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From here you can shape the world.

Research is an integral aspect of the College, and our research degrees equip graduates with the skills, knowledge, confidence and connections to kick start, or further, their careers.

The College of Sciences and Engineering offers a diverse range of research degrees in each of our disciplines, from hard science to creative design.

We recognise the importance of academic and non-academic careers, and work closely with industry to cross-skill our graduates with real-world experience.

Our research degrees may see you travelling to Antarctica, testing cutting-edge technology in local micro-breweries, or designing new naval ships or sustainable housing. Choose a research degree from the University of Tasmania’s College of Sciences and Engineering.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Looking for undergraduate options?
Visit the 'Find a Course' page to explore our study options

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Seaports act as gateways in today's multi-modal supply chains as over 90% of total world trade volumes are occurred to be seaborne cargo. Increasingly large vessels have been introduced to the main sea-routes to cater for the growing cargo volumes and to yield the advantages of economies of scale. Ever-increasing size of vessels and escalating costs of port operations are major challenges in the port industry around the world. The demand for intermodal handling grows proportionally to the escalating transport volumes.

The key purpose of a port terminal is to move cargo as rapidly as possible to enable the vessels to maximize the economic utilization by minimizing the time at berth.  The profitability of the ocean carries is directly associated with the amount of time vessels are at sea and for the cargo owner the efficiency is reflected as minimal dwell time, whereas for the terminal, the increased cargo throughput translates into greater profitability. The dramatic growth of cargo volumes inevitably exerts stress on the port infrastructure and the efficiency of handling. Despite large investments in the port infrastructure amounting to billions of dollars, the complexity of freight markets and the lack of collaboration between different port stakeholders often results in inefficiencies and sub-optimal use of infrastructure.

Globally, ports are facing pressure from the government and interest groups to reduce harmful emissions by improving energy efficiency. The emergence of smart technologies has been a frontier consideration for the improvement of efficiency and sustainability while reducing the cost of port operations. Therefore, the strive to become 'smart' in port operations has become exploratory for the port terminals around the world to attract the benefits and opportunities brought by upgrading from a traditional port to a smart port. This research projects aims to address the opportunities in applying smart port technologies and Internet of Things (IoT) in Australian ports.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • Shipping and port management, logistics and supply chain management, data analytics

Desirable:

  • Educational background or industrial experience in shipping and ports, supply chain and logistics management related areas

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Vera Zhang for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The recent event of Covid-19 has had an impact on world trade, especially to avoid dependence on one source of supply (e.g. China). This trend may be well coupled and supported by changes in geopolitics. Health protection measures e.g. social distancing, and safety measures coupled with new regulations are expected to have some effect on logistics and transport operations.

The liner shipping business as we know it will be different from how they worked before COVID-19 hit our shores. Navigating around and through the COVID-19 situation has left all shipping companies in uncharted waters with blank sailing becoming the norm of the day for many liner operators. Therefore, the liner shipping companies must formulate relevant marketing strategies to remain competitive in a challenging time.

This project aims to investigate the resilience of liner shipping companies in the post-COVID-19 climate. The project also seeks to identify the operational and marketing areas that liner operators need to strengthen and to design the most resilience strategy that they can use to remain competitive in the challenging seasons.

To achieve the above aim the following research questions shall be answered.

  • RQ1: What are the measures or strategies used by container lines during the pandemic period?
  • RQ2: How effective are those measures/strategies in helping companies to survive the pandemic?
Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications (e.g. master’s degree) or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Knowledge and skills in shipping operations, international trade and freight operations

Desirable Skills:

  • A previous research qualification (Honours or Masters by Research) in a management discipline, preferably shipping, commerce or business
  • Experience in quantitative and qualitative research
  • Good knowledge of international shipping
  • Highly developed written and communication skills
  • Being familiar with statistical or econometric analysis software such as SPSS, R, EViews

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Peter Fanam for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The shipping industry plays an important role in today's global economy as it is a facilitation mechanism for more than 90% of the world trade. However only in recent history thousands of incidents and accidents involving ships have resulted in loss of life and property—not to mention environmental damages of different magnitudes.

It is estimated that over 80% of all maritime mishaps are presently attributable to human element and onboard human actions. However, from early in their career, mariners have to attend formal learning environment to gain skills and knowledge that they need to practice safely onboard ships. Yet, little is known about how this learning applied practically on the job, i.e., what is transferred from one setting to another and how this transfer occurs.

Through the investigation of the mariners in their formal learning environment (marine colleges) and in their workplace (on board ships), it is the utmost purpose of the present ethnographic study to understand the implications of this discussion in reducing the shipping accidents. The database will be composed of videotapes, field notes, interviews and documents. The implications of this study are relevant to workplace learning research in general and to maritime education and safe shipping practice in particular.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full‐time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants with maritime background who are familiar with qualitative research are preferred.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Reza Emad for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The concept of 'good faith' has never been part of the contract law in common law jurisdictions, including Australia. Unlike their civil law counterparts, the House of Lords has rejected this concept since Walford v Miles [1992] 2 A.C 128. In Australia, the concept of good faith has limited role as far as contracts for international sale of goods are concerned, since Australia is a State Party to the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (Vienna, 1980) (CISG) whereby the concept of good faith is embraced in Article 7. Recently, however, the tide is starting to turn in Australia with dicta from judges showing willingness to embrace the concept of good faith. Such can be found in, for examples, Council of City of Sydney v Goldspar [2006] FCA 472 and Cordon Investments Pty Ltd v Lesdor Properties Pty Ltd [2012] NSWCA 184.

This research project has two main purposes. First, it seeks to offer critiques whether the concept of good faith should be embraced in the general contract law of Australia. This will be answered using a comparative approach. Secondly, it will seek to examine with particular emphasis on shipping contracts such as charter parties or bills of lading what roles the concept of good faith may play in such instances to better balance the rights and liabilities of parties to shipping contracts.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • Good communication and analytical skills
  • Graduated with an LLB degree or an LLMM degree from a recognised University with distinction or First Class Honours

Desirable:

  • Academic publishing experiences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Poomintr Sooksripaisarnkit for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The main focus of the project is on sustainable development of cruise/passenger terminals for cruise ships within a seaport without compromising the port's operational functions. While the three aspects of sustainable development i.e. social, economic and environmental will be covered, the project will also consider potential differences between a cruise/passenger terminal and cargo terminal within a seaport.

Given resource constraints, it will identify potential areas where resource sharing and saving can be made without compromising the operational requirements, service quality and competitiveness of the two types of terminals within a seaport. In addition, the project will consider both types of cruise terminals, i.e. dedicated terminals and multipurposed terminals, and the potential application of automation and new technologies for optimal investment and use of resources. It is expected that the project will involve participation from port management and stakeholders.

Eligibility
  • Students are expected to have a background in business economics and at least basic knowledge in statistical/econometric analysis
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Students are expected to be familiar with statistical/econometric analysis software such as SPSS, EViews, RATS, R
  • Experience in the maritime sector is desirable
  • Students without previous maritime knowledge are expected to attend JNB521 Maritime Economics for Managers as an elective for the Graduate Certificate in Research program
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Owen Nguyen through email: o.nguyen@utas.edu.au for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Maintenance of a ship's machinery components can significantly affect the ship's sustainability and profitability. Meanwhile, current maintenance state-of practice in shipping offers ample room for improvement. As such, the introduction of novel methods of monitoring the condition of machinery equipment, suggesting suitable maintenance actions, and scheduling those actions in an optimised fashion is significant.

The maintenance operations on conventional ships traditionally follow either a reactive maintenance (RM) or preventive maintenance (PM) approach. RM is defined as post-failure repair that introduces high risks of downtime, while PM involves predetermined maintenance intervals. For future fully or semi- autonomous ships, RM will  not only create large and unnecessary costs due to random and unplanned downtime, but also it may not be achievable anymore because  there will be no marine engineers on board during a voyage. Additionally, PM approach lacks the ability to detect random faults and failures. Thus, the need for a more intelligent and predictive maintenance approach is clear. In this context, data-driven prognostics and health management (PHM) have emerged as a promising solution to utilize the vast amount of data potentially collected by sensor devices onboard autonomous ships.

In recent years, deep learning algorithms have shown great performances to process large amounts of sensor data in the PHM domain. Also, there are research studies conducted to propose a data-driven PHM system for autonomous ships. The importance of data pre-processing, fault diagnostics, and fault prognostics have been highlighted in those research studies. However, fault isolation, fault classification, and decision support remain to be researched and developed to complete the data-driven PHM system for autonomous ships. Therefore, this  research project is proposed to firstly develop an approach to collect data and  propose a feasible  algorithm that can be trained to conduct fault classification, and  to predict the probability of which fault-type detected faults belongs to in the current health state. In addition, this study will develop a decision support system to recommend or direct ideal maintenance schedules.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • Bachelor of Engineering in Naval Architecture
  • Programming and data analytical skills

Desirable:

  • Work experience in ship operations and seafaring

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Naval architecture

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Shuhong Chai for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

It is often misjudged that the introduction of the word 'autonomous' is the way forward to eliminating human error. However, fully autonomous ships lack the advantage of human recoveries, where humans saved possible catastrophic situations due to technical malfunctions. Intuitively, the fully autonomous level requires complex control systems to eliminate shore supervision, which is not likely shortly. Therefore, constrained autonomy might be most likely, where ships operate with shore supervision, thus establishing a socio-technical system embedded with human error and human recoveries.

In constrained autonomous systems, the operator changes limits or remotely control it until constrained operations resume if the ship needs to override the set parameters. The Human Factors (HF) research community has stated this as a rational and pragmatic approach with humans and technology teaming-up providing safer and effective outcomes. This approach is relatively new and called Human-Autonomy Teaming (HAT), which is increasingly utilised to realise the capabilities of powerful automation systems while gaining acceptance. HAT is defined as the interdependent coupling between one or more human operators and one or more autonomous systems requiring collaboration and coordination to accomplish system and task goals. In this context, Deep Learning (DL) can be integrated for developing autonomous systems, which are identified as agents. These DL agents can perform complex tasks and make decisions based on numerous training trials rather than the use of explicitly constructed or pre-programmed data.

This research project aims to develop a DL algorithm of a human-centred engine-room control agent operating in a HAT environment. Integrating real-operational scenarios into the engine-room control agent requires a profound knowledge of user-context, which manifolds due to various concurrent goals and established human teaming procedures. Therefore, various scenario-based engine-room operational activities will be performed in the engine room simulator of the Australian Maritime College (AMC) for obtaining real-world user context data. The data will be collected in the forms of surveys, observations, focus group interviews and scenario-based simulator data generation. The research will then utilise the elements such as task analysis, hierarchical task analysis, and event sequence diagrams to analyse the data. The findings will be used to train, test, and validate the DL algorithm within the human-centred engine-room control agent. The outcome of this study will contribute to human-centred maritime autonomy and the training and education needs of the shore-based operators.

Eligibility
  • Essential skills: deep learning algorithms, data mining and data analytics
  • Experience: Matlab and Simulink
  • Requirements: technical report and scientific writing skills
  • Desirable: experience in human factors and human-centred design, experience on board ships, computer programming and experience in engine room simulator software will be an added advantage

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Apsara Abeysiriwardhane for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Global demand for efficient sea transportation has led to the evolution of large vessels worldwide. To capitalise on this efficiency increase, these larger vessels must manoeuvre in ever more confined waterways. Operating in such confined waterways creates unsafe transit for channel shipping. Additionally, extreme drought condition has led to low water levels in rivers and consequently has interrupted transportation not only by larger vessels but also by current vessels which could safely passed through the rivers in the past. To provide safe transits, all possible vertical motions and draught changes should be considered. One of the sources of the draught change is the dynamic heel due to rudder deflection. Operating in rivers requires remaining in the provided safe course and vessels' rudders are continuously in motion for course keeping purposes.

When a body moves in a circular path, there is a force towards the centre called centripetal force. In the case of a ship turning in a circle, the centripetal force is produced by the water acting on the side of the ship away from the centre of the turn. For equilibrium, there must be an equal and opposite force, which acts at the centre of mass (G). When a ship's rudder turns to port, the forces on the rudder itself causes a small angle of heel initially to port, however, the underwater form of the ship and centrifugal force on it cause a final static heel to starboard, and vice versa.

These two forces are coupled which tends to heel the ship away from the centre of the turn. Although a dynamic heel is developed during this coupling, the final static heel is usually taken into consideration. Neglecting dynamic heel is acceptable in waves due to the small ratio of this motion to the roll motion. However, in the case of calm water, particularly in rivers, canals and ports where there is restriction in terms of width and depth, the dynamic heel plays an important role.

This research project aims to investigate the effect of rudder deflection on the vessel's dynamic heel by three different methods of experimental, numerical and analytically solving equations of motion.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • To have already been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Be the first author of at least two published (or accepted) high ranked journal papers

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Naval architecture
  • Maritime engineering
  • Mechanical engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Javad Mehr for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Until now electricity generation in Constructed Wetlands (CWs) integrated with Microbial Fuel Cell for coastal areas is very low. The improvement in electricity generation or electron flow to the conductive material can be applied for real time applications such as pollutant sensing. In addition, transfer of electron to conductive material can also enhance the treatment of wastewater in CW.  It is reported by several studies with bioelectrochemical cells such as MFC, a large fraction of electron transfers to the methanogenic bacteria for the production of methane gas. This is the reason why the production rate of methane gas is high in CW-MFC systems whereas electricity generation is low. In this project, we are trying to inhibit methanogenic bacteria so that the entire or maximum electron goes directly to the conductive material. With extracting more electrons from the microbes, electricity generation of CW-MFC can be enhanced. This strategy can also be beneficial for producing greenhouse gases of low potential.

So, the objectives of this PhD research are:

  1. Enhance the electricity generation in MFCs by inhibiting the methanogenic activities
  2. Investigating the potential of MFC for real time applications such as pollution sensing
Eligibility

Essential Skills

  • The potential candidate for this PhD project should have previous working experience in measurement and analysis of different contaminants in environmental laboratory

Desirable Skills

  • Having previous experience in application of different machine learning techniques is an extra advantage in selecting the PhD candidate

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Vikram Garaniya for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Global demand for fast and efficient sea transportation has led to the evolution of large high-speed and lightweight vessels for both commercial and military use. Different types of high-speed craft have been designed to satisfy this requirement, but some factors such as large deck area, relatively large deadweight to displacement ratios, the ability to provide lightweight Ro-Ro vessels (Roll-on/Roll-off vessels capable of carrying wheeled cargo such as cars and trucks) and high hydrostatic and hydrodynamic stability have proven catamarans to be particularly popular.

High-speed catamarans, due to their slender twin hull geometry and high operating Froude number, frequently experience larger heave and pitch motions and accelerations than those of conventional monohulls operating at lower Froude number. The vessel motions are directly influenced by increases in the operating speed, leading to passenger discomfort and potential structural damage when operating in higher sea states and severe sea conditions. A motion control system is therefore required to reduce these large motions, increase passenger comfort and improve the vessel performance.

There have been some prior studies of Ride Control Systems (RCS) relevant to this type of fast ships. The current project aims to continue the study of RCS and the influence of ride control algorithms on the motion and load response of high-speed catamarans by numerical and experimental investigations using an existing 2.5m hydroelastic segmented catamaran model based on an Incat 112m wave-piercer catamaran.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills;
  • Applicants must be the first author of at least two published (or accepted) high-ranked journal papers.

Applicants must be from at least one of the following disciplinary backgrounds:

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Naval architecture
  • Maritime engineering

Applicants with the following skills will rank highly:

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
  • Hands-on in experimental work specially towing tank testing
  • Computer programming skills
For More Information

Please contact Dr Javad AlaviMehr for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Global concerns about air pollution and human's health are continuously forcing manufacturers to improve the performance of engines and reduce emissions. This has been more focused on the diesel engines since the conventional CI engine sustains with high nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions.

One solution to this is replacing conventional fossil fuels by alternative fuels. Among the alternative fuels, ethanol and methanol have been considered as suitable diesel fuel replacement. Methanol is a clean-burning fuel that produces fewer smog-causing emissions such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and particulate matter, and can improve air quality and related human health issues. Methanol can be produced from not only natural gas but also renewable sources such as biomass and recycled carbon dioxide.

This project aims to investigate the effect of methanol fumigation on the performance, operation and combustion emission of diesel engines.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidate
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must have already been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must be the first author of at least two published (or accepted) high-ranked journal papers

Desirable skills/experience

  • Good knowledge of diesel engines, fuel injection system and fumigation
  • Hands-on in experimental work specially engines
  • Computer programming skills
  • Good knowledge of LabVIEW programming
  • Experience in Data Acquisition & Signal Processing
  • Good understanding of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics specifically in the framework of high-pressure and compressible flows

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Javad Mehr for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Joint Research Centre:
The Australia-China Joint Research Centre of Offshore Wind and Wave Energy is a trans-national research body jointly funded by the Australian Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, and the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, via the ACSRF-JRC scheme. The Joint Research Centre involves over 10 partners across the two nations with expertise in both offshore wind and wave energy industries, led by the University of Adelaide and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The aim of the Joint Research Centre is to reduce costs of ocean renewable energy and make it a competitive sustainable energy source for the future.

The Project:
This project offers an exceptional opportunity to work within a large international and multidisciplinary team, studying hybrid wind and wave energy conversion systems. Based in the National Centre for Maritime Engineering and Hydrodynamics (NCMEH) at the University of Tasmania, you will undertake research activities in the design and conduct of experiments to be performed on a hybrid wind-and-wave energy converter array. You will work closely with academics and postgraduate students from NCMEH. You will also engage with researchers and engineers at other nodes of the Australia-China Joint Research Centre, both interstate and overseas.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • 2nd class Honours (or higher) in Ocean Engineering or related fields with significant research component
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills

Desirable Skills:

  • In-depth knowledge of hydrodynamics
  • Experience in experimental research and analysis

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jean-Roch Nader for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Rapid technological development has accelerated industry development to Industry 4.0 concept, where machines are connected more than ever in a collaborative community. Parallel to this, 'Smart Logistics' and 'Logistic 4.0' are emerging in the field of transport and logistics. With these advancements, the logistics in port and maritime supply chains have reached a degree of complexity that the management of port operations need of intelligent analytical methods to support the decision-making process. However, the use of analytical methods during daily operations is found to be problematic to implement without the aid of technological platforms that simplify the required computations. The most common technological platform currently used is the Decision Support System (DSS).

Human Factors (HF) engineering can make a positive contribution to improving the usability of DSS. For DSS, usability is critical and if the system is mismatched with intended user requirements, it leads to poor and fatal decision making as human error is increasing. Therefore, to guarantee a high level of productivity, efficiency, and to make sure DSS reflects usability as good as possible, it is necessary to consider physical, cognitive, and psychosocial HF during the design of DSS, which can be accomplished through Human-Centred Design (HCD) approach.

In the port logistic management context, the HF studies are predominantly focused on physical HF, such as reducing human energy expenditure or fatigue in logistics and supply chain. Very little attention has been paid to the interactions between engineering choices and cognitive and psychosocial factors that influence system performance. Thus, the application of HCD in the design of DSS in port logistics management systems has been overlooked in the past. Besides, it is identified that
re+latively little or no support has been provided for engineers designing DSS systems in terms of HF and how to provide the information in a way that actively supports human decision making.

This research project is aiming to address this gap and develop a framework for integrating HF into the design of DSS for port logistics management systems. Firstly, a systematic literature mapping on the design and development of DSS for port logistics management will be performed to identify the challenges in applying the HCD approach in DSS design. Then, a deeper understanding will be gained of DSS users and user-technology interactions within the port logistics system from psychological and sociological perspectives. This research study will use the Activity Theory as the theoretical foundation considering the port logistics system as a socio-technical system. Perspectives of Activity Theory, distributed cognition, and situated learning have profound reference value in human-technology interaction research, providing insightful understanding about the nature of knowledge and interaction design, particularly how tool mediation could facilitate social interaction.

With such a broad scope, a qualitative, exploratory research approach will be considered appropriate to capture rich, detailed information on the nature of DSS users and their interactions with technology within the port logistics system. The findings will then be used to develop a framework that can be used by DSS system design engineers during the early design phase to integrate the HF requirements to improve usability. The outcome of this research will promisingly contribute to a long-term human-centric vision regarding design and technological innovation in the process of information and the digital revolution, which would expectedly contribute to the safety, efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability of the port logistics management systems in the long run.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications (e.g. master's degree) or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must have knowledge and skills in the following areas: Port logistics management, decision support systems, and user-technology interactions from psychological and sociological perspectives
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for doctoral study

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience in Human Factors and Human Centred Design
  • Work experience in port logistics management, maritime supply chain management, international organisations, the government or logistics sector is desirable

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Apsara Abeysiriwardhane for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In recent years, the advent of technology especially in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) brings about the possibility of developing fully autonomous systems. Recently, with the introduction of commercially sensible solutions, design and operation of unmanned and autonomous cargo and passenger ships are gaining momentum. Soon this would persuade shipping companies to add autonomous ships into their fleet. Therefore, this research is timely as autonomous shipping is not a promise to be delivered in the future, but a reality which has already started.

This research will conduct an extensive investigation to identify the education and training requirements for seafarers who will operate the autonomous ships in the near future. The findings of this research will provide guidelines and a recommendatory framework which can be used by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) and the maritime regulators to revise training needs towards mentoring seafarers and equipping them with the expertise required.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full‐time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from any disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants with maritime background who are familiar with qualitative research are preferred

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Reza Emad for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Since the first cargoes were moved by sea more than 5,000 years ago, maritime transport has been at the forefront of the global economy, easily accounting for most international cargo transport in the modern world. Being the largest continental landmass surrounded by water, Australia must rely on maritime transport to promote international trade and support economic growth. In 2018–19 Australia's top three goods exports were iron ores and concentrates ($77,189 million), coal ($69,592 million), and natural gas ($49,731 million), which are carried by sea. Managing this enormous movement of cargo in an efficient, safe, and environmentally friendly way therefore plays an essential role in planning for sustainable development in Australia.

This research aims to examine how maritime transport can promote Australia's economy in an efficient, safe, and sustainable manner, providing a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental issues of profitability, safety, and sustainability in the maritime industry.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • Econometrics, maritime transport, port development, international trade

Desirable:

  • Quantitative modelling, MATLAB and STATA, shipping knowledge/consultancy experience

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Wenming Shi for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

One of the key factors which helps shipping companies thrive in a competitive market is minimising fuel consumption through advanced route planning. This also aligns with the world's target in reducing air emissions in a framework of mitigating the effects of climate change. From the shipping industry point of view, this may be achieved with an optimum route plan design.

Existing research has focused on the ship's routing optimisation by taking meteo-oceanographic forecasts into account. Some of these contributions have been tested through a 'proof-of-concept' based on long voyages. However, at a relatively short distance the route shipping optimisation remains unexplored. In this case, utilising spatial resolution of the meteo-oceanographic predictions would be an invaluable contribution.

From a different perspective, coastal vessels are particularly vulnerable in terms of stability accidents and have historically experienced numerous stability related cases, mainly due to the lack of regulatory framework, but often related to inappropriate responses by inexperienced crew, especially when encountering some challenging weather condition at sea. The Second Generation of Intact Stability Criteria (SGISC) in the near future will require implementation of operational limitations and operational guidance in specific areas, routes or seasons to prevent five dynamic stability failure modes: 1) pure loss of stability; 2) parametric roll; 3) surf riding/broaching; 4) dead ship condition; and 5) excessive acceleration. Limitations imposed on the operation include loading capacity, intended sailing routes and desired speed.

Without compromising the design standard, the ship's operation must fulfil the regulations in terms of operation consistent with the initial design. These might limit operation in specific navigational areas and routes considering seasonal weather conditions, which needs to be considered in optimised ship's routing to maintain a sufficient safety level.

The objectives of this project are to:

  1. Improve ship's efficiency in terms of fuel consumption using an optimised route while utilising high resolution meteo-oceanographic data;
  2. Maximise the operational capacity by minimising the adverse effect of operational limitations imposed by SGISC;
  3. Implement this understanding into a state-of-the-art numerical simulation to cover the Australian jurisdiction waters.
Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • In-depth understanding of ship's stability
  • Experience in working with engineering software such as MatLab

Desirable Skills:

  • Basic understanding of signal processing techniques
  • Exposure to ship simulator
  • Experience in optimisation techniques

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Hossein Enshaei for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

A combined consideration of design and operation aspects can effectively be used to achieve a sufficient safety level. In application, this principle requires further investigation to be provided for the preparation of operational measures, consistent with the vulnerability assessment and for the specification of direct stability assessment.

The Second Generation of Intact Stability Criteria (SGISC) in near future requires implementation of the operational limitations and operational guidance in specific areas, routes or season to prevent five stability failure modes: 1. pure loss of stability; 2. parametric roll; 3. surf riding/broaching; 4. dead ship condition; and 5. excessive acceleration. Limitations imposed on the operation, limit the loading capacity, the intended sailing routes and the desired speed. However, that is not received favourably by ship owners and operators.

The objectives of this project are:

1. Developing an algorithm to identify aforesaid stability failure modes, using real-time sea state prediction,

2. Maximising the operational capacity by minimising the adverse effect of operational limitations imposed by SGISC.

3. Implement this understanding into a state-of-the-art numerical simulation

Eligibility
  • Indepth understanding of ship's hydrodynamics
  • Experience with CFD codes/software
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Basic understanding of signal processing techniques
  • Exposure to ship model testing
  • Ship sailing experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Hossein Enshaei for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Among sea surface parameters recorded by merchant ships, the wave characteristics are estimated with least accuracy through visual observation. The inaccuracy in estimation of wave length is in the range of tens of meters and up to a few meters for the wave heights. Therefore, ocean wave forecasting is currently achieved by the surface winds from a weather forecast model to determine the growth of the ocean waves. The waves along the coasts can be measured by utilising the heave, pitch and roll motions of a buoy to simulate the passing incident waves, but only if the moored buoy’s dynamics are ignored. A similar analogy can be applied to the measurement of ocean waves using a ship's motion, as the ship can be considered an unmoored buoy encountering incident waves. Since the ship’s hull is not a known geometric object, then dynamics of motion are strongly influenced by each different hull shape.

A novel theory of a ship’s dynamic shows that the spectrum of heave and pitch motion response has a strong correlation to the ocean wave spectrum. Motion spectrum is sustained by wave energy induced to the ship’s hull, while the ship’s relative speed and direction is considered. Overall, changes of wave configuration are slow, hence the ship’s motion response is affected gradually, which provides sufficient time for the required analysis. Measurement of wave spectrum is not possible while a ship is underway thus the transfer and distribution of energy in the ocean is uncertain.

A ship’s motion is of a complex, 6 degrees of freedom time-varying nature, and can be measured by a means of suitably-positioned sensors to record the motion as a continuous time signal.

Ships’ motions are good reflections of the local sea conditions and probably one of the most practical means for measuring the wave spectrum in a real-time by way of reverse engineering. Because of the strong coupling nature, these motions are in tune with irregular wave patterns and therefore actively monitoring their responses could be utilised to estimate the influence of wave parameters.

The aims of this project are to:

  1. Improve wave measurement processes using a direct, innovative approach; and
  2. Implement this understanding into a state-of-the-art numerical simulation.

Aim 1 will be carried out by conducting hydrodynamic model experiments and developing process-oriented numerical simulations. The results will be validated by full-scale ship trials.

Aim 2 will explore wave characteristics and a novel ship-wave interaction feedback.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • In dept understanding of ship’s hydrodynamics
  • Experience with CFD codes/software

Applicants with the following skills will rank highly:

  • Basic understanding of signal processing techniques
  • Exposure to ship model testing
For More Information

Please contact Dr Hossein Enshaei for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

With an increase of demand for clean fossil fuel, the production and processing of natural gas have been pushed to ultra-deepwater locations using complex facilities such Floating Liquefied Natural Gas (FLNG) processing facility. Having very little operational experiences of FLNG, the production of LNG using land-based technologies in rough seas presents a high risk of LNG leakage and subsequent events such as fire and vapour cloud explosion (VCE). An integrated impact of LNG spill including dispersion, fire and VCE on structure and personnel is a key aspect for safer FLNG operations. This project integrates the following key safety aspects of an FLNG processing facility;

  • Identification of credible spill scenarios in FLNG processing facilities,
  • An effective design for early detection system for LNG leakage and its vapour,
  • Modelling impacts of multiple pool fires in FLNG processing facilities,
  • Assessing the likelihood of Deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) occurrence in FLNG processing facilities, and
  • Development of novel methodologies to reduce the likelihood and/or impact of LNG spill and subsequent events

Therefore, the project aims to develop novel frameworks for modelling impacts of LNG spill by incorporating a series of subsequent events and developing methodologies for reducing the likelihood and/or impact of those events. The outcome of this project will provide key insights into the risk assessment and safety management in FLNG processing facilities.

Eligibility
  • Open to domestic (Australia and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full time basis
  • Already awarded First Class Honours Degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills and be first author of at least two published (or accepted) high-ranked journal papers
  • Experience with CFD codes/software

Desirable Skills:

  • Priority will be given to those who got the first-class honours for his/her bachelor’s degree and master by coursework course with research components and/or publications
  • In-depth knowledge of oil and gas production and processing particularly floating processing facilities

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Til Baalisampang for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

A complex web of business settings known as 'networks' is a modern business phenomenon. A simplest explanation of this is perhaps what Collins described:

"…a grouping of contractual arrangements between more than two parties with a productive aim that requires the interaction and co-operation of all the parties. Within networks, many of the parties have contractual links … but there are also many other economic relations present that have not been constructed through an express contract".

(Collins, H 2003, 'Introduction: the research agenda of implicit dimensions of contracts' in Campbell, D, Collins, H & Wightman, J (eds), Implicit dimensions of contract: discrete, relational and network contracts, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp 19-20).

Supply chains contracts and distribution agreements represent examples of such networks. This new business phenomenon has been discussed extensively among scholars in Continental Europe but it has not gained much attention among scholars in common law jurisdictions. Networks raised thorny issues in private international law both in respect of relationship among members of networks and the relationship between networks and outsiders. This research project aims at studying this phenomenon with particular emphasis on supply chain contracts and distribution agreements. It aims at creating an appropriate choice of law rules to govern activities of networks.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • Good communication and analytical skills
  • Graduated with an LLB degree or an LLMM degree from a recognised University with distinction or First Class Honours

Desirable:

  • Academic publishing experiences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Poomintr Sooksripaisarnkit for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Global concerns to reduce emissions are continuously forcing manufacturers to improve the efficiency of engines by optimising fuel injection systems and combustion process. Despite the wide use of injectors, the key physics of the fuel injection processes are not yet fully understood imposing a significant challenge for the development of more efficient injection system and combustion process. The primary atomisation of the liquid fuel jet occurs in the region close to the nozzle exit, influences secondary atomisation, spray dynamics, air-fuel mixture quality, and ultimately the entire combustion process. Complex and concurrent physics associated with primary and secondary atomisation of liquid fuel induce more constraints for researchers to experimentally characterise the effect of phenomena such as swirl flow, flow separation, cavitation, and turbulence on spray dynamics.

These limitations can be tackled by the means of numerical modellings which provide a clearer understanding of spray dynamics involving transition from liquid jets to fine droplets. Numerical models which are used in the design of fuel injectors are subjected to further developments through the inclusion of recent research findings. Experimental tests conducted within the AMC's constant volume high-pressure spray chamber provide a qualitative and quantitative database to evaluate and validate numerical modelling results. The present work focuses on processes in the nozzle and the first several nozzle diameters after the nozzle exit of a single-hole solid cone injector.

High fidelity numerical model can be utilised to characterise detailed evolution of fuel spray from liquid jets to dispersed small scale droplets. The use of high-resolution numerical scheme and flux reconstruction algorithm can deal with highly turbulent flow phenomenon that occur with a great variation in spatial and time scales. Highly accurate results predicted by the developed high-resolution numerical methods can act as an indispensable supplement to existing experimental observations and measurements, which contribute to the optimisation/development of next generation low emission and high thermal efficiency combustion engines.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must have already been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must be the first author of at least two published (or accepted) high-ranked journal papers

Essential Skills/Experience/Requirements

  • Good understanding of fluid mechanics specifically in the framework of high-pressure and compressible flows
  • Good understanding of CFD theories including pressure-velocity coupling, heat and mass transfer, multiscale-modelling in the framework of compressible flow
  • Experience in OpenFOAM (experience in structured mesh generation and high order numberical scheme are preferred)

Desirable Skills/Experience

  • Experience in high pressure fuel injection system
  • Experience in developing explicit/implicit method for all March number flows
  • Experience in data processing using Python
  • Experience in C++
  • Ability to conduct spray chamber testing and work to assemble, disassemble and commission new injection systems

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Javad Mehr for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Ocean acidification is a process whereby carbon dioxide (CO2), mainly from the atmosphere, dissolves in seawater and form carbonic acid. This weak acid triggers changes in the seawater chemistry that lead to the decrease of ocean's pH. It is estimated that oceans absorb about 30% per cent of CO2 produced by humans. As such, CO2 emissions reduction is probably the only sustainable way to minimise this acidification process. However, the present trend of CO2 release to atmosphere does not support this effort. According to the Third IMO Green House Gas Study 2014, the mid‐range forecasted scenarios project a potential increase of CO2 emissions from international shipping between 50% to 250% by year 2050. The magnitude of this increment depends on the aggressiveness of world economic growth as well as energy developments.

In line with the effort of Goal 14 (Life Below Water) of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, target 14.3 to "Minimize and address the impacts of ocean acidification, including through enhanced scientific cooperation at all levels", the goal of this research is to establish potential port policy that can effectively contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from maritime activities within port limits through efficient port operations.

Eligibility
  • Maritime transport, port development, environmental management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Quantitative and qualitative analysis, shipping industry experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Vera Zhang for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The project involves development of novel prediction and control algorithms for parametric roll motion. The mechanism to cause parametric roll, especially the resonance phenomenon, is investigated and the parametric roll motion in head and follow sea waves is predicted by CFD modelling approach and validated by experimental data using the model scaled contained vessel of which the height of metacentre can be adjusted. Once the parametric roll motion can be predicted, a roll reduction control algorithm will be proposed and tested.

Eligibility
  • Skills and experiences required include surface vessel dynamics/hydrodynamics, motion in waves, CFD techniques for investigation of hydrodynamics, C/C++ at code developer level, MATLAB simulation for control algorithm design, hardware and software development for control algorithms
  • Technical report and scientific writing skill for publication is a must
  • Applicants from any disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Priority will be given to those who got the first-class honours for his/her bachelor degree and master by coursework course with research components and/or publications
  • Experience in electric/electronic wiring
  • Some experience in conducting experiments using towing tank, model test basin or model scaled board
  • Experience in collaborative research/publication with the existing AMC staff is also a plus
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Hung Nguyen for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Nowadays, companies do not compete against each other but their supply chains. The service quality management is regarded as important tool in supply chains in gaining the competitive advantages in terms of achieving the maximum customer value while maintaining the lowest cost. Maritime transport is an essential section in the global supply chain system and is necessary to incorporate to the service quality management in the global supply chains. A maritime supply chain contains series of shipping activities concerning transporting cargoes from point of origin to the point of the destination. As such, service quality is a key factor in the utility function in the competitive maritime supply chain management. The service quality also has the impact on the pricing strategy for the maritime supply chain management. The research aims to provide reference for policy makers and industrial practitioners in maritime supply chains in terms of service quality management and gaining the competitive advantages.

Eligibility
  • Operations Research, supply chain management, data analytics, maritime business
  • Industrial experience in supply chain management and shipping-related areas

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Vera Zhang for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Campus

Launceston Campus

Scholarship

There is a living allowance scholarship of $28,092pa (2020 rate) for this Masters of Research project for 2 years with no extension, that will be considered for an outstanding applicant.

The Research Project

This project focuses on the crucial contribution of supply chains and logistic activities for the offshore co-location of aquaculture and renewable energy.  Already, businesses are recognising the potential benefits of adopting a blue economy advantage by shifting seafood farming and production to offshore locations as evidenced by for example salmon farming and kelp harvesting. In addition, there is growing interest in offshore locations for the production of wind, tidal energy, and other sources of renewable energy.  Within this emerging context, there are the many challenges that will impact on traditional business practices in an offshore environment, including how these quite different industries can be co-located on shared multi-use platforms many kilometres from shore.

Moving these businesses offshore will also necessitate different approaches to addressing logistics challenges in remote environments in locations that may be at times unsafe and constantly changing.  Additionally, the supply chains in which the offshore aquaculture and renewable energy businesses operate, that may extend internationally, will be required to co-exist as supply chain networks if they are to gain the required efficiencies to remain viable.

This project will initially require an assessment of the range of aquaculture and renewable energy activities that can be undertaken offshore and in doing so, identify the various industry actors and stakeholders making up this new blue economy ecosystem. Another aspect of this research is evaluating potential alternative business models suitable for integrating offshore business practices within a unified supply chain network.  The validity of the findings from the literature review will then be tested by empirical research by collecting and analysing the views from the industry actors and stakeholders to identify opportunities, challenges and concerns to developing a viable and sustainable ecosystem in the blue economy. The outcomes of this project are expected to identify workable design options for sustainable blue economy operations and the associated management of the supply chain network.

This project is directly aligned with Blue Economy Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) research milestones and will be based on the Newnham campus of the University of Tasmania in the city of Launceston.  The project is only available for new international students and is offered in a full-time on campus mode.

Eligibility
  • Proficient understanding of supply chain management principles ad approaches
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for Masters level study
  • Good analytical skills
  • Ability to interact closely with industry professionals
  • An understanding of the blue economy including the aquaculture and renewable energy industries is desirable
  • This opportunity is available to International applicants only (due to the Commonwealth funding supporting this scholarship)
  • Applicants must be commencing studies at the University of Tasmania for the first time to be eligible for this scholarships (graduates and those who have commenced a course of study are ineligible)
  • Applicants must maintain full-time enrolment on the Launceston Campus

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stephen Cahoon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Tasmanian Government has developed a food security strategy to ensure affordable, healthy food for Tasmanians . The Tasmania population (0.515 million people) is less than 10% of the Singaporean population (5.61 million people). Yet, its land area (68,401 km2) is about 95 times that of Singapore (721.5 km2). While the availability of land and natural resources is a great advantage for Tasmania, low population density goes against it especially in terms of the supply and distribution costs, as well as social and economic connectivity. This affects the efficacy of the State's food security strategy.

Study objective and research questions:

The project's main objective is to study the role, operations and performance of the Tasmanian food supply network to ensure food security for Tasmanians. The study aims to answer the following research questions (RQ):

  • RQ1: How can food supply network in Tasmania be mapped?
  • RQ2: What are the roles of the stakeholders in the food security in Tasmania?
  • RQ3: How well is the food supply network connected in Tasmania?
  • RQ4: How can the food supply network in Tasmania be evaluated?

Research method:

The project aims to conduct network analysis of the food supply network in Tasmania to improve the efficiency and resilience of food security for the population, especially vulnerable people and families of with social and economic conditions in Tasmania. The study will involve the following:

  • Food supply network mapping for Tasmania
  • Calculation of network measures including density, degree distribution, degree centrality, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, eigenvector centrality, cluster coefficient, assortativity
  • Network analysis using the exponential/random network models to evaluate the effect of various factor on network formation and connectivity
  • Stakeholder survey to study the issues and obstacles facing the food supply chain network and food security in Tasmania

How is this study expected to support food security for vulnerable Tasmanians?

RQ1 seeks to develop and gain an understanding of the structure of the food supply network in Tasmania. Based on this, RQ2 and RQ3 seek further insights into the role of and relationship between stakeholders in the food supply network respectively. RQ4 aims to gain a better understanding of the issues and improve the efficiency of the food supply network in Tasmania.

Eligibility
  • Students are expected to be familiar with statistical/econometric analysis software such as SPSS, EViews, RATS, and R
  • Work experience in business management, international organisations, the government or logistics sector is desirable
  • Applicants must have research experience through in their previous study programs and background in logistics and supply chain management, and, or economics with at least basic knowledge in statistical/econometric analysis.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Oanh Nguyen for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

There is a growing need for implementation of artificial intelligence (AI) in procurement functions as it allows procurement departments to solve complex problems by using smart computer algorithms, generating effective innovation strategies. Digital technologies such as machine learning, deep learning, and neural networks can all be considered as AI which provides a wide range of opportunities for firms to bring innovations faster to the market. The ability of the firms to drive innovations as new value-adding products and services can significantly affect their competitive advantages which cannot be successfully achieved without collaborations with their suppliers.

Supply networks are potentially rich sources of ideas and innovation, and suppliers have been considered as the most important partners in the firms' innovation efforts. This emphasises the importance of procurement in assisting firms to access suppliers' innovation capabilities. Best practices have indicated that AI applications in procurement functions can increasingly facilitate the innovation development process in different ways. For example, through automation and improvement of firms' search capabilities, AI applications provide procurement professionals with additional insights into identifying the highly innovative suppliers and analysing their role in developing more innovative products and services. However, research contributions in exploring the impact of AI applications on supporting procurement decisions for collaborative innovations are extremely limited.

Therefore, there are huge potentials for focusing on procurement functions to stimulate supplier innovations in the era of digital transformation. In this regard, this project investigates the applications of AI in enabling procurement functions to leverage supplier capabilities for the innovation development process.

Eligibility
  • Deep understanding of supply chain management and procurement functions
  • Understanding of AI and related technologies
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for doctoral study
  • Good analytical skills
  • Work or research experience in supply chain management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Hadi Rezaei Vandchali for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

To achieve profitable and sustainable growths, supply chains need to adjust rapidly to market conditions (e.g. customer preferences, competitive forces) by predicting and responding to demand especially when it is unplanned. The recent COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the need for being agile in the marketplace as the pandemic has dramatically accelerated the changes in consumers' demand. Procurement agility will play an influential role in helping firms' supply chain management to adapt to the new challenges of an increasingly dynamic and complex environment. By opening the door to new opportunities, procurement agility can help supply chains to react to sudden changes in demand, which can be considered as a characteristic of successful procurement organisations because firms with high performing procurement functions outperform their competitors. Agile procurement can cope with uncertainties in a volatile environment by monitoring the key metrics that measure suppliers' health. For example, it can help firms to identify an alternative supplier that can be joined quickly to the firms' supply network when the risk of supplying from the original supplier increases. This can be a call for a supply chain that can effectively adjust to a changing marketplace by seamlessly sourcing from multiple locations.

In recent years, world-class procurement professionals have adequately embraced and driven the digital transformation to respond with changing requirements of their customers, both internally and externally. The adoption of industry 4.0 technologies has transformed the way that procurement operates by enabling procurement functions to identify and explore previously untapped sources of value. For example, accessing supplier data has been a challenging task for firms. Industry 4.0 technologies such as the internet of things (IoT) and cloud-based infrastructure are helping firms to be flexibly responsive by collecting, processing and analysing real-time data from various suppliers within the supply network. In addition, as the need for offering new services and products increases, agile procurement teams with deep knowledge of emerging technologies can help firms to reduce their development time by fostering collaborative relationships with innovative suppliers. This means that digitalisation can be an effective tool of agility.

Since the real challenge in digitalising processes is to integrate technology and insights in a way that is both progressive and supports business needs, this project will investigate how digital transformation of the procurement functions can improve firms' supply chain agility.

Eligibility
  • Good understanding of supply chain management and procurement functions
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills
  • Good analytical skills
  • Work or research experience in supply chain management

Desirable Skills

  • Good knowledge of Industry 4.0 technologies and big data analytics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Hadi Rezaei Vandchali for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

An opportunity exists for a PhD candidate interested in the impact of new and emerging technologies on the resilience of shipping organisations.  With increased disruption expected within maritime supply chains, this PhD thesis will explore the range of potential technologies and their impact on increasing the vulnerability of shipping organisations and the ability to recover and adapt in an unknown environment.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Demonstrate evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for doctoral study
  • Knowledge and skills in maritime transport operations and maritime business

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stephen Cahoon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The increasing integration of maritime transport with global supply chains is leading to new forms of risks and ongoing challenges for maritime transport operators such as port authorities, terminal operators and shipping companies. Greater inter-connectedness with supply chain partners is increasing the vulnerability of maritime transport operators to risks of disruption from unexpected sources.

This study will investigate the impact of supply chain risks on the resilience of maritime transport operators. Specifically, the study will investigate how the extent of interconnectedness influences vulnerability, recoverability and adaptability of maritime transport operators to external shocks and stresses. Findings from the study will assist maritime transport operators in devising strategies and tools to withstand, recover, and adapt to, disruptive change.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for doctoral study
  • Knowledge and skills in the following areas:  maritime transport operations, maritime business, supply chain management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stephen Cahoon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The purpose of this research is to gain insight into the unsteady loading imparted to lifting surfaces immersed in structured turbulent flows. The study will explore experimentally the dependency on the physical characteristics of the oncoming flow and the hydrofoil geometry. New instrumentation will be developed with an extended range of frequency resolution to provide greater insight into the correlation between the underlying flow physics and the resulting unsteady force spectra.

The main benefit of the outcomes of this project will be to contribute to improved propulsion and control surface design for naval platforms. Reduced vibration and radiated noise will result in improved structural design and signature performance.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Honors degree or equivalent in mathematics, science or engineering
  • The successful candidate must be prepared to submit a valid application for Australian Security Clearance (for further information see www.defence.gov.au/security/clearances)

Desirable Skills:

  • Expertise in experimental fluid mechanics and advanced data analysis skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Paul Brandner for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Technologies are already developed with capability for supporting multiple HD video cameras, high power LED lights and associated electronics at depths of up to 6000m. The term "Towed Camera Platform" just refers to the mechanical frame with any possible control surfaces on which the electronics/camera/lights are mounted.  Though some guidelines do exist, a comprehensive physical model is not yet developed that can inform hydrodynamic systems design, accurately model behaviour and inform mission planning.

Working directly with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD), the project will address the following topics:

1. How does the cable and package behave?
2. Is it possible to model and predict cable vibration/dynamics/strumming?
3. Streamlined and stable towed platforms, with control surfaces - what would be the ideal shapes/geometries?
4. Is it possible to design a simple towed platform with control surfaces that have basic pitch/roll/yaw control?

Given that the AAD would ultimately be deploying and testing a towed platform behind the RSV Nuyina, the results of any analysis/studies at AMC could be tested and validated in practice.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • In-depth understanding of towed body dynamics
  • Experience with CFD software
  • Good analytical skills

Desirable:

  • Interest in Antarctic Research and in particular the deployment of the RSV Nuyina
  • Good scientific writing skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Assoc. Prof. Michael Woodward for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Industry 4.0 is a broad term used to refer to the fourth Industrial Revolution. It integrates the relationships between workers, systems, objects, and sections of an organization, supported by various applications such as the internet of things (IoT), cyber-physical systems (CPSs), artificial intelligence (AI), and big data analytics (BDA). In recent years, digitisation, automation and advanced analytics are causing transformation in global competitions by enabling firms to manage their supply chain network (SCN). A global SCN consists of multiple interconnected buyers and suppliers of products or services who are located in different geographical areas. Using various applications of industry 4.0 can affect the way that buyers and suppliers interact by facilitating and integrating the processes and systems leading to better cooperation and communication with each other in a new intelligent way.

The substantial disruptions of the material flow in the global SCNs can result in significant losses that may threaten firm's SCN. For example, the COVID-19 crisis has created short and long-term negative impacts on supply shortages and disrupting supply operations around the world. To reduce the negative effects of the disruptions, many firms have changed the way they interact with their SCN members. Particularly, the disruption has profound impacts on suppliers (regardless of their tiers), buyers, and how buyer-supplier relationships are governed in a maritime SCN. Maritime SCNs have been responsible for the vast majority of global trade and are becoming increasingly complex and dynamic. Therefore, maritime SCNs can be significantly vulnerable to disruptions.

Since digital technologies can have a positive impact on mitigating disruptions, many firms have decided to implement various industry 4.0 applications to manage their maritime SCN. This has transformed the relationship between buyers and suppliers within the maritime SCN. However, there is still a strong need to explore different aspects of industry 4.0 applications in managing the relationships within the maritime SCNs to mitigate the disruptions. Therefore, this project will address this issue by investigating the impact of industry 4.0 technologies on developing appropriate relationships between buyers and suppliers to mitigate maritime SCN disruptions.

Eligibility
  • Good understanding of supply chain management and procurement functions
  • High level written and communication skills
  • Good analytical skills
  • Work or research experience in supply chain management

Desirable Skills

  • Good knowledge of big data analytics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Hadi Rezaei Vandchali for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Women are generally underrepresented in the STEM fields and in entrepreneurial ventures linked to high technology domains. This project will use the latest psychological and sociological research to propose a framework to facilitate that more girls and young women enter and remain in those STEM and entrepreneurial fields where they are significantly underrepresented. The framework will be designed to actively encourage creativity, inventiveness, and global awareness in harmony with the development of a socially responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial mindset. Strategies will be designed, tested and fine-tuned in diverse settings within the secondary and tertiary education sectors, and within the emerging Tasmanian STEM-based entrepreneurial ecosystem, respectively.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project aims to control the voltage and frequency of the electrical power system by employing Distributed Energy Resources (DERs). By changing the types of generation units from conventional to non-nonconventional, the penetration level of DERs including PVs, Electric Vehicles, Batteries, partially and fully rated wind energy conversion systems, thermal variable loads etc. are increasing in the grid. As the solid-state devices, the DERs do not contribute in inertial response if there is any contingency event in the network. Therefore, the power system is fragile, and the frequency control needs special considerations.

In this project, the candidate will work on innovative control approaches of the DERs to contribute in the primary and secondary responses after any event occurs. The candidate also considers new methods to coordinate DERs in voltage and frequency response in a power system with moderate and high penetration of DERs. In that case, the candidate is also expected to study about scheduling and dispatch of resources in a way that to ensure operation within network constrains all the times.

Eligibility
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in Electrical Engineering
  • Applicants must have excellent writing and communication skills (Please see the English Test requirements, TOEFL or IELTS tests, for PhD candidates on the website of the university).
    Experience with modelling and simulation tools.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Power Engineering (power electronics and/or power systems)
Selection Criteria
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
    Applicants must have Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (probably, Honours BEng Degree First Class, or Master's by Research, or equivalent).
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must be able to work with others as part of a project team and be willing to take direction.
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as PSCAD, Python, and MATLAB.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Evan Franklin and Behzad Naderi for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Hobart based shipbuilder, INCAT, builds some of the world's largest and fastest high speed aluminium catamaran ferries. Critical to the success of INCAT's vessels has been their ability to operate at high speed in heavy seas, and INCAT's position as worldwide leaders in their market niche has been assisted over more than two decades by ongoing collaborative research with the University of Tasmania's School of Engineering. A long term goal is to optimise the ship structure, minimising weight without compromising integrity at critical locations. Past recent research in this area has sought to quantify the loads exerted during a slam (severe wave impact) event. Structural vibrations following a slam (known as "whipping") are known to significantly modify the internal forces as determined by a quasi static analysis, and their effect has been partially quantified through testing of a 2.5m hydroelastic model, full scale strain measurements, and dynamic finite element analysis. The current project aims to extend this work by relating the asymmetric slams and bending moments to the asymmetric design loads within the superstructure connecting the two hulls (referred to as "pitch connecting moment" and "split loads") whilst further quantifying the motions response in oblique sea directions. This has the capacity to influence international design codes and to provide a more rational framework for the determination of design loads in similar ships worldwide.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in shipping industry
  • Model testing experience in towing tanks or model test basins
  • Marine engineering or naval architecture academic background
  • Experience in use of Computational Fluid Mechanics and/or Finite Element Analysis

More Information

Please contact Dr Jason Lavroff for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus on obtaining an improved understanding of how best to design much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania. This research project will seek to:

  • Identify current ways in which Tasmanian middle-, high-, and senior secondary-school students may recognize possible existing educational pathways leading up to tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Characterize any existing conflicting messages (or misconceptions present) along those pathways that may discourage Tasmanian students from further exploring their potential interest in secondary or tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Jointly build with Tasmanian career counsellors, guardians and parents, principals, students, and teachers a suite of comprehensive, holistic, and inclusive perspectives on what future Engineering careers may entail;
  • Jointly design with Tasmanian Engineering academics and practitioners a suite of state-of-the-art field-tested tools so that they are better able to engage with their primary and secondary school counterparts;
  • Actively encourage multi-sector and multi-stakeholder collaborative involvement in the design, implementation, and evaluation of place-based mission-critical action-oriented strategies that lead to much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania; and
  • Embed the latest inclusion, diversity and equity research in the re-engineering of the education pathways that are the focus of this Ph.D. level work.
Eligibility
  • The applicant should have several publications indexed in the Web of Science (WoS)
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the WoS would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • WoS publications by the applicant as a first author will tend to attract extra merit points

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Bernardo Leon de la Barra for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus in obtaining an improved theoretical understanding of the time- and frequency-domain properties of fractional-order linear-time invariant single-input single-output control systems. Thus, the proposed research work will be conducted simultaneously in both the time- and frequency-domains and seek to more closely relate several fundamental concepts in each domain to others in the counterpart domain. In particular, this research project will seek to:

  1. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the time-domain features of their impulse and step responses;
  2. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the behaviour of the frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics of those systems;
  3. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their impulse and step responses;
  4. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their frequency-domain responses;
  5. Propose new fractional-order controller design methodologies for the closed-loop control of fractional-order plants that make use of the results obtained in parts a) to d).

Some of the fundamental time- and frequency-domain concepts which will be instrumental in progressing the proposed research include: extrema in the time-domain step responses, pole-zero patterns, and frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics.

Eligibility
  • The applicant should have a number of publications indexed in the Web of Science
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the Web of Science would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply: Engineering, Mathematics and Science 

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Bernardo Leon de la Barra for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This PhD project will develop appropriate techno-economic models for Tasmania's energy system, including its interaction with the NEM, to analyse a wide range of likely future scenarios and their implications.

The proposed project introduces several areas of novelty and originality. The innovations include joint engineering and economic modelling of generation and storage technology characteristics and their role in meeting short-term power system requirements as well as their role in balancing energy supply and demand and their implications for energy markets. Included in the analysis of future scenarios is the significant transition to or increase in flexible loads such as electrified transport, hydrogen synthesis for export markets, and for direct export of energy over possible future additional interconnects.

This project will be co-supervised by members of Future Energy in the School of Engineering and the Tasmanian School of Business and Economics and will also be supported by Future Energy co-directors and other members.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Applicants must either have Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (Honours BEng Degree First Class, or Master's by Research, or equivalent) or a Master's research degree in Economics AND an undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (or equivalent).

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must be able to work with others as part of a project team and be willing to take direction
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as PSCAD, Python, and MATLAB
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Evan Franklin for further information.

Closing Date

28th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is aimed to further develop a both two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid finite discrete element method parallelized on the basis of general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) using compute unified architecture device C/C++ for studying dynamic fracture of rock under impact and cyclic loads and arching behaviour of resultant irregular-shaped deformable and further breakable fragments.

The outcome of this project will improve the rock mass excavation / fragmentation efficiency in rock cutting, drilling, crushing and blasting, and improve the rock mass stability in surface and underground excavation in mining, tunnelling and civil engineering. This project will improve our access to natural resources, especially deep or offshore natural resources, and safeguard our existing and new infrastructures.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Hong Liu for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The State of Tasmania exhibits some of the lowest levels of educational attainment among Australia’s states and territories. This project will use the latest educational, psychological and sociological research to design practical research- and evidence-based strategies to enthuse Tasmanian children to fully engage during their schooling years. The strategies will collectively target and inclusively align the many stakeholders (parents, guardians, teachers, peers, career counsellors, etc.) that play a role in influencing children’s aspirations for a better and brighter future. The strategies will be designed, tested, evaluated, and fine-tuned in diverse formal and informal educational settings. The project will make use of trans-disciplinary and integrative learning approaches with a strong focus on bridging the gap between the STEM and STEAM domains.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Bernardo Leon de la Barra, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Wildlife roadkill is a world-wide issue being tackled by using a large array of mitigation methods that have variable efficacy. Tasmania has a significant roadkill issue, and several endemic species that are highly vulnerable to roadkill. One existing method of roadkill mitigation uses an electronic device that is triggered by a car's headlights at night, warning wildlife that a vehicle is nearby through flashing amber and blue lights and a high-pitched siren. These particular devices are manufactured in Austria and have been operating with apparent success in many European countries, reducing wildlife vehicle collisions with big game species such as deer and wild boar.

Between 2014 and 2016 a trial was conducted on the west coast of Tasmania to determine whether these European devices worked on Australian species, especially marsupials, many of which are threatened species. While the initial trial was set up simply to test the field efficacy of these devices, the success of the trial led to the results being published ("Roadkill mitigation: trialling virtual fence devices on the west coast of Tasmania", Australian Mammalogy, 2019, 41, 205–211). However, this trial was conducted at a single site with no replication, and a similar published study conducted on a highway close to Hobart for 3 months did not produce the same positive results ("A trial of a solar-powered, cooperative sensor/actuator, opto-acoustical, virtual road-fence to mitigate roadkill in Tasmania, Australia", Animals, 2019, 9 (10), 752).

The disparity in the results between the two studies has raised questions about the conditions under which these particular electronic devices work to optimal efficacy (e.g., road type, vehicle volume, vehicle speed, road undulation and curve, etc.), but also whether the specific light waves and sound waves used as the "alarm signal" are going to be more effective with some of our native species compared to others.

The broad focus of this PhD project is to determine whether there are ways that could make the existing devices more effective and species specific, thus reducing roadkill even more. The final aim will be to design, build and field-test a state-of-the-art (and hopefully low-cost) electronic device with wide-spread testing, at numerous sites in Tasmania, for a number of endemic species, and under a variety of scenarios (such as road type and vehicle speed, as mentioned above).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates.
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, such as a research Master's degree or a coursework Master's degree with a substantial research component awarded high marks, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.

Candidates with a Science, Technology or Engineering background are eligible to apply.

Please see the following web page for entry requirements: https://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now webpage.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Bernardo Leon de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Currently, there are numerous methods and techniques aimed at extending the service life or repair existing structural elements. Bolting or welding of steel plates, applying CFRP and external prestressed tendons are the most common among these techniques. Nevertheless, these techniques have limitations and disadvantages such as increasing the self-weight of the structure, introducing stress concentration, reducing the fatigue lie of the structure or high labour and materials cost. Among the recently developed repairing and upgrading methods is the so-called Local Post-Tensioning (LPT) which increases the stiffness and the load carrying capacity of the structural member through adding reinforcing steel bars to a segment of the beam.

This project will be investigating the use of innovative strengthening and upgrading techniques (or their combinations) in order to extend the service life and restore the load carrying capacity of various steel, concrete or composite structural elements. The candidate will be using nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, experiments, or both to validate theoretical findings.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Civil (Structural  Engineering)

More Information

Please contact Dr Assaad Taoum to discuss prior to applying.

Closing Date

1st February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Offshore aquaculture offers a potential solution to environmental impacts from coastal, shallow water farming. With the deeper water and high energy environments waste from fish can be diluted, offering a low risk input to the marine environment. However, we know little about how the benthic regions react to nutrients in these locations.

This project will align methods for measuring fluxes in these offshore locations, with biogeochemical models to build a predictive capacity to measure the impacts at potential sites. If you are an applied mathematician or an ecosystem/physical modeller with highly developed quantitative skills, then this PhD would be suitable for your consideration.

Eligibility
  • Honours degree or higher in Applied Mathematics or other Physical Sciences
  • Highly developed skills in computer programming
  • Experience in producing high level scientific publications. Knowledge of process/biogeochemical modelling
  • Programming experience in Matlab, Python or C++
  • Experience in coastal marine fieldwork

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Scott Hadley for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will focus on defining optimum protein quality by determining essential amino acid requirements for juvenile topical and slipper lobsters. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the importance of between meal changes in tissue amino acid supply, balance and fluxes into growth or metabolism. The research will combine established and cutting-edge methods to understand amino acid metabolism at multiple levels and specifically related to how well amino acid requirements are being met or not met.

Classic factorial modelling of amino acid requirements will establish the base experimental approach. Advanced respirometry, combining oxygen consumption with carbon dioxide and nitrogenous excretion, will determine changes in substrate utilization within 24-h cycles and incorporate between meal changes in amino acid supply to tissues. Protein turnover will be measured because it underlies growth, is strongly influenced by dietary protein quality (amino acid balance) and has high energy costs. Stable isotope tracking to the level of specific amino acids will be developed and provide further detail on metabolic pathways and specific amino acid retention efficiencies (e.g. Barreto-Curiel et al 2019). Targeted transcriptomics will then be used to understand how gene regulation relates to differences in amino acid fluxes. The research will ultimately help explain mechanisms that underpin differences in whole-animal growth efficiency and provide a detailed basis for feed formulation.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, animal behaviour and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis. Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

2nd November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This PhD will investigate the feasibility of using trans-generational immunity as a health management strategy in lobster aquaculture. Trans-generational immune priming (TGIP) is the ability to impart immune responses from the parent’s immunological experience to enhance the immune responses of their offspring. The incorporation of into a health management strategy has the potential to control diseases in crustacean aquaculture. Therefore, before the potential benefit of these phenomena can be realised it is important that the life stage‐specific host–pathogen interactions are understood in the context of the specific disease to be managed.

The test species will be the slipper lobster (SL) Thenus australiensis, culture of this species is in its infancy and to date very few diseases have impacted any stage of the culture. Despite this apparent relative freedom from disease several microorganisms have been identified as potential disease-causing agents in this species. The putative pathogen Aquimarina sp. is believed to be responsible for a condition termed ‘white leg’ disease and has been identified as a health priority. When present this bacterial pathogen results in significant mortality of SL phyllosoma.
Research will be performed to characterise the ontogenic immune response of the SL and investigate the host-pathogen interaction during ‘white leg’ disease both within and across generations.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, animal behaviour and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis. Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Oceanic fronts are sharp gradients between adjoining water masses and serve as mixing boundaries between water with different features (Belkin, 2009). Frontal processes, across a variety of temporal and spatial scales, operate in concert to drive coastal ecosystem structure and function. Climate change can have a profound effect on front formation leading to changes, which have important consequences for biodiversity. Furthermore, changes in concentration of one or a few 'leverage species' may result in sweeping communitylevel changes raising concerns about fishery sustainability, ecosystem health, and the maintenance of global biogeochemical cycles (Woodson and Litvin, 2015) in coastal regions. Conflicting studies show scenarios of both increasing and decreasing frontal probability due to climate change. It has been shown that there can a reduction in frontal frequency during warming anomalies. However, long term decadal-scale records show increasing trends of frontal activity. Regardless, the trend in front probability has not been shown to be globally uniform.

The first aim of this research is to comprehensively verify global trends of frontal frequency within global marine hotspots and resolve fine-scale frontal features (using new high-resolution satellite imagery) to assess patterns and trends in regional scale hotspot areas. Furthermore, given the variety of scales at which fronts operate, it is critically important to understand frontal activity at depth integrated submesoscales. As fronts play a role in driving local biological activity, unravelling the role of submesoscale dynamics on phytoplankton abundance and diversity is important for quantifying global influence on marine ecosystems.

The second aim of this research is to develop adaptive sampling algorithms for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to characterize submesoscale fronts across depth integrated measurements. When coupled with high resolution satellite measurements (above), unprecedented scales of frontal processes can be visualized.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of remote sensing algorithm development and satellite image processing
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Marine environments are under increasing stress from organic pollution, generated from a range of anthropogenic sources. In this project the student will use benthic imagery data (AUV, ROV and towed video) to develop a baseline of the deep reef biodiversity of Storm Bay and a literature review to identify any potential indicator species. The student will collect and collate benthic imagery to assess the natural spatial and temporal variation in the deep reef communities, and to test the potential influence of organic enrichment and sedimentation on key species and metrics.

The results will be used to support the development of methods for monitoring the health of deep reef habitats and the potential impacts of anthropogenic activities such as organic pollution and sedimentation.

Eligibility
  • First class honours
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: marine ecology and quantitative ecology
  • Experience in field sampling, imagery and use of statistical programs including R gui

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Beth Strain for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Aquaculture is an important industry that is developing rapidly in temperate coastal regions worldwide. While soft-sediment impacts have been relatively well described, there is much less know regarding trophic interactions and how marine food webs may uptake and assimilate additional organic carbon loadings. As aquaculture continues to expand, a greater understanding of these trophic linkages is vital for sustainable development.

Sponges are sessile filter-feeders that are a ubiquitous feature on temperate reefs worldwide. They can be sensitive to organic enrichment, with increases in sedimentation potentially smothering sponges and limiting their capacity to feed and respire effectively. However, they also have the capacity to remove both particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the water column. With a high filtering capacity and association with diverse microbial communities, they are a key link in carbon flow from pelagic to benthic systems and a potential pathway for mitigating aquaculture waste into marine ecosystems. While the role of sponge communities in POC and DOC cycling in tropical reef systems is acknowledged, the capacity for this in temperate reef systems is less well understood. This PhD will explore the assimilatory capacity of temperate reef sponge communities and their potential interaction with finfish aquaculture.

Eligibility
  • Applicants should have a first class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in biological science or human impacts research, with demonstrated experience in the key research areas. Scientific Diver, or similar relevant qualifications or the ability to obtain these are also required
  • Demonstrated experience in laboratory based respiration or metabolism experiments would be beneficial, along with knowledge of temperate reef ecosystems or experience in natural resource management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Camille White for further information.

Closing Date

2nd November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will examine the effect of behaviour and social structures on growth, survival and feeding from the 1st juvenile stage lobsters to market size. High mortality can occur in the early juvenile rearing of P. ornatus. One of the contributing factors is the tendency for cannibalism, particularly in the early juvenile stages. This behavioural trait will be one of the focal points for this study. As spiny lobsters have complex social structures further aspects of their culture performance is very likely to be influence by behaviour. Social structures are likely to influence feeding (disparity and timing) and growth (disparity) with size, gender, stocking density, shelter availability, tank configuration and ontogeny.

Much of the behavioural data of this study will be collected via the use of videography and may also include the use of hydrophones to explore acoustic communication to better understand social structure and behaviour. There will also be a molecular analysis (e.g. transcriptome profiling) within the study of aggression, dominance-subordinance and cannibalism. Experimentation will include both longer term trials that mimic commercial rearing and short term experiments where animals will be held in various combinations on smaller scales to better characterise behaviour.

Eligibility
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, animal behaviour and/or molecular biology (project specific).
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

*unless filled earlier

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Scott Ling and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

This project will include a AUD$28,092 per annum living allowance scholarship for 3.5 years with no extension.

The scholarship is funded by ARC DECRA, via the College of Sciences and Engineering, UTAS.

The Research Project

Ocean warming is driving radical changes to coastal ecosystems worldwide. However, not all locations or species are affected equally by warming, meaning that important ecological processes may manifest differently through space and time. Among the most important biotic relationships on temperate reefs are plant–herbivore interactions involving foundation species such as kelps and fucoids, and herbivores such as fishes and sea urchins. Herbivores play a core role on temperate reefs, overgrazing structural seaweed canopies and reinforcing alternative turf- or barren-dominated ecosystem states.

Moreover, warm-affiliated herbivores are rapidly extending their range into cool-temperate ecosystems, resulting in new plant–herbivore interactions with diverse implications. Currently, we have a rudimentary understanding of the effects of temperature on species interactions and how interactions change across the thermal distribution of species.
Differences in thermal performance between trophic levels has the potential to fundamentally modify the intensity of species interactions both across species ranges' and in response to warming. For example, higher thermal sensitivity of seaweeds than consumers could facilitate over-grazing and exacerbate the loss of kelp forests and diverse seaweed communities.

This project aims to determine how the thermal performance of dominant kelps and herbivores, changes across the biogeographical distribution of species and what this means for temperate reef resilience in a warmer future.

Eligibility
  • High proficiency in scientific writing with 1+ first author peer-reviewed publications
  • Training and experience analysing big data
  • SCUBA certification + >30 hrs experience underwater.

Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply.

Selection Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Scott Ling for further information.

Closing Date

4th October 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The red handfish (Thymichthys politus) is a critically endangered species endemic to south-eastern Tasmania. Restricted to two small populations in Fredrick Henry Bay, the decline in red handfish numbers has been dramatic in recent years and now fewer than 100 adults remain. This project will form a vital component of the strategies being used to save this species from extinction. Core to the project will be defining optimal environmental conditions for rearing wild-collected juveniles in captivity, and to undertake the first steps of establishing a capture breeding program. This project will comprise a blend of aquaculture principals, ecophysiology, reproductive biology and ecological monitoring.

Laboratory experimentation will examine growth and behaviour parameters in juvenile captive fish to develop better understanding of the species biology and ecology, and help refine captive-rearing programs that are necessary to supplement declining wild populations. It will also investigate whether hormone samples collected from the water to determine gender will be important in informing captive-breeding. Field work will examine of the success of handfish reintroduction programs and also be used to gather information on the ecology of the species.

The candidate will require knowledge of aquaculture systems, the ability to complete exacting laboratory experimentation and undertake long days in the field. Contribution to project design is expected, but fieldwork plans must necessarily be aligned with other activities (i.e. release of animals). The candidate will be based at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at Taroona, with some laboratory work undertaken at IMAS, Launceston.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology and zoology or similar are encouraged to apply
  • Aquaculture experience (knowledge of tank systems, maintenance, set-up, general marine fish husbandry skills)
  • SCUBA diving experience and qualifications sufficient for registration on the UTAS dive register
  • Ability to use R for statistical analyses
  • Familiarity with general ecological and marine species literature

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Andrew Trotter for further information.

Closing Date

1st September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

This project will support marine conservation and small-scale fisheries management throughout the Indo-Pacific region by developing novel strategies to incorporate data on fish movements into management decision making. The project will form part of ongoing research projects at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, providing exciting opportunities for the successful candidate to build an international network and impact real-world management decisions.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated skills or strong interest in complex quantitative and spatial data analysis
  • Strong interest in marine science, conservation planning and fisheries management
  • Strong communication skills (oral and written) and a keen interest in scientific publications
  • Willingness to learn programming languages (Matlab and R)
  • Demonstrated capacity to work independently

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Nils Krueck for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will continue development of remote, video-based platforms such as ROVs and BRUVs for undertaking inventory and monitoring of fishes associated with deep shelf reefs and associated soft sediment habitats as part of a group based at IMAS. It will compare and contrast alternative approaches in a number of regional settings and contribute to the refinement of a suite of standard operating protocols for inventory and monitoring of these systems in response to management needs, such as implementation of marine parks and offshore expansion of intensive aquaculture.

Eligibility
  • Sound knowledge of the core principles of coastal marine ecology and the physical drivers of ecosystems
  • A background in quantitative marine science or similar, such as the 3rd year quantitative methods unit offered by UTas/IMAS
  • Experience in operation of coastal vessels

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Neville Barrett for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This PhD project supports the ARC Research Hub for Sustainable Onshore Lobster Aquaculture. The overall goal is to 'domesticate' one or more tropical seaweed species not previously grown in on-shore aquaculture, and test their suitability for integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the rock lobster (Panulirus ornatus).

Eligibility
  • Experience in marine macroalgal (seaweed) nutrient and photosynthetic physiology
  • Experience cultivating seaweeds
  • Experimental design
  • Statistical analysis of data
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Catriona Hurd for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Marine environments are under increasing stress from organic pollution, generated from anthropogenic sources such as sewage outflows and aquaculture activities. In soft-sediment environments, organic pollutants can result in changes in the community structure of the bacterial and macrofauna communities (i.e. OTU or species density and richness and abundances of opportunistic or pollution sensitive species). This project will develop critical insights into how to effectively monitor organic pollution in the marine environment using newly developed molecular and functional approaches.

Eligibility
  • First class honours
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: marine ecology, quantitative ecology, molecular ecology with an interest or experience in working across multiple disciplines
  • Experience in field sampling, molecular ecology, and use of statistical programs including R gui

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Beth Strain for further information.

Closing Date

10th March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) and in particular seaweed aquaculture has huge potential, with estimates suggesting this could be a $100M industry by 2025. This project seeks to support the development of a sustainable integrated aquaculture model and viable seaweed industry in Tasmania/ Australia by providing a more realistic understanding of the true economic value of this industry; identifying costs and benefits, including the intangible costs, and trade-offs so that managers and investors can make fully informed decisions.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or equivalent in Resource Economics, Human Geography, Natural Resource Management, Social Sciences, Environmental Science or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Background in multicriteria analysis and/or marine resource management or resource economics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will improve the characterization of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current fronts variability and change. The analysis is circumpolar with the observational and reanalysis datasets.

Eligibility
  • Strong background in Mathematics and Physics. Matlab or Python coding and shell scripting experience
  • Ocean dynamics, datasets analysis, ease with heavily computing based work

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Maxim Nikurashin for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Adaptation of socioecological systems and management approaches to climate change and other global drivers requires an understanding of the time available for action to be taken (before change is irreversible or catastrophic) as well as identifying thresholds beyond which actions would be much more costly to take. A common question among managers and operators in marine system is "at what level of change in (environmental) variable x might I see significant change in my resource y". For example, "what level of temperature increase will result in my fish stock reducing to less than half of its current abundance". Similar questions exist in relation to social and economic thresholds: "at what level of change would my profit reduce by more than half", or "at what level of change would it be non-viable for me to employ staff".

Such thresholds and 'tipping points' have been considered separately for biophysical and socioeconomic systems, but there is limited research into how such tipping points and their drivers might interact. This project will use inter- and transdisciplinary approaches to examine socioecological tipping points for marine systems in three case studies that differ in their climatic zones, ecosystem characteristics, socioeconomic context, as well as management and governance frameworks. It will aim to develop a general framework to characterise the nature of socioecological tipping points in marine systems, as well as to assess the drivers of and vulnerabilities to tipping points in each of the case studies. Results will assist in adaptation strategies for marine socioecological systems and help to inform the identification of time windows in which actions should be taken to minimise the risk of collapse or significant change.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours or Masters equivalent research in marine ecosystem and/or social science or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Inter- and transdisciplinary research, knowledge co-production

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Kirsty Nash for further information.

Closing Date

1st April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Significant quantities of plastic debris pollute nearly all the world's ecosystems, where it persists for decades. Much of the focus has been on the considerable threat posed to flora and fauna, with little information on techniques to manage the waste, as well as mitigate harm to tourism or other industries, particularly on remote islands where debris often accumulates.

The PhD candidate will investigate examples of successful waste mitigation that will enable remote island communities to manage and adapt to changing conditions. The candidate will benefit from existing stakeholder and community networks to identify and prioritise mitigation options while being supported by a diverse supervisory team.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in environmental science
  • High level oral and written communication skills including at least one publication in an international, peer-reviewed journal
  • Ability to work independently and as a productive member of a team
  • Experience in applied research, working with the community, government, or in natural resource management
  • Detailed knowledge of oceanography or engineering systems

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Jennifer Lavers for further information.

Closing Date

1st April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Humankind needs to remove 100-900 gigatons CO2 from atmosphere by the end of the 21st century to keep global warming below 2°C. This herculean task depends on the wide-ranging application of so-called negative emission technologies (NETs). Unfortunately, not a single NET has been proven to function at the gigaton-scale. One of the most promising ideas is to accelerate weathering reactions of minerals that consume CO2 when they dissolve (known as "Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement"). However, the desired consumption of atmospheric CO2 during dissolution would inevitably perturb the oceans with huge amounts of mineral dissolution products (alkalinity, Si, trace metals).

This PhD project will investigate if and how Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement could affect growth and metabolic rates of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for ~50% of primary production on Earth. The candidate will conduct a range of laboratory incubation experiments and participate in at least one international ship-voyage in the South Pacific. This enables us to cover phytoplankton from different biomes including key functional types, such as diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. The overarching goal is to contribute, significantly, to the assessment of Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement as a tool to counteract climate change.

Eligibility
  • Honours or Master degree in biological or chemical oceanography or closely related field (e.g. environmental microbiology). Preferably experience with phytoplankton
  • Great abilities to work in teams and collaborative environments
  • Ability to spend extended periods abroad or on international research vessels during field studies
  • Enthusiasm for scientific discourse and progress
  • Fluent English skills
  • Very good writing skills
  • Reliable and highly motivated

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Lennart Bach for further information.

Closing Date

1st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Humankind needs to remove 100-900 gigatons CO2 from atmosphere by the end of the 21st century to keep global warming below 2°C. This herculean task depends on the wide-ranging application of so-called negative emission technologies (NETs). Unfortunately, not a single NET has been proven to function at the gigaton-scale. One of the most promising ideas is to accelerate weathering reactions of minerals that consume CO2 when they dissolve (known as "Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement"). However, the desired consumption of atmospheric CO2 during dissolution would inevitably perturb the oceans with huge amounts of mineral
dissolution products (alkalinity, Si, trace metals).

This PhD project will investigate if and how Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement could affect growth and metabolic rates of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for ~50% of primary production on Earth. The candidate will conduct a range of laboratory incubation experiments and participate in at least one international ship-voyage in the South Pacific. This enables us to cover phytoplankton from different biomes including key functional types, such as diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. The overarching goal is to contribute, significantly, to the assessment of Ocean Alkalinity

Eligibility
  • Honours or Master degree in biological or chemical oceanography or closely related field (e.g. environmental microbiology). Preferably experience with phytoplankton
  • Great abilities to work in teams and collaborative environments
  • Ability to spend extended periods abroad or on international research vessels during field studies
  • Enthusiasm for scientific discourse and progress
  • Fluent English skills
  • Very good writing skills
  • Reliable and highly motivated

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Lennart Bach for further information.

Closing Date

1st March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) and in particular seaweed aquaculture has huge potential, with estimates suggesting this could be a $100M industry by 2025. This project seeks to support the development of a sustainable integrated aquaculture model and viable seaweed industry in Tasmania/ Australia by providing an understanding of the potential impacts of biofouling and how that might be affected by regional and temporal differences with a view to optimising site selection and husbandry practices.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology, or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Background in aquatic botany, environmental science or aquaculture

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

28th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) affect seafood production due to loss of stock, or due to biotoxins, or lead to major ecosystem shifts. Advance-warning of such events provide coastal managers and aquaculture operations within time to take mitigating steps, or manage stock and harvest activity around such events.

This project aims to take advantage of long-term marine national reference station (NRS) and other environmental to develop predictive models for HAB events. The student will combine NRS data with additional high-resolution transciptome data machine-learning approaches to generate bloom prediction models and forecasting capacity over 5-30 day timescales. The models will be used to inform the development and design of in-situ HAB monitoring systems for Tasmania's eastern shelf and coastal waters.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in phytoplankton ecology/biology, or microbiology and/or molecular biology are encouraged to apply
  • Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships
  • Candidates with strong computing skills, quantitative/modelling skills, or experience analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Christopher Bolch for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Marine environments are under increasing stress from organic pollution, generated from anthropogenic sources such as salmon aquaculture activities. Globally, salmon aquaculture is developing rapidly in Tasmania and elsewhere. This could have significant benefits for the economy and coastal communities, but it is important that such growth is environmentally sustainable, well-regulated and socially acceptable in the local community.

To address these needs, salmon aquaculture companies are seeking to expand their production into more exposed locations, offshore environments and by co-culturing multiple species through the process of integrated multitrophic aquaculture. This project will for the first-time asses the social license and potential sources of conflicts of these three options (i.e. exposed locations, offshore and integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) at both government and industry level using four key case-study locations, Tasmania, New Zealand, Norway and Scotland.

Eligibility
  • First class honours
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: social science, policy, marine ecology with an interest or experience in working across multiple disciplines
  • Experience in surveys, interviews and participatory mapping

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Karen Alexander for further information.

Closing Date

2nd November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This PhD will aim to quantify mineralisation of the exoskeleton of juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters as a function of endogenous (stored) and exogeneous (food and environment) mineral sources. Mineral fluxes in crustacean around moulting signifies specific physiological adaptations particularly aiming at maintaining the acid-base homeostasis. It is a common knowledge that at the pre-moult stage, minerals are resorbed from the old cuticle and at post-moult stage, the new cuticle is mineralised. Crustacea have some specific mechanisms to store resorbed minerals, particularly calcium from the old cuticle and which is made available to mineralise the new cuticle at post-moult. However, this endogenous source of mineral is not considered significant in marine crustacea due to it being readily available in the environment. Therefore, it is generally accepted that food and the environment are the main source for minerals in marine crustacea and the relative importance of these two sources are species dependent.

At present, the ability for juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters to store and reutilise resorbed minerals is unknown. Similarly, the relative contributions of minerals from food and the environment is as well unknown for these two species. A quantitative assessment of the three potential mineral sources (stored, food and environment) which makes up the exoskeleton is key to feed formulation. The PhD will employ a wide range of analytical tools to further understanding of the mechanism by which the acid-base balance in juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters is maintained.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, animal behaviour and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis. Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

1st June 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctic marine ecosystems provide ecosystem services that are important on a global scale, and there is a strong imperative to understand and predict the responses of these systems and services to current and future climate change. An implementation of the Atlantis end-to-end ecosystem model has been developed for the East Antarctic region, and is well suited to exploring scenarios to evaluate potential climate change impacts on ecosystem structure and function.

In this project, the successful candidate will work with modelling experts to complete the calibration of the East Antarctic Atlantis model, and to use the calibrated model to explore simple scenarios for ecosystem change. In the second part of the project, the candidate will update representations of sea ice and ice-dependent species in the model, and consider more detailed scenarios for change in sea ice habitats.

Eligibility
  • First class Honours or Masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming, and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems
  • Experience with C and R programming languages, ecosystem modelling, knowledge of Antarctic marine ecosystem and climate change

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sophie Bestley for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Set within a broader integrated strategy, encompassing genetic control, this Ph.D. project will build on historic capture data, daily age structure and reproductive traits at field sites on the southern (Tamar Estuary, Tasmania) and northern (Edgbaston reserve, Queensland) extremities of Gambusia incursions in Australia. This to assess population and incursion dynamics (including the scale of incursions) at the study sites, and if feasible, to develop broad-scale predictive models across the latitudinal cline, incorporating environmental data (e.g., temperature, photoperiod, pH and turbidity).

The study is expected to provide valuable information for designing suppression measures and managing invasiveness of G. holbrooki populations at the sites and for making predictions across the latitudinal bounds.

Eligibility
  • Honours or equivalent degree in Biology with specialisation is Fisheries or Fish biology
  • Experience in ageing fish, assessment of population parameters, population dynamics and quantitative platforms such as R and Python are desirable
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their entry level research degree (honours/masters), prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jawahar Patil for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

During the last glacial period, and during previous glacial periods of the late quaternary, atmospheric CO2 was 80 – 100 ppm lower than during interglacial periods, representing a potent agent of climate feedback. Changes in ocean carbon cycling, including increased biological carbon export and a decreased rate of ocean overturning circulation, contributed to carbon drawdown from the atmosphere during glacial periods. However, the relative importance of these mechanisms across the last glacial cycle, both temporally and spatially, remains poorly resolved.

Working within an international team, this project will explore ocean carbon uptake mechanisms in the poorly sampled southern Indian Ocean across the most recent glacial cycle. The student will analyse geochemical proxies of biological productivity and bottom water oxygen in a suite of sediment cores collected in 2018. The cores were collected from water depths ranging from ~1000 – 5000m, and present an opportunity to use past changes in carbonate preservation with depth to constrain deep ocean carbon storage.

In the second year of the project there may be an opportunity to join a voyage to collect new sediment cores from the far southern Indian Ocean, on the Antarctic slope.

Eligibility
  • A background in chemical oceanography, paleoceanography or geochemistry would be advantageous
  • Familiarity with quantitative data analysis approaches and tools, including scripting languages (Matlab/R/Python) is highly desirable
  • This project requires a student with strong chemistry lab skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zanna Chase for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The speed of Antarctic glaciers can vary substantially on tidal time scales. Using a combination of GPS observations and numerical modelling, this project will use glacier velocities to draw conclusions around ice shelf dynamics, the interaction of ice and its bed and the sensitivity of glaciers to changes in forcing.

Eligibility
  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent)
  • Demonstrably strong quantitative skills (mathematics and physics background)
  • Experience in coding/programming, particularly using Fortran
  • Understanding of glaciers and ice sheet behaviour
  • Experience in software development

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Sue Cook for further information.

Closing Date

1st March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Seaweeds are the base of coastal temperate ecosystems providing habitats, and supplying energy, to higher trophic levels. Ocean acidification and warming are a serious threat to coastal ecosystems that result from anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide. This project will examine the responses of seaweeds to both global (ocean acidification and warming) and local (light and nitrogen) drivers.

Eligibility
  • Expert knowledge on ocean acidification and its affect on seaweed metabolism
  • Seaweed photosynthetic physiology
  • Knowledge of seawater carbonate chemistry and its manipulation
  • Ability to work independently or in a team
  • Knowledge of experimental design and statistical analysis of data

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Catriona Hurd for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The ecological complexities of commercially exploited abalone, preclude the use of dynamic fishery assessment models. Instead, assessment of fisheries relies on application of Empirical Harvest Strategies (EHS) to assess fishery status and recommend sustainable total harvest levels. Development and application of EHS is at an early stage in abalone fisheries, with four different EHSs developed and applied across Australia's haliotid fisheries.

This project will assist in the development of a spatial Management Strategy Evaluation framework to assess the performance of the four EHS within a simulation framework, and identify strengths and weakness of each EHS. Specifically, the project will apply the MSE framework to a simulated population based on the Western Australian Roe's abalone Haliotis roei.

Eligibility
  • Numerate with good R code writing skills and experience. Ability to analyse spatial data
  • Experience with marine invertebrate biology
  • Basic understanding of fisheries and/or resource management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Craig Mundy for further information.

Closing Date

30th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Blue Economy will see significant investment in offshore marine and maritime industries. This project seeks to develop the robust marine spatial planning (MSP) tools to ensure this offshore development is sustainable - providing jobs, food, economic growth at the same time as supporting the ecosystem processes essential for the planet.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or Masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems and MSP concepts and tools
  • Background in multicriteria analysis and/or marine resource management and policy frameworks
  • Specific experience in MSP development and implementation
  • Experience in applying spatial analysis and mapping approaches for management and decision support systems (e.g. Marxan/MarxanWithZones, Ecospace, Atlantis, EMDS, Mara, ArcMap and R Programming)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

2nd November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. will aim to identify potential disease-causing agents in onshore lobster culture systems. With the intensification of lobster culture there is the suggestion that many putative pathogens will emerge that are yet to be identified or their associated diseases observed and reported.

Biosecurity is an essential aspect of this emerging aquaculture industry and it is vital to ensure that cultured lobsters are healthy to ensure the sustainability of lobster aquaculture. The closed-nature of onshore RAS provides the ability to monitor and treat all inputs and outputs to the system. This research will use portable real-time third generation nucleic acid sequencing to characterise the microbiota of the TRL/SL rearing system to provide a baseline as to what microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic microbes) are associated with the culture of healthy lobsters. This will allow the detection and identification of known and unknown pathogens that may enter the system or opportunistically impact the culture environment. It is envisaged that detailed knowledge of the microbiota and the ability to archive this information for future interrogation will lay the foundations for and allow onshore RAS lobster aquaculture to set a new standard for aquaculture biosecurity.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, animal behaviour and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis. Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Do you know how important Antarctic sea ice is for the global climate?

Neither do we (nor anyone else for that matter). But we do know that sea ice plays a key role in the global ocean's uptake of 90% of the heat trapped on the planet by anthropogenic emissions, so this is an important question. We are looking for a motivated, creative individual with strong quantitative skills to tackle that question, as part of a world-class team oceanographers and sea ice experts.
The successful applicant will use data from the state-of-science climate models that are used to inform IPCC reports, to investigate how Antarctic sea ice affects the circulation of the Southern Ocean, how well those processes are represented in the models, and the global implications of those processes in a warming climate.

Over the course of the project, the student will communicate their research in top tier scientific journals, and at domestic and international conferences.

Eligibility
  • Bachelors degree (with Honours) or Masters degree in a Mathematical or Physical Science discipline / Bachelors/Masters degree in oceanography, meteorology, or a related earth-science subject
  • Demonstrated experience in individual research (e.g. Honours thesis, Masters dissertation)
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills in English
  • Experience using a high-level scripting language for data analysis/visualisation (e.g. Python, MATLAB, NCL)
  • Experience in analysis or ocean, atmosphere or coupled model output

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Will Hobbs for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Quantifying the distribution and variability of phytoplankton abundance in the global oceans is a formidable challenge that has generated numerous instruments and approaches – all with their respective advantages and disadvantages. In the Southern Ocean, cloud cover frequently hampers satellite assessment of chlorophyll concentrations (Chl), and fluorescence sensors mounted on autonomous platforms may overestimate chlorophyll concentrations by up to a factor 8 (Roesler et al. 2017, L&O Methods, 15(6), 572-585). Confident estimates of global ocean productivity are similarly hampered by a lack of information regarding the physiological status of phytoplankton.

In this project, the successful candidate will explore data from optical instruments on moorings and biogeochemical Argo floats as well as satellites to improve estimates of Chl and of the physiological status of phytoplankton in the Subantarctic Southern Ocean. Most of the work is based on existing data, but oceanographic field work is a possible component of this project.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours or Masters equivalent research in a quantitative physical or biological science or engineering
  • High level of programming experience, preferably in Matlab, R or Python
  • Interest in ocean optics and phytoplankton photophysiology
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Familiarity with ocean biogeochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Christina Schallenberg for further information.

Closing Date

1st March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The proposed PhD project aims to quantify traits of reef species that determine their detectability using Underwater Visual Census methods. Traits-of-detectability will be defined for species and/ or higher-level taxonomy (including functional groups), and correction factors applied to account for any underlying biases in the detectability of species using UVC methods. The sensitivity of predicted patterns in biodiversity in space (local, regional and global scales) and through time to such correction factors will then be explored.

Eligibility
  • High proficiency in scientific writing with peer-reviewed publications (or publications in review process)
  • Extensive fieldwork and taxonomic skills with experience spanning SCUBA and non-SCUBA sampling, plus an ability to work remotely for extended periods
  • ADAS part 1 certification + > 80 hrs experience underwater
  • Knowledge of the use of R programming language for statistical analyses
  • Training and experience in analysing big data

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Scott Ling for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctic seabirds are susceptible to a range of influences at and near their breeding sites during the summer months, and across their extensive winter migratory ranges. Identifying how changes in marine and terrestrial habitats will effect seabirds will aid in their conservation.

This project will investigate the relationship between snow petrels and their environment using seabird foraging, at-sea, and breeding habitat observations and physical characteristics of the environment including sea-ice and wind field data. Data will be used to establish species-environment links and projected in line with CMIP6 climate model output to predict population changes in the future. Analyses will initially use statistical methods to identify key environmental factors that likely influence their distribution and abundance.

The snow petrel is an iconic species breeding in ice-free areas around the Antarctic continent. They feed primarily on fish and krill in the loose pack ice within reach of their colonies. Nesting locations are governed by their distance and access to productive feeding grounds as well as the availability of suitable cavities. Snow petrel performance is linked to regional sea ice concentration and extent through their dependence on sea-ice for foraging and the association between sea-ice and krill. Their main prey, Antarctic krill, depend on sea ice for their winter food supply and are the focus of a large fishery which make snow petrels an important indicator of ecosystem change.

Eligibility
  • An understanding of ocean and/or seabird ecology and ecosystem dynamics
  • Strong quantitative skills, Experience with analysis software such as Matlab, R, Python or GIS
  • An understanding of oceanographic fundamentals, An ability to work at sea, Ocean-going fieldwork experience focusing on bird observations
  • Experience/understanding of Southern Ocean birdlife Field work experience , Ability or capacity to develop the ability to work with complex datasets or model output

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stuart Corney for further information.

Closing Date

31st March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This study will investigate the dynamics, causes and structures of marine heatwaves from a Lagrangian perspective and proposes to develop a methodology to predict marine heatwaves on multiple timescales for the benefit of marine fisheries and ecosystem managers.

Eligibility
  • The equivalent of a Bachelor of Science Honours degree (first class or equivalent)
  • Background research in physical oceanography, atmospheric science or climate science; experience with coding in MATLAB or python; experience handling climate data in a Linux environment; demonstrably strong quantitative skills (mathematics and physics background)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Neil Holbrook for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Technology and social media have revolutionised the way we engage with causes and bring about change in the world. While some environmental issues are captured by community imagination, not all are acted on. What are the mechanisms that allow some to become accepted? The PhD candidate will investigate examples of successful local and global movements (e.g., school strike for climate) with the aim to identify the belief systems and behaviours behind their success. This cutting-edge project is at the nexus of truly multidisciplinary teams, encompassing IT, media, psychology, and environmental and social science. The candidate will use available IT resources and their skills in science communication to access social channels, identify successful movements, and propose new projects that allow communities to profile actions.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in environmental/social science
  • High level oral and written communication skills including at least one publication in an international, peer-reviewed journal
  • Ability to work independently and as a productive member of a team
  • Experience in applied research, working with the community, government, or in natural resource management
  • Proven capacity to use technology systems and IT literacy

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, conference presentations, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant work experience, and referee's reports
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jennifer Lavers for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the past decade, the main mass loss in the East Antarctica was dominated by the Wilkes Land, which was attributable to the increases in ocean-induced basal melt. Using a coupled ice sheet ocean model, this project will explore the ice ocean interaction to better understand the significant role of warm water intrusion on the ice sheet instability in Wilkes Land and inform future field campaigns in this region.

Eligibility
  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent)
  • Demonstrably strong quantitative skills
  • Experience with programming languages and analysis software such as python and Matlab
  • Understanding of ice dynamics or geophysical fluid dynamics or ice ocean interaction
  • Experience of numerical modelling

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Chen Zhao for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Graham Edgar and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project seeks to integrate metagenomics and traditional
underwater visual surveys of reef communities around Australia to
better understand the richness and distribution of marine
biodiversity, and the full complexity of food webs. The work will
provide a unique test and validation of eDNA/RNA approaches at a
range of scales that is currently unprecedented.

Eligibility
  • Training and experience in molecular biology techniques.
  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent) or Master of Science with independent research project.
  • Ability to complete requirements and register for diving at the University of Tasmania.
  • Extensive SCUBA diving experience.
  • Proficiency in R.
  • Training and experience in molecular biology techniques.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Selection Criteria:

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Graham Edgar for further information.

Closing Date

1st October 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Volcanism can supply substantial amount of essential nutrient iron to the ocean surface via ash, pumice or hydrothermal vents – the so-called “hot iron”. Whilst they do occur in the Southern Ocean, eruptions from the Heard and MacDonald Islands region are so poorly observed it is difficult to characterize the extent of volcanic contribution to the marine productivity in the region.

This project will evaluate the role of recent (satellite era) eruptions from Heard and MacDonald Islands to ocean fertilization, using a unique approach of estimating transport of “hot” iron to East Antarctic ice cores, and then measuring volcanic particles and iron in available ice core material. It will also evaluate any confounding signal from regional volcanism to globally significant volcanic signals in East Antarctic ice cores.

Eligibility
  • Geophysical and/or chemistry background
  • Data processing using R, Python, matlab or similar
  • Experience with ice core or trace iron sample processing, analytical chemistry, data analysis and proxy evaluation
  • Experience with atmospheric reanalyses datasets and/or model outputs

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Tessa Vance for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Plant hydraulic physiology has provided a new framework to understand plant competition, survival and growth. This project will examine how the physiology of plant water transport regulates the, timing, efficiency and resilience of reproductive growth and development. The project will use newly developed tools to probe the dynamics and vulnerabilities of water transport to understand reproductive strategy in crop and native plant systems.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Plant Science
  • Ecology
  • Plant Physiology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Tim Brodribb for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Eucalypts are foundation tree species that provide dependant habitat for many faunal species. Understanding the genetic and environmental influences on variation in key tree traits provides a strong framework for elucidating co-evolutionary and ecological interactions between plants and animals. Genetic-based variation in tree traits can also have flow-on consequences to the wider biotic community and ecosystem (known as community and ecosystem genetics) by structuring community assemblages and influencing ecosystem processes. These interactions and processes may be subject to change under changing environmental conditions including future climates. While a fundamental understanding of these interactions and processes is important, this knowledge also informs management decisions in forest management, including forest restoration programs.

This project will focus on understanding the genetic and environmental variation in manna production in Eucalyptus viminalis. Manna is an essential food resource for some dependant animal species including the endangered forty spotted pardalote in Tasmania. Building on preliminary studies, this project will work across large scale common garden trials and in native stands of E. viminalis to better understand the genetic and environmental drivers of manna production and manna quality. Depending on research interests of the successful applicant this multi-disciplinary study could incorporate aspects of field ecology, animal behaviour, plant quantitative genetics, analytical chemistry and climate modelling. The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work closely with conservation and restoration land managers.

The Supervisors for the project will be A/Prof Julianne O'Reilly-Wapstra, Dr Geoff While and Dr Peter Harrison

Eligibility
  • Applicants must have been awarded a First Class or Second Class (Uppers) Honours Degree, or a research Masters Degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Evidence of the ability to prepare scientific research for publication in international peer-refereed journals
  • Experience in basic statistical analysis in R
  • Interest in ecology and/or quantitative genetics, and/or analytical chemistry
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Current driving licence and a willingness to work in remote field areas

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Julianne O'Reilly-Wapstra for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

There is an opportunity for one PhD student to work on a project that is aimed at exploring the fundamentals of 3D printing glass and multi-level porosity structures. 3D printing of plastics and metals fails to realise low-cost, robust, transparent, and biocompatible devices. The advent of glass and ceramic 3D printing can overcome these limitations. Moreover, multi-level porosity structures are becoming vital to the advancement of various fields, such as energy, health, and environmental science.

The PhD project would include the development of a new multi-material SLA based 3D printer and exploring the analytical applications of the 3D printed hierarchically porous glass based microfluidic devices. The successful candidate will be provided with an incentivised stipend of 28,092 p.a (2020 rate, indexed annually).

This PhD project is only open for applicants who can commence on-shore.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Please provide a brief summary (maximum 800 words) describing your research and educational experience in the fields of mechatronics, material science, and/or analytical chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Scholarship Selection Criteria
  • Mechatronics
  • Materials Science
  • Analytical Chemistry
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Vipul Gupta for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Novel separation technologies and materials will be developed to contribute to filling the methodological gap for the measurement and understanding of the behaviour of nanoplastics in the environment.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Fernando Maya Alejandro for further information.

Closing Date

15th November 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

There is a growing concern on the presence of phytochemicals (naturally occurring chemicals in plants) in large or trace amounts in the food chain.  All phytochemicals are possibly toxic and the wrong dose of a phytochemical is a poison.  The relationship between a chemical's inherent toxicity and the population's exposure to that chemical is the basis for risk assessment of potentially unsafe phytochemicals.  Exposure assessment is needed in the risk assessment process and for deciding if a chemical poses an intolerable risk to public health.  It gives primary information for studies on the chronic effects of long-term exposure to chemicals.

The objective of this PhD project is to conduct food analysis as part of exposure assessment of (potentially) toxic phytochemicals.  
Chemical analysis will be used for the critical task of determining the concentration of the phytochemicals and their metabolites in food samples.  The main challenges during analysis are: no one method fits all, due to the chemical diversity of the phytochemicals; high complexity of the food matrices, which makes them difficult to analyse; most likely low concentrations of the targeted phytochemicals in the samples.

This PhD program will conduct innovations in analytical methodology development for food analysis, with emphasis on minimising the chemical waste generated from analysis.

Eligibility
  • Should be able to start December 2020 with proper visa

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Lito Quirino for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is focused on designing and engineering novel transition metal-based catalysts to establish unprecedented chemical reactions. The potential of these processes to establish new modes of small molecule activation and develop novel synthetic methodology will be explored. The results of this project may lead to the establishment of new strategies for the rapid and direct synthesis of important classes of organic molecules, including natural products and their derivatives.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Organic synthesis
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Transition metal catalysts are now used for the preparation of polymers, new medications and natural products synthesis. To facilitate the design of selective catalytic cycles and to improve the procedures, the mechanisms of the catalytic reactions need to be understood in detail.  The complexity of the mechanisms of these reactions means that experimental findings alone are not capable of fully elucidating mechanisms.

However, computational chemistry by invoking the experimental findings can provide a more complete insight into the mechanism of metal-catalysed reactions. For example, we recently reported that the reactivity of the gold complexes can be extended well beyond direct π-activation. We found that the gold complexes are indeed able to generate electrophiles that are more reactive toward π-activation than a gold complex itself (see: Catal. Sci. Technol., 2019, 9, 1420; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 14599; Chem. Commun. 2016, 52, 9422; Organometallics 2014, 33, 7318; ACS Catal 2014, 4 , 2896). This project is aimed at investigating the mechanisms of similar processes in which metals are used to serve as a source for generating strong electrophiles which are capable of catalysing reactions such as functionalization of Olefines.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alireza Ariafard for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The ability to rapidly detect bacteria/viruses is an important capability in the diagnosis of bacterial/virus infections and, if implemented when sample is collected, could lead to a signification reduction in unnecessary prescription of antibiotics.  this project will compliment our recent work on bacteria detection, to begin to explore ways to detect viruses for rapid on-site bacterial/viral infection diagnosis.

Eligibility
  • Experience with electrophoresis and/or microfluidics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Michael Breadmore for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project involves the screening of endemic Tasmanian plants to discover new and valuable compounds that can be used to lead drug discovery. By employing a practical pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) method developed in-house, a range of plants will be extensively screened to determine their chemical profiles. The identification of plants containing significant quantities of organic molecules that can facilitate semi-synthesis and/ or feature chemotaxonomic value will also be pursued.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Synthetic organic chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Structural characterisation techniques including NMR, IR and MSA

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

30th May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Application of nanomaterials (NPs) in SPME, in combination with 3DP technology for fabrication of integrated lab-on-chip (LOC) devices, are going to create a new revolution in chemical analysis. An important class of highly porous NPs is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which have attracted a lot of interest, due to their unique capabilities, like thermal stability, large surface area, and highly regular and permanent porosity.

This project aims to develop a microfluidic-based SPME chip, using MOF composites, for sample clean up. It will be directly couple with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for subsequent analysis. It will be very beneficial for proteomic analysis.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants with chemistry backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Analytical Chemistry, Nanochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alireza Ghiasvand for further information.

Closing Date

30th May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

SPME is a promising solvent-free sample preparation method that can merge extraction, preconcentration, and derivatization into a single step and therefore is suitable for monitoring PCFs. However, because of the complexity of the environmental samples, the SPME sorbent must be selective to compensate for the matrix effect.

Accordingly, this project aims to synthesize novel classes of micro-sorbents for selective and more efficient extraction of PFCAs and PFSAs in soil and water samples. They will be coated on fused-silica or metallic fibres and used for SPME applications for trapping of volatile or derivatized PCFs. To achieve reliable and feasible analytical strategies, optimization of the extraction process will be performed using multivariate statistical analysis and experimental designs, which are broadly employed to search and optimize the efficiency of affective variables to enhance performance and minimize the error of experiments in different research areas.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants with chemistry backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Analytical Chemistry, Nanochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alireza Ghiasvand for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the absence of a magnetic field, certain molecules can retain magnetisation; they exhibit a hysteresis (or a lagging) in the magnetisation below a certain temperature. The term Single Molecular Magnet (SMM) has been coined to describe such molecules. The origin of the magnetic hysteresis is not from long range magnetic ordering as seen in classical magnetic materials, rather is intrinsic to the molecular features of the molecules. The best lanthanide SMMs are usually based on monometallic complexes. However, radical bridges have been used to provide a very strong interaction between the unpaired electrons in the contracted 4f orbitals in dinuclear lanthanide complexes. This project involves the synthesis of new dinuclear complexes involving the verdazyl ligand.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rebecca Fuller for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Expedition SO255 dredged the seafloor of the Kermadec intra-oceanic arc and back-arc at multiple locations over >130,000 km2, retrieving pumice and volcanic ash from the shallow seafloor. This project will address dispersal and sediment transport processes from submarine and subaerial silicic volcanism at the scale of an arc. The PhD student will conduct LA-ICP-MS chemical fingerprinting of the volcanic glass and crystals collected during SO255, and compare this data with existing geochemical databases. The style of transport (aerial, as floatsam, or fully underwater) will be inferred using the clast's physical characteristics and the extent of their dispersal. Floatsam dispersion by surface ocean currents will be calculated using oceanic models.

This project has large implications on regional sediment provenance, but also on geochemistry and petrology of submarine arc volcanism in general. This project is partly linked to the 2012 deep submarine eruption of Havre, and is likely to be merged with future volcanology projects in the Kermadec arc, including participation to a voyage in 2020.

The student would be part of the dynamic Submarine Volcanism Group at the University of Tasmania, and would benefit from a large panel of experts in CODES and Earth Sciences in general.

Eligibility

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Earth Sciences
  • Geoscience
  • Marine Geoscience
  • Geochemistry
  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Authorship in a published peer-reviewed research paper
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Interest/experience in laboratory/research voyage
  • Ability to work as part of a research team / individually / as appropriate to project
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

31st December  2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Tailings produced from historical alluvial tin mining at the Endurance Mine site in north-eastern Tasmania are continuing to generate acid and metalliferous drainage, resulting in detrimental impacts to the nearby environment. This site has been identified as a priority for remediation by Mineral Resources Tasmania (MRT).

The large volume of tailings, high hydraulic conductivity, and geochemical heterogeneity of mine wastes at the Endurance site creates a challenge for identifying an effective remediation strategy. A common approach used to prevent metal(loid) leaching and acid generation is the application of a tailings cover to reduce oxygen diffusion and water infiltration. Choosing an appropriate cover material requires knowledge of tailings geochemistry and mineralogy, hydrogeology, climate, and the volume of tailings. Understanding how temporal wetting and drying cycles influence the effectiveness of different cover options will guide management decisions about long-term remediation and closure of the Endurance mine site and others in eastern Tasmania.

In collaboration with MRT, this project aims to generate new knowledge about the effectiveness of organic and inorganic covers at Endurance mine. Laboratory and field-based cover experiments, combined with numerical modelling, will aim to optimise tailings cover designs and improve long-term water quality at legacy mines in north-eastern Tasmania.

Eligibility
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Experience designing and conducting independent field-based projects is required
  • Experience working in a team-based environment is highly valued
  • Hands-on experience with laboratory analysis and/or numerical modelling is preferred

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in a relevant field, including geology, earth sciences, environmental sciences, environmental chemistry or a related subject

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Clare Miller or further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This research project will focus on the pyroclastic fall and density current deposits of the 1315 Kaharoa eruption of Tarawera Volcano in the Taupo Volcanic Zone New Zealand. This eruption had explosive phases that are an intriguing combination of features of high intensity Plinian and impulsive Vulcanian explosivity. This proposed study will combine microtextural, geochemical and modelling approaches in order to permit us to examine the factos that modulate 'open' vs. 'closed' system degassing in the conduits of silicic volcanoes.

The research will be focused on:

  1. Quantifying time-averaged intensity and steadiness within individual explosive phases and a comparison between phases;
  2. Inferring ascent and degassing histories from vesicle and microlite textures of pumices within phases, and contrasting them with the products of the Vulcanian phase, the associated lava domes, and existing work on the products of steady Plinian eruptions;
  3. Constraining initial pre-ascent conditions using data from melt inclusions;
  4. Measuring volatiles in order to constrain the timescales of vesicle growth (degassing)
Eligibility
  • Experience in volcanology
  • Experience in analysis of volcanic textures
  • Excellent written and oral presentation skills
  • Demonstrated ability to work individually on research projects

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Applicants from the following discipline is eligible to apply:

  • Earth Sciences
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Rebecca Carey for further information.

No results were found

Closing Date

14th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Matrix-analytic methods (MAMs) is an area of applied probability pioneered by Professor Marcel Neuts, who has transformed the theory with an idea that, rather than developing mathematical structures that have little use for practical applications, the focus should be on constructing models and methods of analysis that can be applied efficiently, using fast algorithms and computers. Since then, many useful models and algorithms, and numerous efficient methods for applications in a wide range of real-world problems  have been developed by researchers in this area.

In this project you will focus on novel stochastic models in order to capture more complex behaviours than it was possible before, and develop algorithms for efficient analysis of stochastic processes useful for practical applications. You will have an opportunity to engage in international collaborations with  prominent researchers in the area of matrix-analytic methods.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability
  • Knowledge and skills in coding

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly for further information.

Closing Date

14th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

An urgent need to improve hospital patient flow is a major challenge facing the managers of the healthcare systems. Critically, clinical evidence confirms that delays in treatment in hospitals lead to poorer patient outcomes and higher inpatient mortality. Poor patient flow directly contributes to: Emergency Department (ED) crowding, bed access-block, increased length of stay (LoS) and delayed discharge, and all pose risks to patient safety.

In this project you will focus on developing mathematical models and algorithms for a practical application in daily decision making in a random environment. You will engage with a multi-disciplinary team (Mathematics, Computing, Medicine, Department of Health) whose aim is to develop a suite of innovative models and a novel prototype tool for optimising patient flow.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly for further information.

Closing Date

15th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

One of the classical problems in Fluid Mechanics is the "Rayleigh Bubble", in which a gas bubble in a fluid grows or shrinks, depending on the pressure inside the bubble.  A key assumption in this classical problem is that the bubble remains Spherical at all times. This is a reasonable approximation for very small bubbles. However, large bubbles need not remain spherical, but instead, they can distort into complicated shapes.

This Project will consider several mathematical models of bubble growth or collapse, and will use a combination of linear stability analyses, weakly non-linear theories and fully numerical methods. The results are important in underwater explosions and astrophysics.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Theoretical Physics
  • Theoretical Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof. Larry Forbes for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Many galaxy properties, including mass, star formation history and morphology, are correlated with their environments. The properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) hosted by these galaxies are similarly sensitive to where the galaxy finds itself. For example, powerful radio AGN, produced by relativistic jet launching by a combination of spin and accretion onto a supermassive black hole, are found overwhelmingly in galaxy groups and clusters. Interpreting the observable properties of radio AGN is important for quantifying the amount of feedback these objects do on their host galaxies and beyond, yet this too depends on knowledge of the environment into which the jets are propagating.

GAMA Legacy ATCA Southern Survey (GLASS) is a 3000-hour Legacy survey on the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Australia's premier radio astronomy instrument. GLASS conducts sensitive observations of 50 square degrees of the sky at 5.5 and 9.5 GHz. A key feature of GLASS is availability of environment measures through deep optical group catalogues covering the survey field. The two main science goals are to measure the demographics of Active Galactic Nuclei and star forming galaxies in both the nearby and high-redshift Universe, as a function of environment.

This PhD project will focus on imaging GLASS data, and constructing catalogues of radio sources and their host galaxies across a wide range of radio, optical and infra-red wavelengths, for a complete census of AGN, star forming galaxies, and their environments. For an interested student, an AGN modeling component using the UTAS-developed RAiSE dynamical model is also a possibility. This project will be performed in collaboration with colleagues CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science.

Eligibility
  • Open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject
  • Familiarity with radio astronomy techniques and/or analytical modelling
  • Coding experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stas Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

It may seem odd to compare black holes to thermostats, yet mounting evidence suggests this is precisely their role in galactic ecosystems. The Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) phenomenon in galaxies is intermittent, but the drivers of both the triggering and cessation of black hole activity are not yet well constrained. One clue lies in the different environments inhabited by fast, powerful jets, and their slower, less powerful counterparts. These two types of jets also impart quite different types of feedback on the surrounding gas.

This project aims to quantify the amount of feedback different types of jets do on their surroundings, by leveraging state-of-the-art hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations describing the propagation of jets with different properties into a range of realistic environments, run on the National Computational Infrastructure Australia supercomputer Gadi. In each case, predictions will be made for the efficiency and long-term effects of jet feedback. Model predictions will be confronted with observational data from leading Australian and international projects, and compared with traditional prescriptions in existing galaxy formation models. This project will be performed in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Hertfordshire and the ASTRO-3D ARC Centre of Excellence in All-Sky Astrophysics.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Desirable skills: familiarity with numerical simulations, analytical modeling and/or radio astronomy techniques; coding experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stas Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Interstellar masers are often found in the environment of forming high-mass stars.  It has recently been discovered that some sources exhibit extraordinary flares in the maser emission, with rapid changes in intensity and in the maser transitions present within the regions.  The maser flares appear to be associated with episodic accretion bursts in the high-mass protostar and so provide a unique opportunity to study a rare and interesting phenomenon.

An international collaboration, known as M2O has been formed to share and coordinate the effort of detecting and following-up such flares. The candidate will help to develop the capability to use University of Tasmania facilities to monitor southern maser sources and undertake follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and local and international VLBI arrays.

Eligibility
  • Experience using radio telescopes and processing radio astronomy data

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Astrophysics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Simon Ellingsen for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies releases the most energetic outbursts in the Universe. Resultant jets of synchrotron-emitting plasma, visible to radio telescopes, burrow through the surrounding gas. This gas is the raw fuel from which stars are made, and by imparting some of their energy to it the black hole jets are known to regulate the star formation history of the most massive galaxies.

Much is unknown about the processes responsible for triggering and propagation of black hole jets. On the other hand, current and upcoming surveys with leading international telescopes (LOFAR, ATCA, ASKAP, MWA, JVLA, MeerKAT and eventually the SKA) will study these objects in unprecedented detail across a wide range of radio frequencies. The aim of this project is to construct an equally sophisticated theoretical framework to interpret these data.

This project will use data products from state-of-the-art astrophysical fluid dynamics simulations run on the NCI Australia Gadi supercomputer, and supplement these with the UTAS-developed Radio AGN in Semi-analytic Environments (RAiSE) model to predict detailed radio synchrotron emission signatures of these jets throughout their lifecycle. Comparison of models with data from close collaborators will constrain the mechanisms responsible for the onset and cessation of jet activity, and make predictions for future observations. This project will be performed in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Hertfordshire, International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), CSIRO and the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON).

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Desirable skills: familiarity with numerical simulations, analytical modelling and/or radio astronomy techniques; coding experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stas Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Krzysztof Bolejko, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Modern cosmology is based on the fact that the universe expands. The present rate of the expansion is measured in terms of the Hubble constant. One of the most intriguing problems of modern cosmology is discrepancy in the measurements of the Hubble Constant. The estimation of the Hubble constant based on observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is inconsistent with measurement of the Hubble constant based on supernovae observations. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation was emitted when the Universe was very young. On the other hand supernovae are located in nearby galaxies. Thus, possible explanation of the Hubble constant tension range from hypotheses concerning the early Universe or late stages of our Universe's evolution.

This PhD Project will focus on the problem of the Hubble constant tension. It will involve investigations of various scenarios either concerning the early universe, or intermediate universe, or its recent stage. The project is mostly theoretical and involves numerical modeling. However, it will also require the use of cosmological data.  

The candidate should have solid foundations in the theoretical cosmology as well as numerical skills. Statistical analysis and data handling skills are preferred but not essential.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.

Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply.

Please see the following web page for entry requirements: https://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

The following criteria will be used to competitively assess applicants for this project/scholarship:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject.
  • Familiarity with numerical and analytical modeling.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now webpage.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Krzysztof Bolejko for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Under contract with Geoscience Australia, UTAS operates a continental-wide network of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes. Our antennas in Katherine (NT), Yarragadee (WA) and Hobart (TAS) contribute to measuring global reference frames and Earth orientation such as polar motion and the rotational speed of the Earth.

The next generation VLBI Global Observing System (VGOS), comprising new broadband receivers is expected to improve the current measurement precision from the centimetre level to a few millimetres or better.

The main research goal is the improvement of the current precision of Australian VLBI sessions from about one centimetre to the millimetre level. While the successful candidate is expected to pursue her/his independent research, testing new modes, optimising the allocated frequency bands and developing new correlation and fringe-fitting procedures are possible areas of research.The successful candidate will support the implementation of the VGOS system for the AuScope VLBI antennas and conduct Australian VGOS observations.

This project includes a lot of technical work, hence the candidate should not be afraid of using new programs. The candidate will further have an opportunity to actively test the solutions they identify through taking an active role in supporting the AuScope operations.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a Masters degree or First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • A good level of spoken and written English is necessary for this project

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Education in geodesy and spatial sciences - familiarity with space geodetic techniques is welcome
  • Education in Physics or Astronomy
  • Experience with Linux and software development
  • Signal processing

More information

Please contact Dr Lucia McCallum for more information.

Closing Date

27th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The project aims to explore a unique niche in exoplanet detection: searches for cold planets down to Earth mass, including ice giants and rogue free-floating planets. These are significant because they are completely different from most known exoplanets, being far from their host stars and unique probes of planet formation theory. They may include Earth-mass planets around the most common type of star in the galaxy, red dwarfs. Discovering these planets and learning whether their frequency varies with location in the Galaxy can only be done with gravitational microlensing experiments.

This project involves collaboration with a large international research group using telescopes in Tasmania, North and South America, and in space. The duties of the PhD candidate will involve observing and measuring candidate planetary events from the University of Tasmania 1.27 and 0.5 metre telescopes and modeling the time series photometric light curves of the events in order to determine their planetary nature. Depending on the details of the systems discovered, this may involve additional visible and infrared wavelength data from a variety of telescopes. Planetary system parameters will be determined by applying Bayesian models in a variety of computing environments.

Eligibility
  • Applicant to be assessed according to the same criteria used for any other scholarship ranking round, according to performance in the BSc/Hons/MSc degrees & referees

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Astronomy, physics, or a closely-related subject

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andrew Cole for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced dramatic surface loading changes since the 1990s, when a series of ice shelves broke up resulting in the acceleration of their in-feeding glaciers. There is great interest in using this natural experiment in unloading the Earth to understand the viscoelastic properties of the Earth in this region.

This study will make use of new seismic and geodetic datasets from the Antarctic Peninsula to construct new models of the viscoelastic structure of this region. Further seismic and geodetic datasets are available from East Antarctica, which is less active in terms of ice unloading, but is considered 'The Sleeping Giant' in terms of its potential to contribute many metres of sea-level rise within very few generations.

Quantifying the uncertainties in viscoelastic properties, the uncertainties in the 3D architecture of the deep lithosphere and asthenosphere, and their impact on glacial isostatic modelling will be a key component of the research.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Mathematical geophysics
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Geodesy and spatial sciences
  • Scientific computation

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Anya Reading for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Associate Professor David Beynon invites expressions of interest from those thinking of undertaking a PhD into the cultural, historical and compositional dimensions of architecture.

Dave’s research involves investigating, and adaptations of architectural content and meaning in relation to urban renewal, migration, and multicultural/intercultural aspects of architecture and built environments.  Areas of possible thesis investigation within the project include:

  • Architecture, migration and changing built environments
  • Alternative Architectural Histories, particularly in relation to notions of modernity and postcoloniality
  • Inter-Regional Architectural Futures: Analysing parallels between Tasmania and other Asia-Pacific locations
  • Digital Heritage: Developing modelling and visualisation technologies for interpreting and visualising ancient and historic architectures
  • Ex-Industrial Built Environments: Developing the cultural and practical re-purposing for a post-industrial future.

Explorations may employ historiographic, discursive or creative methods. Depending on your individual research topic, potential co-supervisors may include: Dr Georgia Lindsay; Dr Helen Norrie; Dr Mark Sawyer; Dr Louise Wallis; Professor Julian Worrall

If your topic brings a specific interdisciplinary focus to the above area, co-supervision might also include academics from Geography and Spatial Science, Information and Communication Technology or Arts and Social Sciences.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

While candidates from other disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in architecture, urban design, urban planning or related social sciences. Depending on which area of investigation you are focusing on, background in cultural studies, digital modelling, archaeology or particular regional studies may be advantageous
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, David Beynon for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The University of Tasmania is undertaking a development project, shifting towards engaging closely with central business districts and connecting more closely with communities. According to the website, the new campuses built under the Northern Transformation Project (NTP) “will become central to the life of each city and region – vibrant places where the community, business and industry, and the University can connect and collaborate.”

This project will use the NTP as the topic and site of research. Students could propose projects to work with a variety of Architecture and Design staff, including:

  • Work with Dr. Georgia Lindsay on understanding the social outcomes of the building project. Georgia’s research focuses on how institutions use buildings to create identity and branding, to connect with community, and to educate. She welcomes project proposals in that realm.
  • Work with Dr. Mark Sawyer to articulate how the NTP has developed through various forms of ‘media-construction’ in the public realm, even before any building has begun. Mark’s research considers how the development of buildings and cities is understood by representations in the media. He welcomes proposals addressing this area of interest.
  • Work with Dr. David Beynon on exploring the cultural implications of transforming built environments, focusing on post-industrial landscapes as foundations for redefining the futures of regional cities, and the roles of art, architecture and communities in the transformation process.
Eligibility
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Ability to create a compelling proposal and expression of interest
  • Background in social science, media studies, or design fields
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Georgia Lindsay for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Green building certification systems, such as LEED for Schools and the Living Building Challenge, encourage design teams to use green buildings as educational "teaching tools." However, we have much yet to learn about the social performance of green buildings and how to engage occupants in the sustainability narrative of buildings. This project seeks to remedy that gap through understanding the mediated meanings of sustainable building features. 

Dr. Georgia Lindsay has been studying the problem using green museums in the US. Increasingly, museums are using green-building construction practices for new buildings, and some go so far as to consider the surrounding landscape as part of the museum's "collection" to be preserved. Moreover, with the growth of the Green Economy, sustainability has a cache among institutions and businesses seeking to build green branding. Science museums, especially those with green buildings, are uniquely positioned to advance architectural literacy while communicating the values of earth stewardship to the general public.

Georgia invites expressions of interest from those interested in pursuing research about how architecture communicates sustainability. Topics might include green museums in a global or Australian context, sustainability communication in building types other than museums, and how to invest architecture with legible pedagogical content. Please note, while this project has aspects that strongly align with the technical side of building science, projects should propose move beyond the merely technical to engage in some way with the social or communicative aspects of green buildings.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Ability to create a compelling proposal and expression of interest
  • Background in social science or design fields
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Georgia Lindsay for further information.

Closing Date

31st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Associate Professor Ceridwen Owen is seeking expressions of interest from prospective HDR students interested in the complex relationships between the design of the environment and health and wellbeing. The shift from pathogenic (factors causing disease) to salutogenic (factors supporting health) approaches in healthcare has seen an increased emphasis on and understanding of the role of design in promoting health and wellbeing. Projects can explore psychological as well as bio-physical health outcomes across a diversity of contexts and scales encompassing cities, buildings, spaces and objects.

Potential topics include:

  • Critical and conceptual interpretations of therapeutic landscapes as they relate both to healthcare settings, urban environments and/or public institutions
  • The intersection between design and health in acute care settings
  • Design for cognitive and sensory diversity
  • Neuroscience and design

Explorations may employ a range of qualitative research methods. Of particular interest are projects that integrate visual-based, creative and participatory design approaches.

Candidates will typically be supervised by colleagues across multi-disciplinary teams relevant to the specific project including Geography, Health Science, Medicine and Nursing.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree, Research Masters or Masters by Coursework with a substantive research component or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications and/or creative works
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, critical thinking and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Ceridwen Owen for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Bamboo has been utilised as a construction material for thousands of years and has a strong connection to local craft in various cultures around the world. Whilst there is a strong intrinsic knowledge of bamboo within these societies, it is only within the last 50 years that designers and academics have begun to thoroughly research the capacity of bamboo to be utilised a contemporary building material. This has process has led to seminal projects that have structurally pushed bamboo beyond what it was traditionally capable of through the development of new methods of connection and treatment.

However bamboo faces a number of challenges when utilised as a round pole. The proposed PHD would look to investigate how bamboo has been traditionally utilised in construction and how the lamination of bamboo strips into engineered bamboo products offers an opportunity for bamboo to become a standardised product that can be utilised in mainstream construction. The project would focus upon a proposed case study of utilising laminate bamboo elements to prefabricate housing stock whilst also documenting the process of manufacturing this product from harvest to construction.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

While candidates from other disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in architecture, engineering and/or specialist knowledge of bamboo and/or construction systems
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Helen Norrie for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Dr. Georgia Lindsay invites expressions of interest from those interested in undertaking a PhD. Broadly speaking, Georgia's research emphasizes the human side of design, including pre-occupancy analysis and programming, use and behaviour-focused post-occupancy evaluation, and studying the meaning and effects of architecture. More specifically, her work focuses on museum buildings, and how architecture is used by institutions and cities to communicate values and brand places. 

Working with Georgia will allow you to define and develop your own area of focus. Some general areas might include:

  • Making meaning within constructed ecologies – projects that help frame and analyse how sustainable building features   are used and understood
  • Understanding and responding to participatory practices in design  – studies relating to stakeholder and community needs, including addressing mixed methods for both engagement and data collection practices
  • Branding and communication – projects investigating the social uses  and meanings inherent in architecture and design at a variety of levels of analysis

Students work with supervisory teams of at least two, and other supervisors might include David Beynon, Julian Worrell, or Ceridwen Owen.

Eligibility
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Ability to create a compelling proposal and expression of interest
  • Background in social science or design fields
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Georgia Lindsay for further information.

Closing Date

27th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Geoheritage refers to geological features of outstanding scientific, educational, cultural, or aesthetic value. Geoheritage has gained increasing recognition over the past three decades as globally important, due to the ongoing loss of sites or damage to sites as a result of human activity (e.g., mining, land clearing, vandalism). 'Informal' geoheritage sites may still be worthy of conservation due to the scientific values of their elements, and the important additional values associated with education and tourism. While frameworks have been put in place to protect formal geoheritage sites, other sites which may be of high value remain unprotected and at risk, especially in Australia, where only superlative examples of 'outstanding universal value' are protected under federal legislation.

This PhD project will assess the potential of using land use planning provisions and measures (e.g. zoning, overlays, incorporation in regional planning instruments) to protect informal geoheritage. The successful scholarship recipient will employ a range of potential methods, including stakeholder engagement, spatial analysis (GIS), a Delphi study with land use planning experts and/or interviews and focus groups to assess efficacy of using planning systems to protect and manage informal geoheritage. The study will take place in Tasmania, an island state with outstanding geoheritage.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Degree-level major, Honours or Masters in geography, geology, planning, sociology or a related discipline
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills

Desirable Skills:

  • Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS, remote sensing)
  • Statistical analysis skills
  • Social science or communications related training

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Melinda McHenry for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Social connectedness, support, and safe, local places in which to meet, nurture, and maintain those connections make important contributions to individual, family, and community health, resilience, and wellbeing. On that basis, governments at all levels, and private and community and health services have designed and funded programs and safe spaces to help create and practically support belonging and connectedness, and foster community wellbeing.

Their services often target specific cohorts to support those in certain age, socioeconomic, or diversity groups in particular communities and localities. However, communities also have informal groups and relationships, support networks, and carved-out safe places that embody aspects of connection, belonging, identity, and emotional and practical nurturing and support that these more formal structures seek to create and emulate. Such networks may not be discreet and specifically targeted and nor are they necessarily funded or structured. Rather, they emerge from and form part of the everyday life of community and place and, as such, stretch and flex across time, space, and life-courses.

The aim of this study is to identify such a network and, using qualitative and interpretive methods, to interview participants in that network and analyse the complex interplay of community, place, and context; gain an understanding of the attributes, dynamics, and geographies of such informal and taken-for-granted place based connections that support individual and community resilience and flourishing; and consider how these change over time and space. The outcome will be an enhanced understanding of the complexity and multifaceted nature of such networks, including potentially transferable lessons in how to enhance more formally conceived and created place and community-based programs.

Eligibility
  • First class or upper second honours
  • Publications or evidence of submitted manuscripts
  • Background in social research
  • Competency in use of qualitative data analysis tools
  • Evidence of capacity to manage projects on time and budget

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Human geography

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Elaine Stratford for further information.

Closing Date

5th March 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

UNESCO Global (and also national) Geoparks have been established to recognise the outstanding universal values associated with abiotic landscapes and landform elements. Geoparks also encourage geotourism that empowers local communities, through maintenance and protection of cultural practices and via the economic value of geotourism. Most of the worlds Geoparks are in Europe and China, with the position of other nations ranging from wholly unaware of the geoparks concept, through to those like Australia, who have had a range of unsuccessful geoparks bids. Additionally, the lack of awareness of digital tools that have recently emerged to support Geopark design, decision-making and (once established) communication and education also makes it more difficult for interested nations and regions to develop coherent plans for successful Geoparks.

In this project, as the successful applicant you will employ mixed-methods to explore the potential causal mechanisms for the relative 'success' of geoparks in both the planning and implementation stage. By way of focus groups and workshops with key stakeholders, and through the employ of developed Geographic Information Technology (GIT) tools, you will explore opportunities for innovation and stakeholder education and empowerment in the assessment, inventory, design and decision-making processes that proceed Geoparks nomination.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geography, geology, planning, sociology or a related discipline
  • Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS, remote sensing)
  • Evidence of cross-cultural competence, or the ability to work in diverse teams
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills

Desirable Skills:

  • Statistical and Qualitative analysis skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Melinda McHenry for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctica continues to deform as a result of past and present surface loading changes, especially ice loading changes, and Earthquake-related effects. Over the last 10 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been increasingly deployed in Antarctica to measure surface deformation. These data are now yielding sufficiently precise surface velocity time series to be able to separate competing models and in doing so learn new things about the interior of the Earth and the past ice loading history.

This project will focus on the analysis of GPS data with state-of-the-art techniques in order to better understand the deformation of Antarctica. It will apply novel techniques to remove time series noise and compare these to numerical models developed from existing codes and from outputs provided by third parties. These results will be important for understanding present-day ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise and in gaining fundamental understanding into the interior of the Earth. The project will provide students with advanced skills in numerical analysis, interpretation and presentation.

Eligibility
  • 1st class Honours degree, or overseas equivalent, in a relevant field
  • Nationals of Crimea Region of Ukraine, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria are unfortunately unable to apply due to software restrictions
  • Applications are invited from qualified individuals from all other nations, including Australia

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Quantitative Earth Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Geodesy
  • Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • A track record of publication of research results in international journals
  • Proven ability to work within a team as well as independently
  • Experience of geodetic GNSS software (desirable)
  • Willingness to learn new skills and competencies
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Australians have called for changes to laws to address increased use of new technologies such as e-scooters and have been concerned mainly with safety and the different rates at which things move on road infrastructure often not designed for mixed uses. The current debate is based on outdated assumptions about transport, transport technology, and road users, and it is time to rethink certain assumptions underpinning both the Australian Road Rules and urban planning and design practices.

At present, for example, it is difficult to account for new forms of transport like e-scooters let alone other transport technologies that might next morph from devices such as skateboards, hoverboards, or segues. A more creative approach may be to consider a larger question: can we transform how we move and connect to foster transport that is more equitable, more sustainable, and safer for all road users by rewriting the rules and retrofitting roads? Given the benefits of play across all ages, in the process can we make our settlements more playful for residents and visitors?

This project would be a national comparative study examining those questions using mixed methods and working to influence policy and practice as well as international scholarship and debates.

Eligibility
  • Applicant should have a background in social and/or spatial sciences, including geography, planning, urban design, public policy, and the capacity to undertake both basic quantitative and more advanced forms of qualitative research

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Elaine Stratford for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The aim of this research is to address the question how are island academics, activists, and artists engaging in projects in which islands are reconfigured in the Anthropocene and in ways that may also serve decolonizing agendas, many of them being forged in response to climate change.

The study will involve an in-depth international analysis of public outputs by island academics, activists, and artists that include formal and informal texts, artworks, speeches, performances, and other cultural expressions available online and that manifest expressions of islandness in the Anthropocene. It will also involve speaking online to a selection of such individuals – case study participants – to gauge whether and how those outputs are also motivated by decolonizing projects.

The main outcome of the research will be enhanced understandings of the dynamics that link islanders' creative works on pressing challenges posed by both the Anthropocene and the structural violence of colonialism and climate change.

Eligibility
  • The candidate will have a background in social sciences and/or the humanities, and a strong interest in developing the capacity to learn skills in discourse analysis, qualitative research, research across diverse populations, and an interest in theory-driven research

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Elaine Stratford for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Across Australia, kitchen-garden programs have become entrenched in many schools, and early evidence suggests that they have significant efficacy. This project would seek to build on the emergent research being done to evaluate such programs, and would focus specifically on their geographical inflections and on the range of geographical insights that can be derived from them.

The research would involve consideration of the discourses of kitchen-garden programs and their geographical spread and reach, and the relationship of these to school's socio-economic and socio-demographic contexts. It would include case studies of different programs and/or different schools and their communities, and would examine the cultural, social, and educational geographies that both shape and are shaped by those programs or site-specific contexts.

The work would be evaluative in character, and could also consider the potential such programs have to help foster sustainable communities.

Eligibility
  • The candidate will have a background in social sciences and/or at the interface of the social sciences and education, and may have additional skills and qualifications in areas related to community development or gardens and gardening

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Elaine Stratford for further information.

Closing Date

18th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The concept of place attachment describes how strongly people connect to place to distinguish between the physical resources provided by place (dependence) and the emotional and symbolic relationships people form with place (identity). Over the past decade, the measurement and mapping of the core dimensions of place attachment has been initiated through the concept of landscape values, thereby operationalising the place concept for land-use planning at multiple spatial scales. The mapping of landscape values has emerged as a key research method for identifying important areas for conservation and sustainable development but has yet to be explored in the context of places at risk of loss from climate change.

The impacts of climate are inherently spatial and the effects will be felt heterogeneously across a population both due to the spatial location of impacts and the socio-demographics of the population. This PhD project will examine concept of ‘place’ and what types of responses of loss may be felt by the community as places are impacted. This may include approaches such as mapping landscape values with public participatory GIS (PPGIS), qualitative interviews to understand why particular places are significant, surveys or interviews to explore what experiences of loss the population has experienced as places have been impacted historically, and spatial mapping of how predicted impacts of climate change overlap with landscape values.

Supervisory team will include co-supervisors Dr Rebecca Harris, Distinguished Professor Jamie Kirkpatrick, Professor Elizabeth Lester

Eligibility
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in conservation, ecology, economics, geography, spatial sciences or a related subject
  • Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS, remote sensing) (desirable)
  • Statistical analysis skills (desirable)
  • Social science or communications related training (desirable)
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer-reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Vanessa Adams for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Moving from planning to implementation involves a process that embeds stakeholders and multiple objectives into the goals through to the products. This project will explore advances in multi-objective spatial planning in marine environments.  Possible, often competing, objectives to consider will include biodiversity protection, fisheries, seabed exploration and mining, and aquaculture.  Marine environments are rapidly changing under global climate change. Climate change will be a lens through which this project may consider how to plan for today as well as into the future.  Possible case study regions include Tasmania and Antarctica.

Eligibility
  • Quantitative modelling and statistical skills
  • Spatial analysis skills and familiarity with ArcGIS
  • Domestic candidates located in Tasmania are preferred but others will be considered

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Vanessa Adams for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

It is now clearly observed that the Antarctic Ice Sheet is losing more mass into the oceans than is being replaced by snowfall. The current rate of imbalance is about 200 billion tonnes-per-year, enough to raise sea levels by 0.6mm/yr (about a 1/6th of the current sea level rate) but expected to grow over the coming decades as the climate warms.

While quantification of this term has been the subject of an extensive research efforts, the uncertainty in these estimates is not well studied at all and certainly not given equal treatment. Initial studies that have examined some of the fundamental datasets suggest that uncertainties could be under-estimated by up to a factor of 10 when the observation noise is robustly treated.

This PhD will focus on considering appropriate noise models for the major techniques used to determine ice sheet mass change - altimetry, gravimetry and input-minus-output methods. It will consider the sensitivity of the estimates of change to different parameterisations of the change while, at the same time, considering a range of noise models. Change will be examined from the scale of the whole ice sheet down to individual drainage basins.

The PhD will contribute to a more robust understanding of the significance of observed changes and its possible acceleration in the coming years.

Eligibility
  • A Bachelor Honours degree, or equivalent, of at least second class upper standard with a Minimum Research Component in a quantitative subject, such as mathematics, physics, engineering, geodesy, or quantitative Earth sciences

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, Geodesy, or Quantitative Earth Sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

27th November 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In 2019, global emissions continued to rise as most governments failed to adequately move toward internationally agreed upon targets to avert catastrophic climate breakdown. Even with the sharp decline in transport activity and consumption due to worldwide COVID19 responses, post-pandemic economic stimulus packages add to the uncertainty of whether countries will meet their targets in time.

In Australia, the issue of climate policy has been highly politicised resulting in inadequate federal government action and years of political discord. Lobbyists with vested interests in maintaining a high carbon emitting economy have stymied debate whilst promoting climate denialism. This has contributed significantly to a lack of adequate communication of the climate and ecological crisis to the broader public - arguably a responsibility of both the government and media outlets. For example, the few high-quality news articles tend to be found in opinion columns hidden away from the front page.

Within this context, global social movements are emerging to put pressure on governments to act urgently. These movements are also playing an increasingly important role in meaningfully engaging the broader public through protest and campaigns that communicate the crisis in accessible, creative, and powerful ways.

This project aims to investigate the role of protest and social movements in communicating the climate crisis and stimulating action.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Rebecca Harris for further information.

Closing Date

28th October 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The CSIRO Perennial Prosperity project is exploring the contribution that tree plantings can make to farming enterprises in terms of financial and environmental benefits. It will examine how these benefits can be captured and integrated into farm accounts so that the full value of trees on farms can be recognised – instead of seeing trees as an investment with a long term return, the project will demonstrate to farmers that trees can return benefits to the farm enterprise almost from day 1.

Of particular interest are projects that explore the social and environmental questions of the impacts of tree plantings on ecosystem services (such as biodiversity, carbon, agricultural production, apiary and amenity). For example: nature-based solutions to climate change – can tree planting on farms build resilience to climate change? How are trees perceived in terms of risks and benefits? What implications are there for local communities, local environments and for scaling up?

The student will join an established, large project team working across organisations including CSIRO, UTAS, Private Forests for Tasmania and Greening Australia.

Eligibility
  • Excellent communication skills (written and orally)
  • Ability and interest in conducting multidisciplinary research with a range of stakeholders

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rebecca Harris for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Facial Emotion Recognition is the process of identifying human emotion, most typically from human facial expressions. AI-based facial emotion detection can be applied in a variety of fields such as Driver Fatigue Monitoring, Marketing, and Entertainment. Driver Fatigue Monitoring employs facial emotion detection to determine whether a driver is in a state of fatigue so as to appropriately intervene in the behaviour of the driver to avoid possible accidents. Advertisers and market researchers try to use consumer emotional engagement with digital content, such as videos and ads, to create the best ads and optimizing media spend.

The popularity of deep learning approaches in the domain of emotion recognition may be mainly attributed to its success in related AI applications such as Computer Vision. Well-known deep learning algorithms include different architectures of Deep Neural Network (DNN) such as Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). Deep Neural Networks have increasingly been employed to learn discriminative representations for automatic facial emotion recognition with some success, however, certain significant issues remain unresolved. Such issues include: Occlusion-robust and pose-invariant issues; Dataset bias and imbalanced distribution; Optimal DNN parameter set; Multimodal effect. In this project, you will develop new deep learning algorithms to overcome these and possibly other issues for faster, more reliable, and more accurate facial emotion detection.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Shuxiang Xu for further information.

Closing Date

10th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Machine learning approaches have been used for developing predictive models such as recommender systems, which seek to predict the preference that a user would give to an item. In recent years a new algorithm named Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) has been developed for training Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). With ELM, there are no iterations for adjusting connection weights and parameters tuning as in back propagation based ANNs.

While ELM has demonstrated superior performance in developing smaller recommender systems, one drawback of it is that, given an application with a big dataset, the number of neurons in its single hidden layer are typically very large and hence training the network can be computationally impractical. The ELM algorithm’s complexity is at least O(KM2), where K is the number of training instances and M is the number of hidden units. ELM also makes use of batch training, which leads to large memory consumption.

The project aims to evaluate several different solutions (such as representation learning and Deep ELMs) for these problems, and propose a new algorithm for maintaining the strengths of ELM but overcoming its weaknesses in performance and efficiency. Such a solution would be very valuable for developing more effective recommender systems in the current big data era.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Machine learning algorithms
  • Data mining and data analytics

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

31st October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Sentiment analysis (also known as opinion mining) refers to the use of natural language processing and text analysis to identify and extract subjective information in source materials. Sentiment analysis is widely applied to reviews and social media for a variety of applications, ranging from marketing to customer service. Sentiment analysis aims to determine the attitude of a speaker or a writer with respect to some topic or the overall contextual polarity of a document. The attitude may be his or her judgment or evaluation, affective state (the emotional state of the author when writing), or the intended emotional communication (the emotional effect the author wishes to have on the reader).

The rise of social media such as blogs and social networks has fuelled interest in sentiment analysis. With the proliferation of reviews, ratings, recommendations and other forms of online expression, online opinion has turned into a kind of virtual currency for businesses looking to market their products, identify new opportunities and manage their reputations. Companies look to automate the process of filtering out the noise, understanding the conversations, identifying the relevant content, and actioning it appropriately. This project aims at employing Machine Learning algorithms to automatically detect sentiment in user reviews of interested online business websites.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement
  • Candidates must demonstrate experience and strong interest in Machine Learning or general computational intelligence

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

30th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

As learner interaction in an online educational environment leaves a lot of digital traces behind, vast data sets of students’ online activities are available, which is known as Big data. Data and analytics in education, teaching and learning has attained great interest, resulting high-quality research into models, methods, technologies, and impact of analytics in education area. Big data and learning analytics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) is greatly extending the power of computers to revolutionise education sector. Educational data mining techniques discover meaningful patterns in these large datasets to create probabilistic and predictive models such as student success algorithms, understand and optimise learning and the environment. Learning analytics and AI are not panaceas for addressing all the issues and decisions faced by higher education but become part of the solution to enhance and transforms the way to support learning process.

The aim of the project is to investigate the deployment of AI techniques and analytical model/algorithm for improving learning analytics and for discovering the meaningful patterns in the large datasets of students to improve educational processes.

Eligibility
  • Experience with programming
  • Critical thinking

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

16th November 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Knowledge of the hydraulic properties of a soil is important for modelling soil moisture and for informing simulations to assist decision making in agriculture.  Determination of these parameters typically requires extensive and expensive field or laboratory investigations.

The purpose of this research is to explore the potential to determine hydraulic parameters using data from in situ soil moisture probes. The approach being investigated uses in situ moisture readings to provide feedback to a soil moisture model being run in parallel, in a technique known as Data Assimilation.  This will require application of data cleaning procedures, evaluation and execution of a range of data assimilation procedures including Ensemble Kalman & Particle filter, use of pedotransfer functions, development of field based data training routines, as well as some laboratory analysis of soil properties.

In addition to data assimilation, this research will attempt to leverage a range of machine learning and time series analysis techniques to address algorithm limitations when applied to real-world soils, especially those associated with wetting and drying hysteresis or complex soil profiles.

Eligibility
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or suitable industry experience, or Masters of research degree with a minimum research component
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds including ICT, mathematics, engineering and physics are encouraged to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Marcus Hardie for further information.

Closing Date

29th January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Haptic technology is also widely used in education to enhance student's learning experiences with anatomy as it allows physical interaction with anatomical structures  (Kup-Sze, Hanqiu & Pheng-Ann 2003; Reid, Shapiro & Louw 2018; Yeom et al. 2013). It is evident that AR and haptic technologies encourage student learning of anatomy through exposure of the body visually by 3-D modelling, and physically with tactile feedback. There is a huge educational potential to apply AR and haptics in education of anatomy. However, it has not yet been widely researched or evaluated.

The purpose of the proposed research is to investigate the use of interactive 3D anatomical simulation, used in conjunction with haptic feedback, to determine if it improves students' learning. The research will compare the effectiveness of the combination of AR and Haptic technology to their use independently, as well as comparing it to existing learning methods, such as 2D images and interactive resources (CD/DVD).

The research will be undertaken into four stages:

  • Generation of interactive 3D anatomical models in a mobile device;
  • Applying haptic feedback when a user touches/interacts with the 3D models;
  • Integrating the simulation of AR with haptic feedback);
  • Comparison and Evaluation of effectiveness of AR/haptic education in anatomy against existing methods.
Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

2nd April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Studies suggest the potential impact of blockchain in supply chains will be very significant and will contribute to improving the relationships between stakeholders through establishment of a safe, transparent and reliable "frictionless" method to exchange information and financial transactions. However, it is unclear to what extent these types of platforms are being used  in sustainable agribusiness, or to what extent they impose different challenges and risks especially on small and medium sized businesses who have limited supply chain power. Clearly facilitating any new technology to support sustainable production and consumption patterns and to reduce cost, risk and waste while increasing the product quality and market flexibility is positive – but is this happening and if not, why not?

This project investigates the potential designs and implementations of blockchains and investigates to what extent they are being deployed and to what effect. How is this technology impacting on track all used materials, including the dimensions of quality, quantity and ownership, over the whole supply chain in real-time?

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The PhD will preferably be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Paul Turner for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Knowledge graphs (KGs) are large networks of entities and their semantic relationships.  It has been widely applied in multiple areas, including information retrieval, situation awareness and recommender systems. A KG can be represented as a set of triples (h, t ,r) in which h (head) and t (tail) are entities (nodes), and r (relation) is  the relation (edge) between the two entities. KG embedding is to represent the entities and relations in a continuous vector space. This is a critical process to make KG semantic meaningful and machine understandable, and normally achieved by using machine learning methods. Negative sample generation is an important process for KG embedding. It provides sufficient training samples for the KG embedding, and fill the vector to a continuous space.

KG was first designed to formalize unstructured natural language data. With the development of KG techniques, researchers are now exploring the use of KG in other domains, especially IoT, Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Cybersecurity. However, traditional KG mining and KG embedding methods have been mainly focused on NLP data, and are not suitable for the latest applications. This project will investigate the limitations of existing KG embedding and mining methods, and design novel algorithms that can mine KG data more effectively and handle the dynamics from complex application domains.

  1. Yongqi Zhang, Quanming Yao, Yingxia Shao and Lei Chen, NSCaching: Simple and Efficient Negative Sampling for Knowledge Graph Embedding, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1812.06410.pdf
  2. Yantao  Jia, Yuanzhuo  Wang, Xiaolong  Jin, Hailun  Lin, Xueqi  Cheng , Knowledge Graph Embedding: A Locally and Temporally Adaptive Translation-Based Approach, ACM Transactions on the Web (TWEB), 2017
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer science
  • ICT
  • Mathematical sciences
  • Electrical engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Given the important challenges associated with the processing of brain signals obtained from neuroimaging modalities, fuzzy sets, neural networks and evolutional systems have been proposed as a useful and effective framework for the modelling and understanding of brain activity patterns as well as to enable a direct communication pathway between the brain and external devices (brain computer/machine interfaces). However, most of the research so far has focused on lab-based applications in constrained scenarios, which cannot be extrapolated to realistic field contexts. Considering the decoding of brain activity, the computational Intelligence models, including fuzzy sets, neural networks, and evolutional computation, provide an excellent tool to overcome the challenge of learning from brain activity patterns that are very likely to be affected by non-stationary behaviours and high uncertainty. The application of computational Intelligence methods to learning and modeling​ has recently demonstrated its remarkable usefulness for coping with the effects of extremely noisy environments, as well as the variability and dynamicity of brain signals. Additionally, neurobiological studies have suggested that the behaviour of neural cells exhibits functional patterns that resemble the properties of intelligent computation to encode logical perception. This paves the way for developing new computational intelligence techniques based on intelligence abstractions that foster the capabilities for modeling and understanding brain function from a quantitative point of view.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a {Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research} degree.

The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Selection Criteria

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Foundational programming skills
  • Statistics

More Information

Please contact Zehong Cao for more information.

Closing Date

1st October 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Trust is a term used in many fields, including computer science, and has many different meanings [1] [2]. In this project, trust is used to generate some expectation of success in a collaboration between two separate entities/agents. Most of trust models assume single and homogeneous trust relationship between agents [3}. However, most of these models cannot handle dynamic environments.

Contextual information plays important roles in trust evaluation. Especially as ground truth is not available in many complex environments, trust is closely related with contextual factors including social relationships among entities, spatial temporal information, features and types of services, etc. To overcome some limitations in existing trust mining approaches, in the research we will investigate how to utilize contextual information in trust mining and develop a robust mechanism which can allow more accurate and reasonable trust evaluations.

In this project, the student will propose a context-aware trust model, which can take contextual information into trust analysis. The proposed model will be applied in open dynamic environments, and to improve collaborations among agents with different capabilities and skills, i.e., heterogeneous. Simulation-based experiments will be conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed model.

References:

  1. Marsh, S.P., Formalising trust as a computational concept. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Stirling, Apr. 1994.
  2. Sabater, J. and C. Sierra, REGRET: reputation in gregarious societies, in Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Autonomous agents. 2001, ACM: Montreal, Quebec, Canada. p. 194-195.
  3. Tang, J., H. Gao, and H. Liu, mTrust: discerning multi-faceted trust in a connected world, in Proceedings of the fifth ACM international conference on Web search and data mining. 2012, ACM: Seattle, Washington, USA. p. 93-102.
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Information and Computing Technologies

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Blockchain is a technology to store data securely and transparently using distributed and crypto techniques. It is a data storage of the future with security, immutability, and transparency built-in. With such an evolutionary feature set, blockchain has currently gained traction in its adoption ratio. However, the required momentum to take this technology to the future is still lagging due to the core limitation of its inability to interoperate between heterogeneous and multiple chains.

Considering this an opportunity, in this project, we will research to find the resolution to the blockchain interoperability challenge that enables arbitrary data sharing among heterogeneous and multiple blockchain networks.

The current block in the chain is highly specialized and designed to handle transaction-oriented records; consequently, limiting the possibility of flexibility and extensibility required to achieve an interoperable distributed data structure. Therefore, for general-purpose storage and sharing of arbitrary data, the block structure needs to be generalized with schema-based definitions to allow global data interpretation. Therefore, in this project, we will research on devising a markup-like meta-structure definition scheme to represent a generic data block structure within a blockchain network. Furthermore, a possible markup-translation algorithm that can facilitate arbitrary data exchange among multiple and heterogeneous blockchains.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

2nd April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In Australia, 320,000 tonnes of plastics waste were recycled in 2018 of which 46% were reprocessed in Australia and the rest exported. Options for continuing to export plastic waste are narrowing and consumers are increasingly demanding better management of plastic production, use, recycling and re-use to protect the environment and reduce pollution and carbon emissions. Reengineering supply chains is an integral part of improving plastic recycling in a circular economy but requires enhanced use of digital systems and use of geo-spatial data capture and data-mining tools and techniques. To-date limited studies provide evidence on the optimal way to re-design plastics supply chains or how best to mine aggregated geo-spatial data to reduce emissions and optimise re-cycling and re-use. Post-consumer plastic waste can be recycled up to six times, while heavily contaminated plastic waste impose high cost processing on existing logistics networks including special washing and drying.

This project will investigate how digitisation and use of GIS-based green supply chain management can be enhanced to address the existing challenges in Australia's plastics recycling supply chains. The aim will be to directly contribute practical models, tools and techniques to contribute to achieving a circular economy for plastics waste.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The PhD will preferably be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Paul Turner for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In this project, HDR students implement and develop of state-of-the-art machine learning and deep learning models, especially in deep reinforcement learning algorithms to easily train intelligent agents for various games. The research goal is to speed up the learning process of multiple agents and allow each agent receives higher rewards in a game scenario. These trained agents can be presented in the demo workshop and can be used for multiple purposes, including testing of game builds and controlling behaviour.

In this project, we used the OpenAI Gym and Unity platform, which have been developed for creating and interacting with simulation environments. Specifically, the Unity ML Agents Toolkit is an open-source Unity plugin that enables games and simulations to serve as environments for training intelligent agents. This project will use this toolkit to develop dynamic multi-agent interaction, and agents can be trained using reinforcement learning, imitation learning, neuro-evolution, or other machine learning methods through a simple-to-use Python API.

Additionally, this project is mutually beneficial for both students and AI researchers as it provides a central platform where advances in AI can be evaluated on rich environments and then made accessible to the industry and research developer communities.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidate from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply
Selection Criteria
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zehong Cao for further information.

Closing Date

28th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Deep Learning recently lends itself extremely well to the research in computer vision domain where hierarchical structures of computational neurons can learn predictive features to effectively make predictive decisions. For example, in health care, deep learning is becoming also popular among medical imaging researchers who are looking for great tools to process a large number of images produced by scanners.

The impact of this to the society is potential and attract more and more attention from health care experts who have been looking for better methods to reduce the error rates in diagnosis. However, the most common deep learning models used for image processing are CNN-based which is a complex black-box consisting of millions of parameters that confused the experts of why the decisions are made. As a result, there is an increasing scepticism from those who do not want to use deep learning because of the lack of explainability.

In this research, the student will improve the transparency of deep neural networks to provide insights of the decision-making process. The topics of interest are (but not limited to):

  • Medical imaging (eye disease detection, knee pain prevention, etc.)
  • Visual reasoning, image captioning
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Son Tran for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Due to the advent of technologies such as 5G and IoT, the increase in network traffic has been exponential; consequently, presenting a larger set of opportunities for intrusion attacks on network traffic. Furthermore, the complexity and nature of these attacks can surely go undetected as they can easily be impersonated as normal behaviour (For example, DoS - Denial of Service attacks).

Due to high levels of work intensity and frequent turnovers, it is impractical for an organisation to leverage human intervention; especially, early-career engineers as the nature of this work requires higher understandings of hacking techniques.
In this project, we will conduct research that utilises Machine Learning to develop a model that can be applied to practice using payload detection in real-world Intrusion Detection (IDS) and Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS). The targeted high detection rate of our model will significantly reduce the network payloads that need to be verified; consequently, overcoming human dependency.

Furthermore, we will devise a distributed methodology via Blockchain to detect not only network attacks but also intrusions based on abnormal behaviours that can be easily missed by an engineer. This methodology can be a novelty for Collaborative Intrusion Detection Systems (CIDS) to detect attacks such as Denial of Service (DoS) with high accuracy.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the past decade, blockchain has been one of the most revolutionary technologies that will have a far-reaching transformational effect across almost every industry in the coming years. A lot of organizations are examining its benefits for the sake of industries such as healthcare, law enforcement, asset management, forestry, agriculture, voting, and notarization. Given that every organization needs to share data, knowledge and assets; blockchains necessarily need to interoperate with each other.

Blockchain interoperability not only means the possibility to share and exchange, digital assets and arbitrary data but also to reference chain code across heterogeneous and multiple blockchain networks. However, the smart contract/chain code in a blockchain can be written in several different languages, thus, limiting the possibility of code reusability among blockchain networks.

In this project, we will conduct research to devise a chain code virtualization methodology for an interoperable blockchain ecosystem where the scale of execution of smart contracts is beyond a single block or a single chain deployment. Thus, enabling a new generation of distributed applications that can be built on the aggregation of smart contracts, written in different languages, like workflows and orchestrations

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

2nd April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the last decade, there is an increasing trend towards adaptation using "Industry 4.0" in the organizations by connecting digital technologies, automation and big data with industry processes, products and logistics. Yet, its application in wood supply chains has not been fully investigated. In the forest sector, limited information is available that could offer opportunities for value adding to traditional forest products (e.g.logs, veneers) from each stand. This is because the limited data collected is primarily done manually adn there remains limited data mining. Additionally, information sharing within and along wood supply chains (pre- and post-harvest) remains limited. Enhancing  digital data collection and analysis prior, during and post-harvest operations will enhance efficient information supply and open up new options for industry 4.0 innovation in ways to significantly change supply chain processes.

This project investigates the application of industry 4.0 in wood supply chains through implementation of an " internet of trees and services (IoTS)" and aims to explore technical and socio-economic challenges and opportunities

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement
  • Applicants must demonstrate experience and strong interest in Data Science, IoT and Blockchain

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Paul Turner for further information.

Closing Date

2nd April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Agribusinesses including forestry remain an industrial pillar for Australia with 15%+ by value of Australia's total exports. However, it can be argued that sustainable production and consumption remains limited and that potentially valuable opportunities are being squandered while international competitors respond to customer demand for greater sustainability, traceability and carbon neutrality from business practices. Advanced techniques in generation and utilisation of digitalisation of the information within the supply chain provides opportunities to mitigate the adverse effects of the unsustainable consumption and production patterns. Industry 4.0 offers solutions to optimise the logistics networks and enhance both economic and environmental parameters in a circular economy are facilitating waste reduction, recycling and re-use. These solutions include Industrial Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing (CC), Big data, Machine Learning, Human-Computer Interaction, Simulation, Augmented and Virtual Reality (AR/VR) and Cyber-security.

This project investigates the consequences of linking the industry 4.0 and Circular Economy in agribusiness for environmental and socio-economic benefit.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The PhD will preferably be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Paul Turner for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The rapid growth of the Internet and web applications provide an overwhelming amount of information. Benefited from online social mediums and crowd computing platforms, it is very easy to collection information from various sources nowadays. In the process of information digitisation, the information of an entity can be generated from multiple sources and the information digitised or collected might be conflicted, with different qualities and even from fake or malicious sources.

It is crucial to find out the truth (truths) of an entity from different sources which provide information about the entity. However, for many web applications are operated under uncertain and dynamic environments. There may exist no evaluation standard for information quality or ground truth, and the information sources can be dynamic.

Under such environments, the discovery and mining of truth/truths is critical. In this project, we will investigate the use of advance AI and data mining techniques in estimation trustworthiness or shared or crowd sourced information.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer science
  • Mathematical sciences
  • Data analytics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The innovation of artificial intelligence and cognitive science aims to explore and simulate the complex and powerful information processing mechanism of the human brain and promote machines to a higher intelligence level as human brains. Visual neural calculation aims to "do what the brain does", the central idea of which is to explore the mysteries of the human visual system. It is a complex interdisciplinary problem to establish an appropriate neural computing model and simulate the visual information processing mechanism in the human brain so as to better extract feature information.

With the continuous development of brain cognitive science, there have been more opportunities for visual neural calculation. Its development direction is to investigate the knowledge learnt in the visual domain by popular pre-trained vision models (CNN-based framework) and use it to teach a recurrent model being trained on brain (EEG) signals to learn a discriminative manifold of the human brain's cognition of different visual object categories in response to perceived visual cues.

Eligibility
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zehong Cao for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Constraints such as periodic moisture stress and soil acidity can limit the production and persistence of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and lucerne (Medicago sativa L.), respectively across beef and sheep regions of southern Australia. While the annual subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.) is well adapted, it falls short of providing all the functional services of a perennial legume. This includes providing greater all year-round ground cover, reducing the risk soil erosion during summer and providing a valuable and nutritious feed source later in the season.

Reviews by both Nichols et al. (2012) and Bell et al. (2014) highlight the persistence-related traits and potential of alternative perennial legumes such as Caucasian clover and Talish clover. While the value of perennial legumes is widely acknowledged and that while some suitable perennial legumes are available, adoption of these alternative perennial legumes has been low. One of the key barriers to adoption of these species is their slow establishment in mixed grass/legume swards. Slow establishment seems related to the partitioning of energy to root development rather than leaf development. In terms of competitive ability for light, this places alternative legumes at a disadvantage early when sown with perennial grasses, who put most of their energy into leaf development in early establishment. It also means that grazing needs to be delayed until there has been sufficient leaf development of these legumes.

Timing of sowing, sowing rates, use of herbicide to reduce existing vegetation competition, spatial and temporal separation of seed at sowing, and pairing with slow establishing grasses are techniques that have either been suggested or trialled in an attempt to improve the competitiveness of novel legumes in establishing pastures. Success has been varied, often site- and season-specific and requires further investigation. This project focusses on the establishment of alternative legume species using different sowing techniques. Research will involve on-farm and on-station experiments using a range of sowing techniques, perennial legume species and paddock preparation.

This is yet to be funded. The project is subject to funding confirmation.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • There will be a significant fieldwork component, so applicants need to be able to work at remote sites, often in uncomfortable weather conditions. Furthermore, this study fits into a larger program of work so the applicant needs to be able to work individually and as part of a wider team contributing to a large project
  • Candidates with a background in Agricultural Science are encouraged to apply and knowledge and skills in pasture and forage science, and livestock systems is desirable

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rowan Smith for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Pulse grain storage for extended periods of time has been observed to experience biochemical and physical changes that affect the hydration properties of pulses. This affects the processing and nutrition quality of pulse grains and the quality of products made from them.
Extended storage, particularly under unfavourable conditions of high temperature and low relative humidity, is known to result in two undesirable phenomena:

  • "hard shell (HS)" phenomenon, where seeds fail to imbibe water when soaked and remain hard (associated with impermeability of the seed coat and postharvest dormancy)
  • and the "hard-to-cook (HTC)" phenomenon where the seeds imbibes normally, but the cotyledon fails to fully hydrate and soften during cooking

This project is designed to better understand the genetic basis for HS and HTC in order to support a better mechanistic understanding and support the identification of genetic markers for use in quality assurance and breeding.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, John Bowman for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is to develop and substantiate the benefits of cereal and pulse grain based infant/toddler food through germination technology that protects infants/toddlers in developing countries such as Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka from infant/toddler malnutrition disorder (muscle wasting, stunted growth, pallor, lethargy, increased susceptibility to infection, and fatigue).

In 2016, the global infant/toddler food market is expected to rise by 9.3% and reach US$ 24.5 billion in revenues. The project addresses the issue of product development and infant/toddler nutrition with a view to increasing the nutritional quality and the retention of the nutritional properties of infant/toddler food, especially targeting infants/toddlers who are subjected to malnourishment because of the socioeconomic conditions of their country of birth. We propose a dietary approach of modifying the current infant/toddler food formulation which is generally dairy based to include cereal and pulse grain that will include a variety of nutritionally and health functional components:

  • Develop and upscale for food manufacturing a shelf stable infant/toddler food
  • Provide a nutritionally balanced breast milk supplement or substitute
  • Provide a prebiotic enhanced plant-based food that is genetically modified organism (GMO) dairy, gluten, lactose and soy free
  • Provide adequate energy requirement
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, John Bowman for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Brewers Spent Grain (BSG) is a major by-product of the brewing industry equating to around 85% of the total by-products. BSG is rich in nutritional functional food components and protein isolates. BSG is currently used in the animal feeding industry and as organic fertilizer for soil improvement with the remainder going to landfill or dumping sites which result in environmental concern.

BSG functional food components
Post malt wort extraction, BSG contains a large amount of functional food components (Crude Lipid, Ash, dietary fibre, Polysaccharide arabinoxylans, Lignin, Minerals Vitamins Phenolic compounds) as well as insoluble proteins and essential amino acids (Threonine, Tryptophan, Phenylalanine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Valine and Histidine).

The aim of this study is to:

  • Develop the technologically for the isolation and concentration of functional protein ingredients from brewing waste
  • Investigate scale up potential for BSG protein extraction and concentration
  • Formulating and manufacturing consumer acceptable, commercially-relevant prototype food products that incorporating the optimal health enhancing BSG proteins.
Eligibility
  • Masters degree in food science
  • At least on first author published article in  scientific publication
  • Laboratory experience in food chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Adel Yousif for further information.

Closing Date

2nd April 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Pyrethrum is an important part of cropping production in Tasmania, being grown for the natural insecticides pyrethrins.  Diseases of pyrethrum are a major constraint on production in Tasmania caused by a complex of fungal pathogens.  Management of these diseases requires the use of multiple applications of chemical fungicides each year.  However, this exposes the industry to the risk of resistance building up within the pathogen population, reducing the efficacy of control leading to undesirable impacts on the economics and environmental sustainability of pyrethrum production.

This project will focus on understanding the risk of fungicide resistance in key fungal pathogens of pyrethrum.  Potential studies include looking into the genetic mechanisms that govern resistance, assessing the current extent of resistance present in field populations and evaluating the risk of resistance developing in the future.  Answering questions associated with these issues will help the pyrethrum industry better manage fungicide usage into the future.  As such, the project aims to produce impactful outcomes for Tasmanian agriculture.

In conducting this project, the candidate will be supported by, and collaborate with, Botanical Resources Australia, the commercial operator of the Australian pyrethrum industry.  The project will involve a combination of field-, glasshouse- and laboratory-based experimentation.  The project will be based at the Cradle Coast Campus of UTAS.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Plant pathology
  • Mycology
  • Molecular biology
  • Botany
  • Agronomy
  • Horticulture

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jason Scott for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Beef producers in Tasmanian high rainfall regions of NW TAS experience feed shortages during autumn and winter, and recent modelling by TIA has also highlighted a contraction of pasture growth during summer; these feed shortages lead to stagnation in growth rates of beef cattle. Furthermore, although the high rainfall is conducive to high pasture productivity, the low-lying flat nature of some regions such as King Island leads to prolonged waterlogging, pugging and compaction and feed intake issues due to lower feed on offer, spoilage of feed and high moisture content. Improving the perennial legume component of pasture swards so they are productive and tolerant to waterlogged conditions is likely to assist in addressing feed shortages leading to improved animal performance.

Improving drainage, grazing management, and appropriate species selection appear the best techniques for maximising production and persistence of pastures under these conditions. This project will focus on appropriate species selection through experimental glasshouse screening of waterlogging tolerant legumes and researching the genotype x environment x management interactions under field conditions.

This is yet to be funded. The project is subject to funding confirmation.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • There will be a significant glasshouse and fieldwork component, so applicants need to be able to work at remote sites, often in uncomfortable weather conditions. Furthermore, this study fits into a larger program of work so the applicant needs to be able to work individually and as part of a wider team contributing to a large project
  • Candidates with a background in Agricultural Science are encouraged to apply and knowledge and skills in pasture and forage science, plant physiology, or livestock systems is desirable

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rowan Smith for further information.

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