rural Tasmanian community consider the health benefits of men’s shed participation. The findings illustrate the shed as a symbolic and symbiotic therapeutic landscape.

Partners CHAC
Start and End Dates Until 2019
Project Leader Terrance Cox
Improving the health of ATSI
Description

The state-wide program supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, medicine and social work students undertaking Professional Experience Placements (PEP).

Partners
  • Riawunna
  • PEP Office UTAS
  • Student Services UTAS
Project Leader Terrance Cox
Members
Contacts
Improving the health of ATSI
Description

The community-based education project enables members of the Circular Head Aboriginal community to study towards a Bachelor of Dementia Care and gain vocational skills in individual support (Ageing, Home and Community).

Partners DACS, CHAC, Wicking
Funding Source Department of Health (Cth): Grant-Dementia and Aged Care Services
Start and End Dates 2017 to 2020
Project Leader Terrance Cox
Members
External Members
  • Lyn Goldberg
  • Andrew Price
  • Dianne Baldock
Improving the health of ATSI
Description

The research project examined one Tasmanian Aboriginal community’s understanding of dementia and dementia care needs. The results illustrate community members had difficulties with understanding dementia, that impacted on their confidence to fulfil cultural obligations of care.

End Date 2020
Project Leader Terrance Cox
MembersHa Hoang
External Members
  • Lyn Goldberg
  • Dianne Baldock
Improving the health of ATSI
Description

The aim of the project is to examine how Elders and seniors contribute to the intergenerational wellbeing of Aboriginal people in a rural Tasmanian community. Project data will inform Aboriginal stakeholders with appropriate health and wellbeing strategies, improve Aboriginal community/CHM relationships and promote career opportunities for Aboriginal people in health, medicine and/or research.

Partners College of Health and Medicine (CHM), Centre for Rural Health (CRH), Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation
Funding Source CHM Research Enhancement Program 2019
Start and End Dates May-2019 to Dec-2019
Project Leader Terrance Cox
Members