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From here you can shape the world.

Research is an integral aspect of the College, and our research degrees equip graduates with the skills, knowledge, confidence and connections to kick start, or further, their careers.

The College of Sciences and Engineering offers a diverse range of research degrees in each of our disciplines, from hard science to creative design.

We recognise the importance of academic and non-academic careers, and work closely with industry to cross-skill our graduates with real-world experience.

Our research degrees may see you travelling to Antarctica, testing cutting-edge technology in local micro-breweries, or designing new naval ships or sustainable housing. Choose a research degree from the University of Tasmania’s College of Sciences and Engineering.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Looking for undergraduate options?
Visit the 'Find a Course' page to explore our study options

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

30th December 2019*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Hyperthermia (HT) is an intended artificial increase of temperature over the temperature of human body within the range of 39 ⸰C and 46 ⸰C and acts on cells and tissues e.g. cancer cells and tissues. The application of clinical hyperthermia can be either divided as a whole-body, regional or local. The heating techniques are often characterized as superficial or deep or as external and internal. Hyperthermia technique also improves the efficiency of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia with radiotherapy or chemotherapy has been demonstrated in treatment of certain cancers e.g. breast cancer, cervical and bladder cancer, rectal cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer, superficial tumours, lung and stomach cancer and pancreas and liver metastases. However, the knowledge of the heat transfer process within the blood perfused tissues and the temperature distribution in tissues and organs are essential for an effective thermal therapy such as hyperthermia cancer treatment.

The rise in temperature of tissues during heating is largely dependent on the influx of heat from the external heat source and also on the efflux of heat through dissipation by the circulating blood. Therefore, preferential heating and damage of tumour can be expected only if heat is preferentially delivered to the tumour or if heat dissipation by blood flow is slower in the tumours than in the surrounding normal tissues. Blood flow also affects the response of tissue to radiation. It should be pointed out that the supply and distribution of drugs in tissues are also largely dependent on the blood perfusion in the tissues. It is then apparent that blood flow plays the central role in determining the effectiveness of hyperthermia used alone or in conjunction with radiotherapy or chemotherapy.

From the computational mechanics point of view, exploring the temperature distribution in HT involves multiple subjects, e.g. convection-diffusion, porous media, rheology, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and the determination of optimal HT conditions requires a comprehensive model and numerical method that has the ability to take all the mentioned factors into account and simulate. A mesoscopic method based on Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) will be used in this study.

Eligibility
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Programming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Mathematical Modelling, LBM, Fortran, Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI), Rheology, heat and mass transfer, Porous media
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Gholamreza Kefayati for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Women are generally underrepresented in the STEM fields and in entrepreneurial ventures linked to high technology domains. This project will use the latest psychological and sociological research to propose a framework to facilitate that more girls and young women enter and remain in those STEM and entrepreneurial fields where they are significantly underrepresented. The framework will be designed to actively encourage creativity, inventiveness, and global awareness in harmony with the development of a socially responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial mindset. Strategies will be designed, tested and fine-tuned in diverse settings within the secondary and tertiary education sectors, and within the emerging Tasmanian STEM-based entrepreneurial ecosystem, respectively.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is a computationally efficient method for full wave-based computational acoustics simulations, even so it requires significant computational resources for shorter wavelengths. However the most interesting problems are at moderate wavelengths where there is significant diffraction. A particularly interesting class of problems involves coupling between the acoustic medium and its boundaries (fluid-structure interaction). Examples include sound transmission through panels, absorption by curtains near walls, porous surfaces.

This project aims to extend the computational capabilities of the acoustic BEM, with regard to structural coupling, porous surfaces, higher order methods, the effect of corners and edges, etc. These developments can then be applied to problems such as those mentioned above. Through collaboration or co-supervision with colleagues in University of Sydney the project may have access to high class experimental facilities for validation of the models.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied maths, physics or any branch of engineering with an interest in mathematics or computation
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Damien Holloway for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project aims to control the voltage and frequency of the electrical power system by employing Distributed Energy Resources (DERs). By changing the types of generation units from conventional to non-nonconventional, the penetration level of DERs including PVs, Electric Vehicles, Batteries, partially and fully rated wind energy conversion systems, thermal variable loads etc. are increasing in the grid. As the solid-state devices, the DERs do not contribute in inertial response if there is any contingency event in the network. Therefore, the power system is fragile, and the frequency control needs special considerations.

In this project, the candidate will work on innovative control approaches of the DERs to contribute in the primary and secondary responses after any event occurs. The candidate also considers new methods to coordinate DERs in voltage and frequency response in a power system with moderate and high penetration of DERs. In that case, the candidate is also expected to study about scheduling and dispatch of resources in a way that to ensure operation within network constrains all the times.

Eligibility
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in Electrical Engineering
  • Applicants must have excellent writing and communication skills (Please see the English Test requirements, TOEFL or IELTS tests, for PhD candidates on the website of the university).
    Experience with modelling and simulation tools.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Power Engineering (power electronics and/or power systems)
Selection Criteria
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
    Applicants must have Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (probably, Honours BEng Degree First Class, or Master's by Research, or equivalent).
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must be able to work with others as part of a project team and be willing to take direction.
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as PSCAD, Python, and MATLAB.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Evan Franklin and Behzad Naderi for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is aimed to develop a three-dimensional hybrid continuous-discontinuous method for studying dynamic fracture of rock under impact and cyclic loads and arching behaviour of resultant irregular-shaped deformable and further breakable fragments.

The project will address:

  1. How can the transition of rock from continua to discontinua during fracture be modelled?
  2. How can the hybrid method be accelerated using heterogeneous CPU and GPU parallel computing technique for large-scale real time modelling?
  3. How can the hybrid method to consider dependence of rock strength on loading rates and how can heterogeneity be implemented to simulate rock fracture progressive process?
  4. How can the hybrid method be calibrated against well-known dynamic/cyclic rock fracture experiments?
  5. How can the hybrid method be applied to model rock fragmentations in rock boring & blast and rock mass instability in surface and underground excavations.

The outcome of this project will improve the rock mass excavation / fragmentation efficiency in rock cutting, drilling, crushing and blasting, and improve the rock mass stability in surface and underground excavation in mining, tunnelling and civil engineering. This project will improve our access to natural resources, especially deep or offshore natural resources, and safeguard our existing and new infrastructures.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Continuous or discontinuous mechanics
  • Programming skills (preferably C/C++ and Python)
  • Computer graphics

More Information

Please contact Dr Hong Y Liu for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Hobart based shipbuilder, INCAT, builds some of the world's largest and fastest high speed aluminium catamaran ferries. Critical to the success of INCAT's vessels has been their ability to operate at high speed in heavy seas, and INCAT's position as worldwide leaders in their market niche has been assisted over more than two decades by ongoing collaborative research with the University of Tasmania's School of Engineering. A long term goal is to optimise the ship structure, minimising weight without compromising integrity at critical locations. Past recent research in this area has sought to quantify the loads exerted during a slam (severe wave impact) event. Structural vibrations following a slam (known as "whipping") are known to significantly modify the internal forces as determined by a quasi static analysis, and their effect has been partially quantified through testing of a 2.5m hydroelastic model, full scale strain measurements, and dynamic finite element analysis. The current project aims to extend this work by relating the asymmetric slams and bending moments to the asymmetric design loads within the superstructure connecting the two hulls (referred to as "pitch connecting moment" and "split loads") whilst further quantifying the motions response in oblique sea directions. This has the capacity to influence international design codes and to provide a more rational framework for the determination of design loads in similar ships worldwide.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in shipping industry
  • Model testing experience in towing tanks or model test basins
  • Marine engineering or naval architecture academic background
  • Experience in use of Computational Fluid Mechanics and/or Finite Element Analysis

More Information

Please contact Dr Jason Lavroff for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus in obtaining an improved theoretical understanding of the time- and frequency-domain properties of fractional-order linear-time invariant single-input single-output control systems. Thus, the proposed research work will be conducted simultaneously in both the time- and frequency-domains and seek to more closely relate several fundamental concepts in each domain to others in the counterpart domain. In particular, this research project will seek to:

  1. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the time-domain features of their impulse and step responses;
  2. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the behaviour of the frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics of those systems;
  3. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their impulse and step responses;
  4. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their frequency-domain responses;
  5. Propose new fractional-order controller design methodologies for the closed-loop control of fractional-order plants that make use of the results obtained in parts a) to d).

Some of the fundamental time- and frequency-domain concepts which will be instrumental in progressing the proposed research include: extrema in the time-domain step responses, pole-zero patterns, and frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics.

Eligibility
  • The applicant should have a number of publications indexed in the Web of Science
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the Web of Science would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply: Engineering, Mathematics and Science 

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Bernardo Leon de la Barra for further information.

Closing Date

1 November 2019 

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD project will develop appropriate techno-economic models for Tasmania's energy system, including its interaction with the NEM, to analyse a wide range of likely future scenarios and their implications.

The proposed project introduces several areas of novelty and originality. The innovations include joint engineering and economic modelling of generation and storage technology characteristics and their role in meeting short-term power system requirements as well as their role in balancing energy supply and demand and their implications for energy markets. Included in the analysis of future scenarios is the significant transition to or increase in flexible loads such as electrified transport, hydrogen synthesis for export markets, and for direct export of energy over possible future additional interconnects.

This project will be co-supervised by members of Future Energy in the School of Engineering and the Tasmanian School of Business and Economics and will also be supported by Future Energy co-directors and other members.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Applicants must either have Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (Honours BEng Degree First Class, or Master's by Research, or equivalent) or a Master's research degree in Economics AND an undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (or equivalent).

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must be able to work with others as part of a project team and be willing to take direction
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as PSCAD, Python, and MATLAB
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Evan Franklin for further information.

Closing Date

26th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

For 5G systems, massive MIMO (multiple antennas) are deployed.  When fading is fast, Doppler shift also tend to be present, and channel models are complex under these conditions.  This project aims to develop models that are computationally efficient, as well as realistic for the simulation of communication systems deployed over such channels.  The aim is to develop computer code that will provide realistic scenario testing under complex communication systems simulation conditions.

Eligibility
  • First class honours in engineering, mathematics or physics
  • Ability to work independently
  • Strong computer programming skills and proficiency

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Engineering, physics, mathematics/statistics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, JC Olivier for further information.

Closing Date

13th October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Background
Self-driving vehicles are one of the most significant technical advances bringing profound changes to our life styles. Many trials haven been rolled out to practice during the last few years, which are demonstrating promising outcomes. The technical feasibility has been proven and national roadmaps of intelligent highway system, aka smart road, have been developed in many countries including USA, China, Australia, and European countries.
Various communication networks such as internet, IoT sensor networks, 5G wireless communication networks, and intra-vehicle networks, etc., play a pivotal role in smart traffic system to support future road users such as self-driving vehicles. However, existing communication networks for generic purpose, so far, cannot provide appropriate level of performance guarantee for safe driving.

Research questions
The nature of highway system is the appropriate and distributed sharing of road among all users with their own objectives and subject to own set of constraints. Such a system has a special safety requirement since each road user has its own control without coordination nor consensus. Various factors such as sensors and physical signals, communication, motion and control, human reaction and decision making, machine processing and decision making, etc., make it extremely difficult to meet every road user's needs as well as to maintain road safety.      
Due to its special features, it is desirable to analyse the communication needs and design an appropriate communication system for that rather than adopt a general-purpose communication system for use.  

Methods
The following aspects are considered for the analysis, design, and development of a novel communication system architecture and protocols:

  • Analysis of road users' communication, control, and mechanical features with respect to collision avoidance and driving planning
  • Use a minimalist approach to design a layered communication network
  • Analysis and design of appropriate network protocols 
  • Analysis and comparison of the proposed communication network model with existing models

Expected outcomes
As the outcome of the proposed research, we expect to build a minimalist communication network model. Such model is considered necessary to any smart road to facilitate intelligent road sharing among all self-driving vehicles and ordinary human driving vehicles, with or without sophisticated communication and control systems.
A simulation prototype model will be developed to illustrate the proposed method and demonstrate its efficiency.
The research outcomes will be communicated in 3~5 technical papers to seek other experts' feedbacks.

Eligibility
  • Strongly self-motivated in research
  • Communication networks and protocol design
  • Dynamical system and control
  • Computing and simulation

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Danchi Jiang for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

We have developed an automated blood oxygen level controller for preterm infants that has recently been undergoing clinical trials. This PhD project aims to make further advances by investigating enhancements to our current oxygen control algorithm and technology.

Potential research areas include development of advanced algorithms and predictive methods to enhance the control algorithm, for example by using intelligent pattern recognition including neural network techniques and our extensive clinical signal database.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, including Biomedical, Mechatronic and Electrical/Electronics Engineering.

More Information

Please contact Dr Tim Gale for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The State of Tasmania exhibits some of the lowest levels of educational attainment among Australia’s states and territories. This project will use the latest educational, psychological and sociological research to design practical research- and evidence-based strategies to enthuse Tasmanian children to fully engage during their schooling years. The strategies will collectively target and inclusively align the many stakeholders (parents, guardians, teachers, peers, career counsellors, etc.) that play a role in influencing children’s aspirations for a better and brighter future. The strategies will be designed, tested, evaluated, and fine-tuned in diverse formal and informal educational settings. The project will make use of trans-disciplinary and integrative learning approaches with a strong focus on bridging the gap between the STEM and STEAM domains.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

1 November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Australia is the world leader in the design and manufacture of state of the art large aluminium ferries, and Incat Australia Pty Ltd (Incat) is one of the dominant builders of these vessels in the international market. Research is required to increase reliability, seakeeping and passenger comfort of Incat vessels by improving vessel design, systems and performance in relation to the key operational conditions of vessel speed and random wave characteristics. To satisfy these overarching design requirements, this Project aims to:

  1. Establish an ongoing ship monitoring system to remotely measure vessel motions and structural loads, exploiting cloud technology to obtain real time-data on vessel performance.
  2. Improve structural efficiency by analysing large datasets at full-scale using sophisticated statistical methods to more accurately predict the peak wave loads acting on the vessel.
  3. Improve passenger comfort by extensively investigating and interpreting the motions response of the vessel and ride control activity under commercial operating conditions.
  4. Develop a “Smart” semi-autonomous interface to provide on-board seakeeping guidance to the operator in moderate and rough seas to increase ship safety, vessel longevity and improve passenger comfort.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours or Upper Second Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background skills and experience in Marine Engineering or Naval Architecture specific to high-speed craft;
  • Knowledge and  experience in stochastic process modeling;
  • Well-developed skills in programming, data analyses or optimisation techniques.

Applicants MUST include a one-page cover letter expressing their interest in the project based on their background experience whilst also addressing their suitability for the project.

Successful PhD applicants with a background in mechanical engineering, civil, marine engineering or naval architecture will be based at the University of Tasmania in Hobart.

Successful PhD applicants with a background in applied statistics will be based at a partner institute in Sydney. Those interested in applying for the position in Sydney must directly contact Dr Babak Shabani to discuss the application process.

More Information

Please contact Dr Babak Shabani for more information prior to applying.

Closing Date

26th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

5G networks have gone to market, and the telecommunications industry is currently deploying 5G networks globally.   5G networks deploy a few key technologies that differentiate it from 3G and 4G.  First it makes use of low density parity check codes (LDPC), as well as the new polar codes.  Secondly it makes use of massive parallel multiple sensor arrays both at the receiver and transmitter (MIMO), and thirdly it uses highly efficient orthogonal frequency domain multiplexing (OFDM) to mitigate channel dispersion and other channel impairments.  There are a range of issues still not well understood and not yet fully optimised that will feed into these key technologies.  This project aims to apply the theory of estimation and detection, approximation theory and graph theory to mitigate these issues.

Eligibility
  • Strong ability and proficiency in applied mathematics
  • Highly developed proficiency in developing computer software and performing computer simulation
  • Ability to work independently

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Engineering, physics, statistics and mathematics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, JC Olivier for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Spiny lobsters are one of the world’s most valuable seafood commodities making them an attractive candidate for aquaculture. They have many favourable biological features, however to date commercial scale aquaculture has not been possible due to major bottlenecks during the larval phase of development. Project supervision will be provided by leading experts from IMAS and the School of Engineering.

The PhD project will develop hardware and software for capturing, processing and analysing images and then apply it to interpret and determine key elements of lobster larval (phyllosoma) morphology and physiology. The process of image recognition for phyllosoma will be a challenging goal as phyllosoma are small (1.5 – 30 mm, total length) and transparent with minimal body thickness. Key phyllosoma features such as eyes, antennas, legs and body are discernible, however the orientation and position of the animals and limbs will vary in water. The rapid assessment and documentation of stage specific morphological characteristics associated with the complex larval life-history has never before been studied in such detail. The technology will be applied to identify feed ingestion during culture and experimentally, the duration to satiation, optimising feeding regimes, health monitoring, moult events, and pre-metamorphosis phyllosoma.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international applicants. Preference will be given to applicants who can commence in 2019
  • The PhD study must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must hold a degree from a Recognised Tertiary Institution as being in the appropriate discipline and equivalent to: - A Bachelor Honours degree of at least second class upper standard with a Minimum Research Component - A Masters of Research Degree with a Minimum Research Component - A Masters Degree (Coursework) or Graduate Diploma with a Minimum Research Component.
  • Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to provide: IELTS with Minimum Overall Score of 6.5, while achieved 6.5 for writing and speaking and no other band less than 6.0 (academic module), or TOEFL with Minimum Overall Score of 92, while achieved 26 for writing and speaking, and 20 for reading and listening, or PTE Academic with Minimum Overall Score of 58, while achieved 58 for writing and speaking with no other score lower than 50

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Alan Henderson for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Spiny lobsters are one of the world’s most valuable seafood commodities making them an attractive candidate for aquaculture. They have many favourable biological features, however to date commercial scale aquaculture has not been possible due to major bottlenecks during the larval phase of development. Project supervision will be provided by leading experts from IMAS and the School of Engineering.

The PhD project will develop hardware and software for capturing, processing and analysing images and then apply it to interpret and determine key elements of lobster larval (phyllosoma) morphology and physiology. The process of image recognition for phyllosoma will be a challenging goal as phyllosoma are small (1.5 – 30 mm, total length) and transparent with minimal body thickness. Key phyllosoma features such as eyes, antennas, legs and body are discernible, however the orientation and position of the animals and limbs will vary in water. The rapid assessment and documentation of stage specific morphological characteristics associated with the complex larval life-history has never before been studied in such detail. The technology will be applied to identify feed ingestion during culture and experimentally, the duration to satiation, optimising feeding regimes, health monitoring, moult events, and pre-metamorphosis phyllosoma.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Engineering
  • Sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alan Henderson for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Currently, there are numerous methods and techniques aimed at extending the service life or repair existing structural elements. Bolting or welding of steel plates, applying CFRP and external prestressed tendons are the most common among these techniques. Nevertheless, these techniques have limitations and disadvantages such as increasing the self-weight of the structure, introducing stress concentration, reducing the fatigue lie of the structure or high labour and materials cost. Among the recently developed repairing and upgrading methods is the so-called Local Post-Tensioning (LPT) which increases the stiffness and the load carrying capacity of the structural member through adding reinforcing steel bars to a segment of the beam.

This project will be investigating the use of innovative strengthening and upgrading techniques (or their combinations) in order to extend the service life and restore the load carrying capacity of various steel, concrete or composite structural elements. The candidate will be using nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, experiments, or both to validate theoretical findings.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Civil (Structural  Engineering)

More Information

Please contact Dr Assaad Taoum to discuss prior to applying.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Some forms of structural failure can be quite abrupt (e.g. buckling) whereas others may exhibit early warning signs. I have an interest in understanding and predicting both types of failure, and in measures to mitigate them. In the former category I am particularly interested in moderately thin walled shells, the effect of irregular geometries (e.g. cutouts, defects) and in local reinforcement. These could be studied by nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, or experimentally. In the latter category there is a growing body of knowledge on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) using sensors and ambient excitations (such as wind loading) to detect changes in a structure. Wind turbine towers and blades are examples of application of these two areas.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A background in one or more of:
    • civil/structural engineering
    • computational mechanics
    • applied mathematics
    • signal processing
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Damien Holloway for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Micro-grids encounter high renewable energy penetrations early, given their small size. The inherent variability is managed with enabling technologies such as energy storage. This proposal aims to eliminate the cost and complexity of energy storage, via adoption of synthetic storage. Synthetic storage allows for improved renewable penetration and reduced diesel fuel consumption. The approach investigates replacement of fixed speed diesel assets with variable speed diesel technology, for improved generator flexibility, response and efficiency. The expected project outcomes include both a reduction in cost and complexity for high renewable energy penetration micro-grids. Project benefits extend to reduced emissions and improved reliability. The research improves accessibility and affordability of renewable energy based micro-grids, addressing the key barriers of cost and complexity.  The outcomes include the ability of existing micro-grid configurations to transition from low to high levels of renewable energy penetration without a reliance on energy storage technologies. The benefits in simplifying the micro-grid framework include, accelerated uptake and utilisation of renewable energy, grid consolidation and grid decarbonisation, the impacts of which extend to cleaner, cheaper energy provision.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Hybrid diesel power system simulation;
  • Wind turbine generator simulation;
  • Power converter configuration and simulation.

More Information

Please contact Michael Negnevitsky for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Marine phytoplankton drive global climate, form the base of marine food-webs, and can cause ecosystem disruption and collapse due to harmful algal blooms. In the ocean, phytoplankton interact with bacterial symbionts - their microbiomeswhich lab studies show are essential for their growth. However, we currently know almost nothing about phytoplankton microbiomes in natural marine systems, or how they interact to enhance the growth and toxicity of harmful algal blooms.

A PhD research opportunity is open for a talented graduate to investigate the diversity and function of natural phytoplankton microbiome, and how they enhance growth and toxicity of harmful dinoflagellates. The project combines microfluidics and single-cell genomics and microbial community profiling using NGS sequencing to characterise microbiome membership, structure and function directly from phytoplankton blooms. Using lab model co-culture techniques, the project will also determine how microbiomes are recruited by toxic phytoplankton, and examine their role in algal physiology and toxin production.

The project is supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch and Andrew Bridle and will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania in Launceston. The project also includes collaboration with researchers in the Scotland (Scottish Association for Marine Science) and the USA (New York University).

Essential skills/experience

Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in molecular biology and/or microbiology are encouraged to apply. Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships.

Desirable skills/experience

Candidates with strong computing skills and experience of collecting and analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably.

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Christopher Bolch at chris.bolch@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

17th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Southern Ocean is projected to experience significant changes to its physical state in future years due to anthropogenic climate change. These changes are, in turn, likely to have significant impacts on the marine ecosystems in the region.

This project will explore the link between variability in the assessed icefish population in the Australian EEZ on the Kergeulen Plateau and observed environmental variability, before extending this work using climate projections to give an estimate of the impacts of future climate scenarios on this (and other) species over the coming century.

Eligibility
  • Strong analytical skills, including expertise with a suitable high-level analysis software package (eg Matlab or R)
  • Understanding of the functioning and drivers of marine ecosystems
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Knowledge of Southern Ocean marine ecosystems
  • Experience in statistical modelling
  • Knowledge of the impact of marine heat waves on ecosystems
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stuart Corney for further information.

Closing Date

27th December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Illegal unreported and unregulated (IUU) is a key threat to the sustainability of marine ecosysystems and livelihoods around the world. Fishing accounts for approximately 8% of global employment, makes up 1% of global trade and is worth over US $102 billion per year. It is estimated that IUU fishing accounts for between 11 to 19% of total catch, resulting in economic losses of $11-19 billion annually. One key IUU issue across southeast Asia is the use of explosives as a fishing strategy.

One key issue that has received scant attention in the move to address IUU fishing globally is the role of small scale commercial vessels. These vessels make up approximately half of the global fish catch, and in some countries more than 90% of the total vessels. Yet, technologies for monitoring their activities are still in the early stages of development.

The candidate will work with government and NGO partners in Indonesia and East Timor, along with the UTAS-CSIRO project team, to understand the behaviour of small scale fishing vessels using new vessel tracking technology. The objectives of the analysis are to understand decision-making by the fishers, explore the connection between patterns at sea and vessel landings in the context of optimal foraging theory, and to develop a system that can be used to understand key management issues such as the use of fish aggregating devices, predict fishing grounds, and develop early warning of stock depletion.

Eligibility

Training and /or experience in:

  • programming in a computer language
  • statistic and/or machine learning
  • data handling and manipulation
  • marine ecology, fisheries, conservation biology, or a related field
  • coastal or small scale fisheries and communities
  • speaking /writing in Bahasa Indonesia

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis or entry research degree and institution, prior peer review publication, academic awards, project specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee reports and supervisor support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Sean Tracey for further information.

Closing Date

28th April 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Oceanic fronts are sharp gradients between adjoining water masses and serve as mixing boundaries between water with different features (Belkin, 2009). Frontal processes, across a variety of temporal and spatial scales, operate in concert to drive coastal ecosystem structure and function. Climate change can have a profound effect on front formation leading to changes, which have important consequences for biodiversity. Furthermore, changes in concentration of one or a few 'leverage species' may result in sweeping communitylevel changes raising concerns about fishery sustainability, ecosystem health, and the maintenance of global biogeochemical cycles (Woodson and Litvin, 2015) in coastal regions. Conflicting studies show scenarios of both increasing and decreasing frontal probability due to climate change. It has been shown that there can a reduction in frontal frequency during warming anomalies. However, long term decadal-scale records show increasing trends of frontal activity. Regardless, the trend in front probability has not been shown to be globally uniform.

The first aim of this research is to comprehensively verify global trends of frontal frequency within global marine hotspots and resolve fine-scale frontal features (using new high-resolution satellite imagery) to assess patterns and trends in regional scale hotspot areas. Furthermore, given the variety of scales at which fronts operate, it is critically important to understand frontal activity at depth integrated submesoscales. As fronts play a role in driving local biological activity, unravelling the role of submesoscale dynamics on phytoplankton abundance and diversity is important for quantifying global influence on marine ecosystems.

The second aim of this research is to develop adaptive sampling algorithms for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to characterize submesoscale fronts across depth integrated measurements. When coupled with high resolution satellite measurements (above), unprecedented scales of frontal processes can be visualized.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of remote sensing algorithm development and satellite image processing
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

1st September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Aquaculture is an important industry that is developing rapidly in temperate coastal regions worldwide. While soft-sediment impacts have been relatively well described, there is much less know regarding trophic interactions and how marine food webs may uptake and assimilate additional organic carbon loadings. As aquaculture continues to expand, a greater understanding of these trophic linkages is vital for sustainable development.

Sponges are sessile filter-feeders that are a ubiquitous feature on temperate reefs worldwide. They can be sensitive to organic enrichment, with increases in sedimentation potentially smothering sponges and limiting their capacity to feed and respire effectively. However, they also have the capacity to remove both particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the water column. With a high filtering capacity and association with diverse microbial communities, they are a key link in carbon flow from pelagic to benthic systems and a potential pathway for mitigating aquaculture waste into marine ecosystems. While the role of sponge communities in POC and DOC cycling in tropical reef systems is acknowledged, the capacity for this in temperate reef systems is less well understood. This PhD will explore the assimilatory capacity of temperate reef sponge communities and their potential interaction with finfish aquaculture.

Eligibility
  • Applicants should have a first class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in biological science or human impacts research, with demonstrated experience in the key research areas. Scientific Diver, or similar relevant qualifications or the ability to obtain these are also required
  • Demonstrated experience in laboratory based respiration or metabolism experiments would be beneficial, along with knowledge of temperate reef ecosystems or experience in natural resource management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Camille White for further information.

Closing Date

1st October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Shell characteristics form an important component of the marketability of Pacific oysters. Two of the most important traits are the ratio of shell to meat, and the hardness of the shell.  Brittleness or ‘chalkiness’ in the cultured Pacific oyster can lead to the shell breaking during shucking, leaving the animals unsaleable. This phenomenon is poorly understood but is thought to be associated with faster growth and can occur in particular growing areas, hence nutrition, environment and genetics are suspected to be key factors influencing this condition. Faster growth can also lead to a higher ratio of shell to meat, which is a less desirable marketing characteristic. Breeding programs typically select for growth, meat condition and disease resistance. Pacific oyster selective breeding in Australia has been recently been focussed on disease resistance for Pacific oyster mortality syndrome (POMS). Anecdotal reports have indicated recently that shell brittleness and shell to meat ratio has increased and this may be a negative consequence of selecting for POMS resistance.

This project aims to characterise the variation in shells in Pacific oysters according to husbandry (e.g. rearing location/technique) and family pedigree. In characterising the shell, the general approach will be to examine shell to meat ratios, shell density, and elemental composition. Analysis will include, elemental profiling (e.g. X-ray fluorescent spectrometry XRF and/or inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) for characterising shell and meat composition and stable isotope analysis for tracing nutrient assimilation. The use of these techniques is relatively novel in oyster biology and has recently been demonstrated to be highly informative in ecological studies. The understanding developed from characterising the biology of Pacific oyster shells in this study will be used to develop a rapid phenotyping tools that can be used in selective breeding.  

The project core themes are aquaculture and marine ecology. Supervision will be provided by Dr Andrew Trotter, Associate Professor Greg Smith and the candidate will be based at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at Taroona. A large component of the research includes collaboration with Dr Debashish Mazumder of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in Sydney; and Matt Cunningham of Australian Seafood Industries (Pacific oyster breeding program), also based in Hobart.

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology and zoology or similar are encouraged to apply. In addition to laboratory based work at IMAS, applicants should be comfortable with field trips to oyster farms at various locations in Tasmania and spending periods at ANSTO in Sydney to undertake highly specialised laboratory analysis
  • Research experience or undergraduate training in chemistry. Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andrew Trotter for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

For the past 58 years, science in Antarctica has been carried out under the terms of the Antarctic Treaty, and national and international scientific research programs have been the most conspicuous visible expression of the workings of the treaty. It has been said that "science is the currency of the influence in the Antarctic Treaty" (Press, 2013). This project will study how scientific cooperation among the contracting parties and the consultative parties, how they are organized and how they play their respective roles. The project will focus on China as a specific case study.

Essential skills/experience

  • Understanding of China's Antarctic science program

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Prof Marcus Haward at Marcus.Haward@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

30th March 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Kerguelen Plateau and Broken Ridge large igneous province (LIP) in the southern Indian Ocean formed contiguously by massive mafic volcanism in Early to mid-Cretaceous time. The project will illuminate rifting, breakup, and separation mechanisms and processes of these oceanic end-members, using multibeam bathymetry, sub-bottom-profiling, seismic reflection, gravity, and magnetics data. The project involves participating in a 59-day voyage in early 2020 aboard the research vessel (RV) Investigator during which the data will be acquired.

Eligibility
  • A desire to undertake marine geoscientific fieldwork
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geophysics or geosciences
  • Familiarity with geophysical data acquisition, processing, and interpretation
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Mike Coffin for further information.

Closing Date

30th March 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Kerguelen Plateau and Broken Ridge large igneous province (LIP) in the southern Indian Ocean formed contiguously by massive mafic volcanism in Early to mid-Cretaceous time. The project will illuminate rifting, breakup, and separation mechanisms and processes of these oceanic end-members, using plate kinematic and geodynamic modelling. The project involves participating in a 59-day voyage in early 2020 aboard the research vessel (RV) Investigator during which the data will be acquired.

Eligibility
  • A desire to undertake marine geoscientific fieldwork
  • Marine geoscientific research voyage experience
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geophysics or geosciences
  • Familiarity with plate kinematic and geodynamic modelling
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jo Whittaker for further information.

Closing Date

31st January 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In much of the ocean, primary productivity, the uptake of carbon by the ocean, and the health of the entire ecosystem is limited by the availability of iron. Dust deposition is considered to be an important source of iron. However, the evidence for a link between dust deposition and biological productivity is surprisingly thin, despite a long-standing paradigm that dust drives productivity. This absence of evidence may reflect an underlying overestimation of the importance of dust in driving marine productivity. Conversely, it may reflect limitations in our ability to measure or model dust deposition to the ocean, or the biological response.

This project will use data from a suite of instrumented robotic floats to test the link between dust deposition and ocean productivity across the Southern Ocean, at episodic to seasonal to inter-annual time scales.

Eligibility
  • Undergraduate degree in Science Technology Engineering or Mathematics (STEM), with a strong quantitative focus
  • Programming in Matlab or Python; experience handling large datasets
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their prior research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Peter Strutton for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Marine phytoplankton grow in association with their own bacterial communities –  microbiomes –that are critical for their growth and physiology. Isolation/culture of algal cells results in depletion, disturbance or imbalance of their unique microbiomes (dysbiosis), reduced growth, unreliable biomass production, and often death. In contrast, retaining balanced microbiomes improves algal growth rate and biomass production and optimise biochemical/nutritional composition for aquaculture and biotechnology.

A PhD opportunity is open for a talented graduate to examine the diversity and function of marine haptophyte microbiomes. The project aims to determine how microbiome structure/composition modifies growth and physiology of haptophytes, and to engineer micr0biomes– construct synthetic microbiomes to optimise productivity of haptophytes such as Isochrysis, Tisochrysis and Diachronema.  The project combines NGS-based microbial community profiling, transcriptomics and culture-based approaches to examine host-functional responses, and construct/test synthetic engineered microbiomes of key haptophyte species used in aquaculture and biotechnology.  The project will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and CSIRO Marine Research Laboratories in Hobart. The project is supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch (IMAS) and Anusysa Willis (CSIRO), and Kelli Anderson (IMAS) and Dr Heroen Verbruggen (Univ. Melbourne).

Essential skills/experience

Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in molecular biology and/or microbiology are encouraged to apply. Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships.

Desirable skills/experience

Candidates with strong computing skills and experience of collecting and analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably.

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Christopher Bolch at chris.bolch@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

1st October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Changes in Southern Ocean circulation has major consequences for the global redistribution of heat and nutrients, and ocean-driven melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Traditional paleoceanographic proxy methods for recording past changes in ocean circulation proximal to Antarctica are limited by the lack of foraminifera preserved in sediment cores. This project will investigate the use of relic barnacle shells as high-resolution archives of inter-annual variations in ocean chemistry and water mass composition. State-of the-art laser ablation analyses of trace metals and discrete analyses of carbon and oxygen, as well as neodymium isotopes will be applied to a suite of samples from the Ross Sea and southwest Pacific Ocean.

Eligibility
  • A strong background in chemistry
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Experience in trace metal and/or isotope geochemistry applied
  • Background in oceanography or geology are desirable

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Taryn Noble for further information.

Closing Date

20th March 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will focus on idealised ocean model simulations to test how continental breakup, and the resulting change in width and depth of seaways, and their position relative to wind and buoyancy forcing, affects ocean circulation. This will provide a mechanistic understanding of the effect of the opening of seaways on the climate system. This PhD project is part of a recently funded ARC Discovery Project, and the PhD researcher will have the opportunity to collaborate with the chief investigators, postdocs, and other PhD students involved.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Selection Criteria
  • Essential skills/experience: Honours (or equivalent) or Master's degree in physics, maths, engineering, physical oceanography, meteorology or related geophysical disciplines.
  • Solid mathematical skills, particular in regards to partial differential equations and linear algebra.
  • Basic programming skills (UNIX/Linux operating systems and scripting languages, Python, Matlab, etc.).
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Andreas Klocker for further information.

Closing Date

8th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Significant quantities of plastic debris pollute nearly all the world’s ecosystems, where it persists for decades. Much of the focus has been on the considerable threat posed to flora and fauna, with little information on techniques to mitigate harm to tourism or other industries, particularly on remote islands where debris often accumulates.

The PhD candidate will investigate examples of successful waste mitigation, and oceanographic factors influencing debris accumulation rates, and new development/tourisms opportunities that will enable remote island communities to manage and adapt to changing conditions. The candidate will benefit from existing stakeholder and community networks to identify and prioritise mitigation options while being supported by a diverse supervisory team.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in environmental science
  • High level oral and written communication skills including at least one publication in an international, peer-reviewed journal
  • Ability to work independently and as a productive member of a team
  • Experience in applied research, working with the community, government, or in natural resource management
  • Detailed knowledge of oceanography or engineering systems
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, conference presentations, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant work experience, and referee’s reports

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jennifer Lavers for further information.

Closing Date

1st July 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will focus on understanding of the energetics of mesoscale eddies in the East Australian Current region, with an emphasis on the energy routes to dissipation and mixing, and the eddy contribution to the shelf-open ocean exchange of tracers, using a fine-resolution, regional model of the EAC region.

Eligibility
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Strong background in Mathematics and Physics. Matlab or Python coding experience.
  • Ocean model development, experiments, and model output analysis
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Maxim Nikurashin for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on the distribution of marine plastics in Antarctic sea ice. The candidate will analyse plastics in archived and new ice cores collected around Antarctica to evaluate the spatial and seasonal patterns, if any, in the samples. Additional work will be conducted in the home laboratory to quantify the mechanisms of plastics incorporation during sea ice formation, using both a sea-ice tank and modelling approaches. Work is envisage with SCRIPPS advisors to evaluate the bioaccumulation and toxicology of microplastics through the polar food-web, from algae, to zooplankton and marine mammals.

Essential skills/experience

  • An undergraduate degree plus Honours or Masters that includes marine biology and chemistry
  • Experience with laboratory-based work, programming for data analysis
  • Strong written and oral communication skills

Desirable skills/experience

  • Familiarity with plastics or sea-ice biogeochemistry

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Delphine Lannuzel at delphine.lannuzel@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

3rd August 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctic marine ecosystems provide ecosystem services that are important on a global sale, and there is a strong imperative to understand and predict the responses of these systems and services to current and future climate change. An implementation of the Atlantis end to end ecosystem model has been developed for the East Antarctic region, and is well suited to exploring scenarios to evaluate potential climate change impacts on ecosystem structure and functions.

In this project, the successful candidate will work with modelling experts to complete the calibration of the East Antarctic Atlantis model, and to use the calibrated model to explore simple scenarios for ecosystem change. In the second part of the project, the candidate will update representations of sea ice and ice-dependent species in the model, and consider more detailed scenarios for change in sea ice habitats.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or masters equivalent research in science mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming and quantitative ecology and knowledge of marine ecosystems
  • Experience with C and R programming languages, ecosystem modelling, knowledge of Antarctic marine ecosystem and climate change

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis or entry research degree and institution, prior peer review publication, academic awards, project specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee reports and supervisor support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jess Melbourne-Thomas for further information.

Closing Date

21st February 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Many taxa that are key components of benthic Antarctic ecosystems are long-lived, have slow growth rates and low productivity. These qualities make them vulnerable to the impacts of fishing and other activities and collectively these taxa form Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VMEs). VMEs are the subject of targeted management actions. However, the distribution of VME taxa on the Antarctic continental shelf is poorly known, in part due to the sparsity of observations. This has consequences for their management as potentially detrimental activities are currently only restricted after VME taxa have are detected.

This project will use a circumpolar collation of marine imagery and environmental data coupled with state-of-art species distribution models to quantify and predict the location of VME taxa and VMEs on the Antarctic continental shelf, quantify their contribution to benthic system, assess current protection and risk and distil recommendations for policy. The project is anticipated to provide outputs that will feed into management strategies.

Eligibility
  • Strong quantitative skills, coding experience (preferably in R), background in ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Nicole Hill for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019 

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Tasmania is experiencing escalated development of its coastal regions, with greater use of coastal waters for industry and recreational activities, as well as the value placed on the pristine nature of our coasts.

A greater understanding of community values regarding the marine environment is required so that increased seafood production and marine-based livelihoods can be generated from a public resource to meet the needs of current and future generations. In addition, procedural justice is a key component underpinning conflict in this arena. It is not enough purely to understand community values, it is imperative to understand how such values can be incorporated into a ‘just’ decision-making process.

This project will use the Tasmanian coast as a case study to investigate potential means by which to incorporate natural resource values into public decision-making processes relating to commons-resource use.

Eligibility
  • Applicants should have a first-class Honours degree or equivalent qualifications in human geography/natural resource management/social sciences/political sciences/environmental science
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • High level oral and written communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and as a productive member of a team
  • Experience in applied research, working with industry, government or in natural resource management
  • Publications in highly-ranked international peer-reviewed journals
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Karen Alexander for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Spiny lobsters are one of the world’s most valuable seafood commodities making them an attractive candidate for aquaculture. They have many favourable biological features, however to date commercial scale aquaculture has not been possible due to major bottlenecks during the larval phase of development. Project supervision will be provided by leading experts from IMAS and the School of Engineering.

The PhD project will develop hardware and software for capturing, processing and analysing images and then apply it to interpret and determine key elements of lobster larval (phyllosoma) morphology and physiology. The process of image recognition for phyllosoma will be a challenging goal as phyllosoma are small (1.5 – 30 mm, total length) and transparent with minimal body thickness. Key phyllosoma features such as eyes, antennas, legs and body are discernible, however the orientation and position of the animals and limbs will vary in water. The rapid assessment and documentation of stage specific morphological characteristics associated with the complex larval life-history has never before been studied in such detail. The technology will be applied to identify feed ingestion during culture and experimentally, the duration to satiation, optimising feeding regimes, health monitoring, moult events, and pre-metamorphosis phyllosoma.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international applicants. Preference will be given to applicants who can commence in 2019
  • The PhD study must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must hold a degree from a Recognised Tertiary Institution as being in the appropriate discipline and equivalent to: - A Bachelor Honours degree of at least second class upper standard with a Minimum Research Component - A Masters of Research Degree with a Minimum Research Component - A Masters Degree (Coursework) or Graduate Diploma with a Minimum Research Component.
  • Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to provide: IELTS with Minimum Overall Score of 6.5, while achieved 6.5 for writing and speaking and no other band less than 6.0 (academic module), or TOEFL with Minimum Overall Score of 92, while achieved 26 for writing and speaking, and 20 for reading and listening, or PTE Academic with Minimum Overall Score of 58, while achieved 58 for writing and speaking with no other score lower than 50

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Alan Henderson for further information.

Closing Date

28th April 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Input from rivers and estuarine exchange on to the continental shelf plays an important role in altering physical, biogeochemical and ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. This input may influence stratification, nutrient flux, and local circulation patterns altering lower trophic levels and primary productivity. While previous studies have addressed general aspects of the structure and dynamics of river plumes, most of this work has focused on plumes formed by large and medium-size rivers. Little attention has been paid to small rivers plumes and estuarine exchange, largely because small plumes and estuarine exchange is highly dynamic and varies across short temporal (of order of hours) and spatial scales (1-10kms). This variability hinders precise measurements of plume structure and content even though small rivers influxes of fluvial water and suspended sediments is estimated at about 25% and 40%, respectively (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Milliman et al.,1999).

This project aims to advance our understanding of the role of small river plumes and estuarine exchange in driving the ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. Given the highly dynamic nature of small plumes, this work will employ a multidisciplinary approach encompassing satellite remote sensing and in situ/adaptive sampling with autonomous underwater vehicles to develop high-frequency, high-resolution, 3D sampling of the physical chemical and biological variables of plume structure and content.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of bio-optical modelling, remote sensing algorithm development and hydrodynamic modelling
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

1st September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctic seabirds are susceptible to a range of influences at and near their breeding sites during the summer months, and across their extensive winter migratory ranges. Identifying how changes in marine and terrestrial habitats will effect seabirds will aid in their conservation.

This project will investigate the relationship between snow petrels and their environment using seabird foraging, at-sea, and breeding habitat observations and physical characteristics of the environment including sea-ice and wind field data. Data will be used to establish species-environment links and projected in line with CMIP6 climate model output to predict population changes in the future. Analyses will initially use statistical methods to identify key environmental factors that likely influence their distribution and abundance.

The snow petrel is an iconic species breeding in ice-free areas around the Antarctic continent. They feed primarily on fish and krill in the loose pack ice within reach of their colonies. Nesting locations are governed by their distance and access to productive feeding grounds as well as the availability of suitable cavities. Snow petrel performance is linked to regional sea ice concentration and extent through their dependence on sea-ice for foraging and the association between sea-ice and krill. Their main prey, Antarctic krill, depend on sea ice for their winter food supply and are the focus of a large fishery which make snow petrels an important indicator of ecosystem change.

Eligibility
  • An understanding of ocean and/or seabird ecology and ecosystem dynamics
  • Strong quantitative skills, Experience with analysis software such as Matlab, R, Python or GIS
  • An understanding of oceanographic fundamentals, An ability to work at sea, Ocean-going fieldwork experience focusing on bird observations
  • Experience/understanding of Southern Ocean birdlife Field work experience , Ability or capacity to develop the ability to work with complex datasets or model output

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stuart Corney for further information.

Closing Date

1st September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The physical environment of the Southern Ocean is already experiencing many changes due to the impacts of climate change, including overall warming and freshening, and regional hotspots of warming where climate change is manifesting more rapidly than the global mean. These changes include a decrease in sea ice extent and duration, intensified warming, as well as possible increases in variability.  

This project will use ocean-sea ice model output to investigate properties and quantify changes in sea ice over the past 60 years, with a specific focus on how those changes are likely to impact upon key Southern Ocean species (such as Antarctic krill, penguins, seals and whales) and the ecosystem as a whole.

Eligibility
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Experience with ocean or climate model output
  • Experience with programming languages and analysis software such as python and Matlab
  • Understanding of the Southern Ocean marine-ecosystem
  • Understanding of sea ice formation and processes

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stuart Corney for further information.

Closing Date

3rd December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will apply a suit of geochemical methods to quantify the amount of dust-borne iron reaching the Southern Ocean around Australia. In one third of the global ocean, the growth of phytoplankton is limited by the availability of iron, an essential trace nutrient (Moore et al. 2004). Mineral dust is an important source of iron to the ocean, supplying up to 50% of the iron to support phytoplankton growth in iron-limited regions (Okin et al. 2011).

The Southern Ocean is the largest and climatically most important iron limited region, being responsible for 35 to 40% of total CO2 uptake by the ocean (Landschutzer et al. 2015). In-situ iron fertilization experiments in the Southern Ocean clearly demonstrate the potential for external iron inputs, including dust, to stimulate productivity and carbon uptake in the Southern Ocean (Boyd et al. 2000).

Despite its importance, dust deposition to the ocean has been determined directly at only a handful of locations. Following the approach of Anderson et al (2016), this project will use geochemical methods based on the measurement of thorium isotopes and trace metals in aerosols, seawater, particles and sediment in four regions east and south of Australia. This project focuses on the analysis of samples already in-hand and interpretation of results, but there will also be an opportunity to go to sea.

Eligibility
  • This project involves a large component of sample analysis using advanced analytical methods requiring careful attention detail. The ideal candidate will have a background in chemistry, oceanography, earth science, or a closely related field, with research experience in analytical chemistry, chemical oceanography, geochemistry or a closely related field
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Prior experience working in a clean laboratory, using ICP-MS and/or chromatographic separation, is desirable
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zanna Chase for further information.

Closing Date

30th December 2019

  • Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their application as soon as possible.
  • Applicants wishing to commence candidature in early 2019 should complete the Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application processes as soon as possible.
The Research Project

This project will develop portable analytical technology for the in-field measurement of soil chemistry. By using a 3D printer, devices will be rapidly prototyped and then produced in sufficient volume for field evaluation to obtain crucial data on the usability. A rapid design/use cycle will accelerate the development of a low-cost and practical device for in-field measurement of soil chemistry that can be used by environmental consultants, farmers and home gardeners.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Analytical and/or soil chemistry
  • 3D printing and/or microfabrication
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Prof. Michael Breadmore, School of Natural Sciences (Chemistry), for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is focused on designing and engineering novel transition metal-based catalysts to establish unprecedented chemical reactions. The potential of these processes to establish new modes of small molecule activation and develop novel synthetic methodology will be explored. The results of this project may lead to the establishment of new strategies for the rapid and direct synthesis of important classes of organic molecules, including natural products and their derivatives.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Organic synthesis
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project involves the screening of endemic Tasmanian plants to discover new and valuable compounds that can be used to lead drug discovery. By employing a practical pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) method developed in-house, a range of plants will be extensively screened to determine their chemical profiles. The identification of plants containing significant quantities of organic molecules that can facilitate semi-synthesis and/ or feature chemotaxonomic value will also be pursued.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Synthetic organic chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Structural characterisation techniques including NMR, IR and MSA

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

For protein identifications, the high-resolution separation techniques such as capillary electrophoresis (CE) and liquid chromatography (LC) are coupled with the powerful detector of mass spectrometry (MS) that is equipped with an electrospray ionisation interface (ESI).  Sample preparation is key to achieving high protein coverage or identification for CE-ESI-MS and LC-ESI-MS.  This project will develop new sample preparation techniques to improve protein identifications.

Eligibility
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Background in analytical chemistry and/or proteomics
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Lito Quirino for further information.

Closing Date

24th October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will develop the analytical methodologies using (and removal) surfactants for improved analytical detection of proteins, molecular aggregation of surfactants to form stationary pseudophases for open-tubular liquid chromatography and electrochromatography, and pseudophases for extraction (pseudophase microextraction).  These new techniques will increase our ability to detect and quantify important chemical species in biological and environmental samples.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following discipline are eligible to apply:

  • Chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Lito Quirino for further information.

Closing Date

1st May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In October 2020, the RV Investigator will collect sediment cores at Havre, Macauley and Healy silicic submarine caldera volcanoes in the Kermadec arc. The project aims at understanding the behaviour of submarine volcanism during silicic caldera-forming eruptions. This fantastic project will include analysis of pre-existing cores and new cores collected during the 2020 voyage. The student will be part of the research voyage (1 month at sea) and carry out research in collaboration with our international research team. This research will include core logging, stratigraphic correlations, analysis of volcanic textures, pumice density and vesicularity, and flume experiments.

Eligibility
  • Experience in volcanology and sedimentology
  • Experience in analysis of volcanic textures
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work as part of a research team and individually

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

29 February 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Expedition SO255 dredged the seafloor of the Kermadec intra-oceanic arc and back-arc at multiple locations over >130,000 km2, retrieving pumice and volcanic ash from the shallow seafloor. This project will address dispersal and sediment transport processes from submarine and subaerial silicic volcanism at the scale of an arc. The PhD student will conduct LA-ICP-MS chemical fingerprinting of the volcanic glass and crystals collected during SO255, and compare this data with existing geochemical databases. The style of transport (aerial, as floatsam, or fully underwater) will be inferred using the clast's physical characteristics and the extent of their dispersal. Floatsam dispersion by surface ocean currents will be calculated using oceanic models.

This project has large implications on regional sediment provenance, but also on geochemistry and petrology of submarine arc volcanism in general. This project is partly linked to the 2012 deep submarine eruption of Havre, and is likely to be merged with future volcanology projects in the Kermadec arc, including participation to a voyage in 2020.

The student would be part of the dynamic Submarine Volcanism Group at the University of Tasmania, and would benefit from a large panel of experts in CODES and Earth Sciences in general.

Eligibility

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Earth Sciences
  • Geoscience
  • Marine Geoscience
  • Geochemistry
  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Authorship in a published peer-reviewed research paper
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Interest/experience in laboratory/research voyage
  • Ability to work as part of a research team / individually / as appropriate to project
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

1st May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project will identify geological and geochemical vectors toward gold mineralisation in the Northern Pataz district, Peru.  The project will integrate on-site geological fieldwork in remote areas and at high altitude. The student will analyse vein texture, and geochemical analyses will include pXRF, XRD, SWIR, LA- ICP-MS, and S isotopes to characterise mineralisation and alteration overprinted by greenschist metamorphism. The student will be part of the world-renown Centre for Ore Deposit and Earth Sciences (CODES) and the dynamic Volcanology Group at the University of Tasmania, and will work closely with another student which project focusses on volcanic architecture and facies analysis of the host rock.

Eligibility
  • Experience in ore deposits, mineralisation and alteration
  • Experience of fieldwork in remote, high-altitude areas
  • Ability to work as part of a research team and individually
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Skills in Spanish would be an advantage

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Volcanology
  • Geology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

There is a living allowance scholarship for up to $32,000 p.a. for this Masters of Research (MRes) project, co-funded by the CRC ORE and CODES for 2 years with no extension, that will be considered for an outstanding applicant.

The Research Project

This project will investigate the specific controls on grade by size fractionation in base metal deposits. The project will integrate site data (core logging etc) and laboratory data (hyperspectral logging, hardness measurements, mineralogy etc). The challenge is to recognise what aspects of ore mineralogy and texture lead to the development of significant grade by size fractionation. The aim is a predictive understanding of the processes driving responses in drill core tests and bulk samples in order to aid the recognition of suitable rock masses for grade engineering.

The student will be part of the world-renown Centre for Ore Deposit and Earth Sciences (CODES) at the University of Tasmania, and the Cooperative Research Centre for Optimising Resource Extraction (CRC ORE; https://www.crcore.org.au/ ) Grade Engineering Program. This project complements one that focuses on controls on grade by size fractionation in precious metal deposits.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geology, geometallurgy, computer science or a related subject
  • Drill core analysis
  • Data analytics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Scholarship Assessment Criteria

In addition to educational criteria the following will be used to assess candidates:

  • Field experience including detailed logging and analysis of drill core
  • Familiarity with geological-type software: e.g. ioGas, leapfrog
  • Familiarity with data analytical software and programming software
  • Demonstrated ability to work as part of a multi disciplinary team
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Julie Hunt for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on the economic geology potential of a relatively less explored part of the Asia-Pacific region. The candidate will combine furthering the understanding of the regional tectonics and geological setting with a more detailed study of orogenic gold deposit formation in Central Myanmar.

The project will combine field geology with advanced geochemical analytics using the facilities in Earth Sciences/CODES at UTAS.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Broad-based geology
  • Economic geology
  • Geochemistry and analytical experience

More Information

Please contact Professor Khin Zaw for more information.

Closing Date

1st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Halogens are key elements in hydrothermal systems that play a role in metal transport, and may form a substantial mass of the hydrothermal fluid. During mineral processing, excessive concentrations of fluorine in minerals can present a problem and reduce the value of ore concentrates. Despite their importance, halogens are rarely measured in geochemical studies of hydrothermal ore deposits, and their partitioning and behaviour during hydrothermal alteration is relatively poorly understood.

This PhD study will firstly seek to develop new methods for measuring the concentrations of F, Cl, Br and I to low concentrations in hydrothermally altered rocks and hydrothermal minerals, using a combination of "wet" chemical methods (pyrohydrolysis followed by Ion chromatography and ICPMS) as well as electron beam and laser ablation ICPMS methods. The developed methods will then be applied to samples collected from various ore deposit environments to measure halogen concentrations and understand the deportment of halogens within different minerals.

This project would suit a student with a strong background in analytical chemistry and/or analytical geochemistry, with an interest in applying their methodological expertise to solve real world geochemical problems. The successful candidate will work with world-leading experts on analytical geochemistry and hydrothermal ore deposits in the Centre for Ore Deposits and Earth Sciences (CODES) and be able to access cutting edge UTAS research facilities within CODES Analytical Laboratories, the Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science (ACROSS) and the Central Science Laboratory (CSL).

Eligibility
  • Experience with laser ablation ICPMS, EPMA or other microbeam techniques
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in analytical chemistry or geochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Shaun Barker for further information.

Closing Date

1st May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In early 2019, IODP expedition 379 in the Amundsen sea (offshore Western Antarctica) collected hundreds of metres of cores containing Ice Rafted Debris, and possible turbidites from the Miocene to present. This project aims at identifying volcanic components within these cores and carry out geochemical analysis to infer their provenance. The student will carry out geochemical analyses on volcanic glass shards and correlate this data with existing data from other expeditions and drill cores. Particle morphology will be analysed to infer transport and depositional processes. This study will allow identification of marker beds that may be dated by U/Pb on zircons with LA-ICP-MS to further extend our understanding on the temporal stability of the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Eligibility
  • Experience in volcanology and clastic sedimentology
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work as part of a research team and individually

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Volcanology
  • Geochemistry
  • Sedimentology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

Research funds are available to support necessary costs.

The Research Project

Myanmar is long known as a country, endowed with rich mineral resources and there remains considerable potential for future exploration to identify a diverse range of commodities from tin, tungsten, copper, gold, silver, led, zinc, nickel and gemstones. The Monywa copper district in Myanmar is an high sulphidation copper deposits of Kyisintaung, Sabetaung, Sabetaung South and the much larger Letpadaung. Together these deposits have pre-mining resources totalling 2 billion tonnes of ore with over 7 million tonnes contained copper.

The aims of this project are:

  1. A chronologically ordered, well dated paragenetic sequence of host rocks, alteration styles, mineralization and veins/fracture fills
  2. Allow constraints on the nature of the ore fluids within distinct hydrothermal stages
  3. Clarify the provenance of the involved fluids
  4. Finally, in the light of the newly obtained data, the geological and geochemical characteristics of Cu-Au mineralization of the Monywa-Popa-Wuntho area will be compared and contrasted with other high sulfidation epithermal deposits in the world

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied geology
  • Programming skills

More information

Please contact Professor Khin Zaw for more information.

Closing Date

1st May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project aims at characterising volcanic architecture through facies analysis of outcrops and cores in a gold-mineralised prospect in Northern Pataz District, Peru. The project will integrate on-site geological fieldwork in remote areas and at high altitude. The project focusses on analysis of coherent and volcaniclastic textures, structures, and geochemistry of the volcanic host dated as Mississipian age..  The student will be part of the world-renown Centre for Ore Deposit and Earth Sciences (CODES) and the dynamic Volcanology Group at the University of Tasmania. The student will work closely with another student which project focusses on ore mineralisation and alteration.

Eligibility
  • Experience in analysis and description of volcanic textures
  • Experience of fieldwork in remote, high-altitude areas
  • Ability to work as part of a research team and individually
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Skills in Spanish would be an advantage

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Volcanology
  • Economic geology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

A critical and first step component of hydrothermal ore discovery is volcanic facies analysis, so that the geological context of ore deposits within a volcanic setting can be established. This project will improve discovery of ore deposits in Australia by combining traditional facies analysis approaches with the development of a novel, automated image-analysis statistical technique, which will permit the characterisation of individual volcanic units in terms of their crystal size distribution⎯and in an unbiased way.

Crystals are ubiquitous in most volcanic rocks and therefore an excellent feature to be used as primary identifier. Outputs from these techniques will be combined with structural reconstructions and chemical analyses to infer stratigraphic and petrogenetic relationships. This project will reconstruct the volcanic architecture hosting hydrothermal ore deposits at a regional scale, and identify the structural and stratigraphic controls on mineralisation.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Economic Geology
  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology
  • Geology
  • Geophysics
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed against the following criteria:

  • Number and quality of publications
  • Referee reports
  • Past work experience in volcanology/sedimentology or economic geology
  • Willingness to work in the field for long periods of time
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rebecca Carey for further information.

Closing Date

12th October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Active glacier processes are amongst the most significant controls on how ice sheets contribute to the rate of sea level rise.  This project is part of a wider initiative to generate new knowledge about active glaciers and, ultimately, recommendations for cost-effective future glacier monitoring in East Antarctica. This project aims to identify active glacier processes such as crevassing, iceberg calving and the slip of ice over rock, and map these events in time-evolving 3D.  The research will progress innovative research techniques that use machine learning and/and or computer simulation applied to seismic records.

The research will involve working with large volumes of seismic data recorded close to active glaciers in multiple locations worldwide.  Depending on the interests areas of the applicant, the project will either focus on understanding glacier deformation processes using machine learning techniques applied to seismic records, or mathematical modelling of a subset of active glacier processes.  The research will be based in Physics at UTAS, with strong links to researchers at IMAS and hence the opportunity to use physics, mathematics and computing to progress interdisciplinary research for the polar regions.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Physics
  • Applied mathematics
  • Geophysics
  • Quantitative computational subjects

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Interest/experience in global environmental research topics
  • Interest/experience in data handling and computer programming
  • Interest/experience in working as part of an interdisciplinary research team
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Anya Reading for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will explore novel algebraic methods for calculating evolutionary distances between organisms with circular genomes (e.g. bacteria). The focus of the project is applications of group representation theory to finding computationally efficient approximations to the likelihood function under a given model of genome rearrangement. Several avenues for this are available, including the inclusion of random representations, including only the most influential eigenvalues, approximating matrix elements, and exploring Kronecker product constructions of irreducible representations.

Applicants should have a degree in mathematics (or equivalent), as well as interest in applications to evolutionary biology. Some knowledge of abstract algebra and strong programming skills are highly desirable. Although the project is primarily theoretical in focus, there is scope to apply the results to real molecular data sets.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics or a related subject
  • Demonstrated knowledge of abstract algebra
  • Programming knowledge and experience
  • Demonstrated interest in molecular biology and/or bioinformatic (phylogenetics in particular)
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jeremy Sumner for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Many galaxy properties, including mass, star formation history and morphology, are correlated with their environments. The properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) hosted by these galaxies are similarly sensitive to where the galaxy finds itself. For example, powerful radio AGN, produced by relativistic jet launching by a combination of spin and accretion onto a supermassive black hole, are found overwhelmingly in galaxy groups and clusters. Interpreting the observable properties of radio AGN is important for quantifying the amount of feedback these objects do on their host galaxies and beyond, yet this too depends on knowledge of the environment into which the jets are propagating.

GAMA Legacy ATCA Southern Survey (GLASS) is a 3000-hour Legacy survey on the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Australia's premier radio astronomy instrument. GLASS conducts sensitive observations of 50 square degrees of the sky at 5.5 and 9.5 GHz. A key feature of GLASS is availability of environment measures through deep optical group catalogues covering the survey field. The two main science goals are to measure the demographics of Active Galactic Nuclei and star forming galaxies in both the nearby and high-redshift Universe, as a function of environment.

This PhD project will focus on imaging GLASS data, and constructing catalogues of radio sources and their host galaxies across a wide range of radio, optical and infra-red wavelengths, for a complete census of AGN, star forming galaxies, and their environments. For an interested student, an AGN modeling component using the UTAS-developed RAiSE dynamical model is also a possibility. This project will be performed in collaboration with colleagues CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science.

Eligibility
  • Open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject
  • Familiarity with radio astronomy techniques and/or analytical modelling
  • Coding experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stas Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The evolution of galaxies over cosmic time is influenced by factors such as environment, interactions, AGN feedback and star formation. We are using a powerful new tracer to investigate nearby starburst galaxies, where large-scale processes are driving the rapid formation of large numbers of stars.

In order to better understand the factors which cause enhanced star formation rates in starburst galaxies we need to form a holistic picture of the process, which includes the dense molecular gas that acts as the fuel. We have recently discovered a new type of methanol maser, associated with the molecular gas in the central regions of starburst galaxies and the primary purpose of this project is to improve our understanding of these masers, in order to determine how they relate to the starburst phenomenon.

This project will involve utilising world-class radio and millimetre interferometers, such as the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Jansky Very Large Array and the Atacama Large Millimetre Array to make sensitive, high-resolution observations of methanol maser transitions and range of other molecular tracers.  These data will be used to better understand the physical conditions in the regions where the maser arise and how these relate to large-scale dynamical and chemical processes within the host galaxy, with the overall aim of providing a new tool to help understand the causes of starbursts and its relation to the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Experience in Radio interferometry is highly desirable.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject.

More Information

Please contact Simon Ellingsen for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

One of the six ‘big questions’ posed in the 2016 Decadal Plan for Australian Astronomy: How do stars and planetary systems form? This PhD project will directly address this fundamental question.

The University of Tasmania is collaborating in a “Legacy” science project being undertaken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) that is building on Australia’s rich tradition of spectral line legacy surveys to deliver a 7-mm dense gas survey of the Fourth Quadrant Galactic Plane in multiple molecular spectral lines and continuum emission. This will address a wide range of astrophysical challenges, including directly testing competing theories of massive star formation and mapping the dense gas structure of the Milky Way through to the far side of the Disk.  By locking in key measurements in our "astronomical backyard", the project will provide a crucial astrophysical template that will allow us to interpret future sensitive, high-resolution surveys of external galaxies with ALMA and the SKA.

This project will involve utilising the Australia Telescope Compact Array to make sensitive, high-resolution observations of the dense-gas molecular tracer CS, along with methanol masers and range of other molecular tracers.  These data will be used to obtain a census of high-mass star forming regions (through CS, SiO, methanol masers and radio continuum observations) and directly test theoretical predictions of high-mass star formation and their precursors, feeding directly into future work on high-mass star formation.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Experience in Radio interferometry is highly desirable.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject.

More Information

Please contact Simon Ellingsen for more information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Over the last decade, the models used to infer evolutionary relationships have become increasingly complex as larger data sets become available and increased computing power makes optimisation of complex models more feasible.  Models of DNA sequence evolution contain both structural aspects (e.g. tree topology) as well as continuous parameters (rates of nucleotide substitution, edge  lengths). Currently a popular way to choose between models is using the likelihood based Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), however it is not clear if the assumptions behind the AIC are met in the scenarios to which it is applied.

Assessing absolute goodness-of-fit of phylogenetic models is also a very challenging statistical problem as the inherent high-dimensionality of sequence data makes it difficult to visualize model-fit (i.e. there is no easy equivalent of linear regression residual diagnostics).

This project is aimed at a candidate with a strong statistical background and an interest in developing the field of statistical phylogenetics.

Eligibility
  • Open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Background and skills in statistics or a related area is required

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Statistics (or related disciplines)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Barbara Holland for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

It may seem odd to compare black holes to thermostats, yet mounting evidence suggests this is precisely their role in galactic ecosystems. The Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) phenomenon in galaxies is intermittent, but the drivers of both the triggering and cessation of black hole activity are not yet well constrained. One clue lies in the different environments inhabited by fast, powerful jets, and their slower, less powerful counterparts. These two types of jets also impart very different types of feedback on the surrounding gas, and hence understanding their origins is important to galaxy formation and evolution studies. Recently, it has been hypothesized that low-power jets are disrupted due to the slowing down of the jet by external gas and/or star formation in the jets' host galaxy.

This project aims to test this hypothesis by combining state-of-the-art jet and galaxy formation models. The project will use the PLUTO astrophysical fluids code to simulate the propagation of jets with different properties in a range of environments. In each case, predictions will be made for both the efficiency of jet feedback, and observable properties of jet-inflated structures. Model predictions will be confronted with observational data from leading Australian and international projects. This project will be performed in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Hertfordshire and the ASTRO-3D ARC Centre of Excellence in All-Sky Astrophysics.

Eligibility
  • Open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class or second upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject
  • Familiarity with numerical simulations, analytical modelling and/or astronomy techniques
  • Coding experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Stas Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Under contract with Geoscience Australia, UTAS operates a continent-wide network of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes. Our antennas in Katherine (NT), Yarragadee (WA) and Hobart (TAS) contribute to measuring global reference frames and Earth orientation.

VLBI observations to satellites have the aim of improved space ties, meaning to better connect VLBI and GPS in establishing the most precise coordinate system of the Earth. The University of Tasmania is leading efforts towards realising this exciting new observing technique, supported by the Australian Research Council with project funds and a PhD scholarship.

This project includes work on VLBI observations to satellites and spacecraft, perform the observations, process the data and analyse results. The candidate should resolve current issues with signal strengths and receiver characteristics and develop new processing chains, in order to exceed current accuracies.

The successful candidate should be prepared to work in developing existing programs and software, as well as responsibly use the University’s radio telescopes. She/he is expected to perform independent research, assisted by the supervisory team. The project further offers the opportunity to take an active role in supporting daily operations as part of a global telescope network.

Eligibility

Candidates from a variety of disciplines backgrounds are eligible to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosciences
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Selection Criteria
  • Education in geodesy and spatial sciences.
  • Familiarity with space geodetic techniques.
  • Education in Physics or Astronomy.
  • Knowledge of Linux and good programming/software skills.
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Guifre Molera Calves for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Markov-modulated fluid queues, in which the amount of customers/data in a buffer is modelled using a continuous variable, have been studied extensively via matrix-analytic methods. In the analysis of networks of fluid queues however, the results for a few special two-node cases could only be obtained. However, the operator-analytic methods, a generalization of the matrix-analytic methods for single queues, is a promising approach that could lead to novel numerical schemes.

An example is a system of two fluid queues, with contents that are being driven by a background Markov chain in such a way that the content of the second queue also depends on the content of the first queue. The main questions in this context are: (i) how complex can we allow such models to be, while still being able to find the joint stationary distribution, and (ii) what approximations can be devised in cases where analytic solutions are not possible.

This project will focus on theory and algorithms for the analysis of stochastic fluid networks, and is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the advancements in this field. You will work on simulations, theoretical models, and algorithms.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong technical, research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required.
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject.
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Malgorzata O'Reilly, for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on developing stochastic models for the analysis of health care systems. and is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the improvement of the management of health care systems. We aim to develop of a suite of algorithmic techniques and make the code publicly available to the research community.

You will work on simulation and/or theoretical models using statistical analysis of real data. You will have an opportunity to be part of a rich collaborative environment and interact with mathematicians and clinicians involved in health care modelling.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong technical, research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required.
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject.
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Malgorzata O'Reilly, for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In populations of endangered species, management strategies referred to as genetic rescue have been advocated in order to help avoid extinction. An example of considerable concern in the Australian context is the conservation management of Tasmanian Devils suffering from the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), which puts them in danger of extinction. Conservation strategies have been used with the hope of increasing the genetic diversity of the wild population, but this remains a challenging problem. An important factor in this context is the ability to assess the impact of conservation efforts.

This project will focus on developing models for the numerical assessment of conservation strategies, and is an exciting opportunity to help make a difference. We aim to develop of a suite of algorithmic techniques and make the code publicly available to the research community.

You will work on simulation and/or theoretical models using statistical analysis of real data. You will have an opportunity to be part of a rich collaborative environment and interact with mathematicians and biologists studying the wild populations of Tasmanian Devils.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject
  • Knowledge and skills in biological mathematics, evolutionary genetics or related area will be highly regarded

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Malgorzata O'Reilly for further information.

Closing Date

13 October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project aims to synthesise knowledge and develop seismic tools which will characterise the basement beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheets in order to provide more robust constraints for ice sheet models at basin and continental scales. Important factors including elevation, slope angle, sedimentary basins and the presence of water. A significant component of the project will be a compilation of existing seismic and other geophysical and spatial data from across East Antarctica. This will involve communication with other Antarctic nations with a significant presence in East Antarctica to form an improved GIS database. The ongoing research will then take the form of computer simulations of seismic waveforms, and a comparison to likely ice-rock scenarios beneath major ice sheets.

At UTAS the successful applicant will join one of the leading international groups that use seismology to investigate Earth environment systems. The research environment within Physics at UTAS is a vibrant and supportive place to develop geophysics, applied mathematics, and computational physics skills with real-world applications and strong links to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies. While the research for this project is computer-based, there may be opportunities to travel to Antarctica on partner projects for suitably skilled applicants.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geophysics, physics or applied mathematics or related fields
  • Experience with GIS-type computing environments and scientific computing
  • Aptitude for high-performance computing

Aptitude for interdisciplinary collaboration

More Information

For more information contact the Primary Supervisor, Professor Anya Reading, School of Natural Sciences (Physics), for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Value and Duration

This scholarship provides $27.596 (2019 rate) living allowance for 3.5 years, with no possible extension, co-funded by Auscope and College of Science and Engineering.

The Research Project

Under contract with Geoscience Australia, UTAS operates a continental-wide network of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes. Our antennas in Katherine (NT), Yarragadee (WA) and Hobart (TAS) contribute to measuring global reference frames and Earth orientation such as polar motion and the rotational speed of the Earth. The next generation VLBI Global Observing System (VGOS), comprising new broadband receivers is expected to improve the current measurement precision from the centimetre level to a few millimetres or better.  

The main research goal is the improvement of the current precision of Australian VLBI sessions from about one centimetre to the millimetre level. While the successful candidate is expected to pursue her/his independent research, testing new modes, optimising the allocated frequency bands and developing new correlation and fringe-fitting procedures are possible areas of research.The successful candidate will support the implementation of the VGOS system for the AuScope VLBI antennas and conduct Australian VGOS observations.

This project includes a lot of technical work, hence the candidate should not be afraid of using new programs. The candidate will further have an opportunity to actively test the solutions they identify through taking an active role in supporting the AuScope operations.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a Masters degree or First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • A good level of spoken and written English is necessary for this project

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Scholarship Assessment Criteria
  • Education in geodesy and spatial sciences. Familiarity with space geodetic techniques is welcome
  • Education in Physics or Astronomy
  • Experience with Linux and software development
  • Signal processing
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Lucia McCallum for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Tasmanian Convict Conduct records are internationally recognized: in 2007 they were placed on the UNESCO Memory of the World Register.  This very detailed resource includes every court encounter a convict had over the course of their sentence, between approximately 1804 and 1904.
These beautiful, hand-written documents are invaluable as they allow researchers to reconstruct a detailed history of offending and punishment in 19th Century Tasmania.  
A dedicated team of volunteers has, over several years, painstakingly digitised more than one hundred thousand of these records, but there are many more.
The transcription task is made difficult by the age of the documents, and the individual writing hand of each clerk writing them.  It will be a huge improvement to automate this transcription.

This project will develop statistical machine learning tools, using the already transcribed records as training data, to identify what was written from high resolution scans of the remaining approximately 450 thousand records.  The machine learner will exploit known structures in the documents: for example, predictable positions of dates and personal names, and particular terminology.  These features will be used to guide most likely meaning of each record, and will be validated against the already transcribed records.

Eligibility
  • The successful student for this project will have a background in mathematics or statistics, and at least a basic skill in scripting, e.g., with Python or R

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Michael Charleston for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Eucalypts are keystone species in numerous Australian ecosystems, many of which are under threat. Ecological restoration programs must maximise the capacity of regenerating ecosystems to survive and thrive in a changing climate. One consideration is the adaptive potential of the genetic material being used.

The University of Tasmania has partnered with Greening Australia to establish a series of large, long-term genetic provenance trials in the degraded agricultural landscapes of the midlands of Tasmania. Using these field trials and wild populations of native Eucalyptus species, this research project will combine computer modelling with genomic, morphometric and climate data to assess adaptive capacity of eucalypts and test seed sourcing strategies that promote survival and optimise performance of ecological restoration plantings.

This interdisciplinary project offers an excellent opportunity to contribute to real world science using advanced DNA technologies, traditional quantitative genetic and functional trait analyses, and novel computer-modelling approaches.

Eligibility
  • Experience or interest in genomics and bioinformatics
  • Experience or interest in computer modelling and R-based data analysis
  • Excellent written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a research team
  • Current driving license and a willingness to work in remote field areas
  • Applicants from the variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • First class honours (or masters by research) in a relevant field (e.g., genetics, genomics, computer modelling)
  • At least one publication in a high quality peer-reviewed scientific journal
  • Experience with coding (preferably in R)
  • A sound understanding of genetics and genomics
  • High standard of English
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dorothy Steane for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

Funding

This project includes substantial operational funds and logistical support, funded by a five year Australian Research Council (ARC) grant to Professor Barry Brook (ARC Australian Laureate Fellow).

An additional top-up award of AUD$5,000pa will also be considered for outstanding applicants.

The Research Project

The University of Tasmania has world-leading research strengths in eco-evolutionary dynamics, ecosystem science and the impacts of global change on biodiversity. This project will use a combined approach to analyse, model and forecast the impact of different drivers of land-use change on biodiversity at local to regional scales.

The PhD project will involve field work, compilation and analysis of existing information (historical and database sources), and development of new meta-modelling approaches to assess biodiversity responses. A key outcome of the research will be to help develop solutions that resolve inherent trade-offs between ongoing human development and the competing need to protect habitats, ecosystems, and species. This vexed problem is highly relevant to Tasmania (and Australia more broadly), given the newsworthy issues surrounding the need to balance the socio-economic benefits of forestry and hydropower with the natural heritage and tourism-related values embodied in its World Heritage forested lands.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that are particularly desirable and will be ranked highly include:

  • Ecological, evolutionary or conservation biology theory and practice (including fieldwork)
  • Experience in ecological modelling, programming, and/or statistical coding
  • Geographical Information Systems and Remote sensing, database management

More Information

Please contact Professor Barry Brook for more information.

Closing Date

1st March 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor (david.bowman@utas.edu.au), and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Tasmania is world-renowned for tall Eucalyptus forests. In early 2019, vast areas of forest in southern Tasmanian were burnt by very large bushfires ignited by dry lightning storms. There is great uncertainty about the ecological and broader impacts of these fires on tall wet eucalypt forests.  To understand the impact of the fires on forest trees and carbon emissions we will use a combination of remote sensing and field survey to assess the impacts of these fires. 

The study builds on permanent forest plots established at the Warra Long-Term Ecological Research site and a rare (and novel for eucalypt forest) combination of pre- and post-fire lidar surveys.  These studies are of critical importance in the development of cost-effective fire severity mapping in Eucalyptus forests, will help shape fire management policy in both Tasmania and Australia, and will contribute to global climate modeling by improving emissions estimates from eucalypt bushfires.  

The research is strongly supported by a spectrum of Tasmanian Government agencies with a stake in managing Eucalyptus forests (Tasmania Fire Service, Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment and Sustainable Timber Tasmania).  The research is supported by a Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Centre Tactical Grant.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The student will need to be physically fit and mobile to undertake field work

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in ecology, environmental sciences or geography or a related subject with experience in geographic information systems.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, David Bowman for further information.

Closing Date

30th October 2019 

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will identify areas of fire refugia in Tasmania and how these relate to one of the most precious components of the Tasmania biota: the palaeo-endemic flora. It will be built around a combination of modelling and field work and will contribute directly to the management of these important areas and plants.

The western Tasmania wilderness areas have small globally important centres for palaeo-endemic plants, including important Gondwanan relicts. The palaeo-endemics are mostly susceptible to fire and mainly persist in fire refugia: small areas of the landscape with topographic and climatic protection from fire. This project would develop a geospatial model to identify fire refugia and then link the model to the palaeo-endemics, resulting in a map to help fire managers to prioritise areas to protect in the case of wilderness fires.

Hotter and drier future climates will have a detrimental impact on fire refugia, but some areas should be more resilient in the long term. The project will therefore project the model of refugia into the future to help understand the effect of climate change on the viability of refugia. It will use reserve design prioritisation approaches to rank the fire refugia from most to least vulnerable.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector, especially ecology
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The student will need to be physically fit and mobile to undertake field work
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Quality of academic record
  • Quality of publication record
  • Experience in ecological field work
  • Expertise in ecological modelling/analysis of ecological data
  • Ability to commence in 2019
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Greg Jordan for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2019*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor (david.bowman@utas.edu.au), and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The City of Hobart, capital of the Australian island State of Tasmania, has high vulnerability to catastrophic wildfire. This risk profile reflects a constellation of biophysical and social geographic factors including a highly flammable landscape, extensive urban-bushland fringe, poor social engagement with bushfire risk, aging housing stock that is not compliant with modern bushfire building and planning codes, and pockets of socio-economic disadvantage, and under-insurance patterns that cut across low and middle Australian households.

In this project we will use a mix of qualitative and quantitative social research combined with biophysical and geospatial modelling of fire risk to assess human vulnerability to bushfire. We will contextualise this research globally by ensuring we are following comparable social and biophysical approaches that have been developed elsewhere in Australia and in North America. Our research will lead to policy recommendations to the City of Hobart to increase community and individual household resilience to bushfire. This project will develop approaches that can be applied to other Local Government Areas in Tasmania and elsewhere.

Experience and skills that will be ranked highly include:
Degree-level undergraduate education in ecology, environmental sciences or geography or a related subject; Experience in geographic information systems.

Eligibility
  • The student will need to be physically fit and mobile to undertake field work
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, David Bowman for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

Top-Up scholarship of AUD$5,000pa will be considered for outstanding applicants.

Please note that the applicant/candidate must have already been awarded a base stipend/living allowance scholarship at the RTP rate to be eligible for the top-up.

The Research Project

This project presents a rare opportunity to work in one of the world's few Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments, a cutting-edge global change manipulation experiment, located in southern Tasmania, Australia. The rising concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere should stimulate plant growth, particularly in areas that suffer from periodic water shortage, but often this doesn't occur. Our inability to explain the reasons for this lack of response prevents us from predicting global carbon balances and future agricultural productivity. This project will involve measurements in a cutting-edge global change field experiment to close this knowledge gap by examining plant growth responses to elevated CO2 during repeated drought cycles. In particular, the candidate will aim to identify the mechanisms and timescales over which past water and nutrient availability affect photosynthesis and growth responses to CO2 in grasslands, which is crucial for improving models of future plant growth and land-atmosphere interactions.

This project is fully funded by the Australian Research Council. The successful candidate will be based in the School of Natural Sciences at the University of Tasmania and jointly supervised by A/Prof. Mark Hovenden (University of Tasmania) and Dr Martin De Kauwe (University of New South Wales).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree in plant science, ecology or agricultural science or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Current vehicle drivers license

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Biology
  • Plant Science
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Science
  • Agricultural Science

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Scholarship Assessment Criteria
  • Experience with plant physiological measurements such as gas exchange, water or nutrient relations
  • Experience in making repetitive measurements in a field setting
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Mark Hovenden for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The importance of pathogens to Southern Ocean marine predators has implication not only for contemporary populations, but also their adaptations to future climate regimes. Yet, in many cases, the significance of pathogens to marine predators remains unknown.

This PhD project seeks to study the impacts and control of pathogens on marine predators, focussing primarily on the shy albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) and with potential to include other marine avifauna. Avian pox virus (Poxvirus avium) is a vector-borne pathogen likely to impact the fledgling success of shy albatross and is a target for this research, owing to many unknown aspects of transmission and absolute importance. However, opportunities also exist to explore other potential pathogens impacting shy albatross and other marine avifauna, due to a dearth of research.

This disease ecology focused PhD project will address two major themes: (1) developing a deeper understanding of pathogens and their impact of marine avifauna; and (2) evaluate disease mitigation strategies and their value for ongoing species management strategies in Tasmania and beyond. Therefore, this place-based PhD will directly feed into management to optimise research engagement and impact, the outcomes of which have international relevance for marine avifaunal conservation and climate adaptation.

Eligibility
  • The successful applicant will have strong interest, and ideally background, in marine avifauna and wildlife disease. Well-rounded applicants with who have an enthusiastic and realistic appreciation of the full suite of skills necessary to become an early career scientist (organisation, logistics, fieldwork, lab work, statistical and mathematical modelling, writing, publishing, presenting, etc.) are encouraged to apply
  • The successful applicant will be expected to demonstrate innovative thinking and problem-solving skills, and capacity to take projects from inception to publication
  • The successful applicant must also have a postgraduate qualification to be eligible for this PhD. They will join a diverse and multidisciplinary team studying a range of wildlife and disease ecology issues in Scott Carver's laboratory.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Scott Carver for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Knowledge of species' responses to past climate change can be used to predict their resilience to current and projected climate change. However, species have varying sensitivity to environmental stressors. Therefore, to identify which species track the impact of environmental change in the past, with a view to monitoring in the present and predicting the future, we must assess a variety of taxa. This project addresses a key knowledge gap for Antarctic biota by genetically assessing responses of 6 flighted seabird species to past climate change, and combining these with inferences already made for penguins and seals in a meta-analysis. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of genetic variation can also guide the selection of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas through the identification of populations that are demographically-independent, represent long-term refugia, or contain genetic (and potentially taxonomic) novelty.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • An ability to perform and interpret population genetics analyses is highly desirable

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Honours/MSc degree in population genetics or phylogenetics
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in biology
  • Interpersonal communication skills
  • Time management
  • Ability to work both independently, and as part of a team

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Dr Chris Burridge, School of Natural Sciences (Discipline of Biology), for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Some of the most important wildlife diseases are caused by environmentally transmitted parasites. Yet, solutions to remain elusive and a major frontier in disease ecology, despite decades of research. Emblematic of this broad issue is sarcoptic mange disease of wombats. Sarcoptic mange, caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is the most important disease of wombats. The parasite (introduced to Australia by European settlers and their domestic animals) causes significant animal welfare issues to wombats, and occasional local conservation issues. Owing to welfare concerns and the visible nature of diseased wombats, many individuals and community groups across Australia are attempting to manage mange disease, but significant knowledge gaps and feasibility issues limit attempts.

This disease ecology focused PhD project seeks to address these issues by tackling two major themes: (1) developing a deeper understanding of the transmission of S. scabiei, which is widely considered to occur via the suitable environment in wombat burrows; and (2) test new treatment strategies for mange control in wombats, building upon existing knowledge, modelling and empirical data generated in this thesis. Additional project directions will also be considered, dependent upon the expertise of the applicant.

Eligibility
  • The successful applicant will have strong interest, and ideally background, in wildlife disease issues and solutions to those
  • Well-rounded applicants with who have an enthusiastic and realistic appreciation of the full suite of skills necessary to become an early career scientist (organisation, logistics, fieldwork, lab work, modelling, writing, publishing, presenting, etc.) are encouraged to apply
  • The successful applicant will be expected to demonstrate innovative thinking and problem-solving skills, and capacity to take projects from inception to publication
  • The successful applicant must also have a postgraduate qualification to be eligible for this PhD. They will join a diverse and multidisciplinary team studying a range of wildlife and disease ecology issues in Scott Carver's laboratory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Scott Carver for further information.

Closing Date

27th September 2019 

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Tasmanian devil is threatened with extinction by the spread of a transmissible cancer, Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Devil populations have been dramatically decimated in up to 90% across almost the entire species range. Disease transmission is driven by social interactions and biting behaviour, which increase during the mating season with a strong feedback on individual's physiology.

In this context, behaviour, stress and immunological condition of devils are expected to interact and influence patterns of transmission and spread of DFTD within and among devil populations driving the ecology and eventual evolution of the devil-DFTD system.

This project integrates disciplines from behavioural ecology, epidemiology, veterinary sciences and social networks modelling. The successful applicant will gain/enhance skills in field-based research, laboratory techniques and quantitative modelling approaches.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Zoology
  • Veterinary

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • A good understanding of the field of ecology and background or interest in physiology and immunology
  • High level quantitative skills
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work as part of an interdisciplinary research team
  • Proven ability to work individually in remote locations including supervising volunteer field assistants. Current driving licence, prefer manual and 4WD experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Menna Jones for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

A collection of private (e.g., Electrolytic Zincworks) and government bodies (e.g., Hydro-Electric Commission) chose to build factories and stations in Tasmania due to its geographic and socioeconomic landscapes. These same factors encouraged the construction of housing for workers. Due to their inherently controlled design and construction processes and often overt ideological framing, company housing schemes offers ideal vehicles through which to interrogate design objectives including formal variety, linguistic coherence, and typological tolerance. This project will involve work in archives and in the field, analysis of texts, production of analytical drawings and other visualisations, and the generation of arguments related to rationalisation and house design. Outputs will include curated exhibitions, visual analyses, and scholarly papers.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Like many examples of its kind, the Tasmanian Department of Housing actively addressed social and economic issues in the post-war period through social housing policy. The architects and bureaucrats charged with catering for demographic shifts and increased urbanisation approached their task with strategic intent. This project will look to articulate their intent, and examine the effectiveness of their processes – both in terms of methodology and designs. It will look back at the history of social housing in post-war Tasmania with ambitions of uncovering a set of guidelines to influence current policy on affordable housing. The methodology of this project will involve archival research, and may include design–research or other social-science practices.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Green building certification systems, such as LEED for Schools and the Living Building Challenge, encourage design teams to use green buildings as educational "teaching tools." However, we have much yet to learn about the social performance of green buildings and how to engage occupants in the sustainability narrative of buildings. This project seeks to remedy that gap through understanding the mediated meanings of sustainable building features. 

Dr. Georgia Lindsay has been studying the problem using green museums in the US. Increasingly, museums are using green-building construction practices for new buildings, and some go so far as to consider the surrounding landscape as part of the museum's "collection" to be preserved. Moreover, with the growth of the Green Economy, sustainability has a cache among institutions and businesses seeking to build green branding. Science museums, especially those with green buildings, are uniquely positioned to advance architectural literacy while communicating the values of earth stewardship to the general public.

Georgia invites expressions of interest from those interested in pursuing research about how architecture communicates sustainability. Topics might include green museums in a global or Australian context, sustainability communication in building types other than museums, and how to invest architecture with legible pedagogical content.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Ability to create a compelling proposal and expression of interest
  • Background in social science or design fields
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Georgia Lindsay for further information.

Closing Date

15th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood (CSAW) at the University of Tasmania is inviting applications for a PhD scholarship to study structural design and manufacture of glue-laminated (glulam) timber elements using plantation hardwood. Your research will be affiliated with a series of eight current research and development projects based at CSAW, in Launceston, Tasmania, that have been funded via a National Institute for Forest Products Innovation (NIFPI) competitive research grants and industry support initiative.

This PhD project will focus on the potential to make and deliver efficient glulam systems for building applications using Tasmanian fibre-milled plantation hardwood. Your research will be linked to the NIFPI research project, titled ‘Developing laminated structural elements from fibre-managed plantation hardwood’, which aims to undertake research and development for milling fibre-managed Tasmanian plantation eucalypt logs into dry and graded boards, converting these boards into glulam and similar products, and using these products in building design and construction. Your research will likely contribute to knowledge in the areas of structural design and manufacturing of mass timber elements using plantation hardwood.

This project will involve some fieldwork, and close collaboration with Tasmanian wood products manufacturers and other industry partners.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have a Bachelor Honours degree of at least second class lower standard with a Minimum Research Component, a Masters degree (Coursework) or a Graduate Diploma with a Minimum Research Component
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, analytical and design skillss
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The incumbent’s selection will be based on their expertise in timber and/or production engineering systems
  • All applicants will be asked to provide a CV, statement of interest and relevant documents demonstrating eligibility according to the University's entry requirements
  • Shortlisted applicants will be asked to provide a short video outlining their work/research background, research proposal and interests in the topic
  • Shortlisted applicants may also be asked to undertake some 'mini-tasks' to demonstrate their writing capacity and responsiveness to feedback
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Hui Jiao for further information.

Closing Date

15th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood (CSAW) at the University of Tasmania is inviting applications for a Masters by Research scholarship to help identify the causes and generate management tools to address the impacts of market-limiting, process-induced discolouration of appearance Tasmanian hardwood boards, particularly ‘tyre track’ recently found in thin section appearance plantation Tasmanian Oak (E.nitens) and ‘sticker mark’ in Tasmanian Blackwood. Your research will be affiliated with a series of eight current research and development projects based at CSAW, in Launceston, Tasmania, that have been funded via a National Institute for Forest Products Innovation (NIFPI) competitive research grants and industry support initiative..

Your research will be linked to the NIFPI research project, titled ‘Minimising market-limiting discolouration in appearance Tasmanian hardwood’, which aims to determine the causes of discolouration through empirical study. It is likely your research methodology will involve a combination of mill-based trials and advanced microscopy and chemical assessment techniques to address the problem. Once the likely primary causes of discolouration are determined, management techniques will be developed to minimise their occurrence, and best practice guidance prepared and distributed to industry.

This project will involve collaboration with the University of Tasmania’s Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science (ACROSS), Tasmanian wood products manufacturers and other industry partners.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have a Bachelor Honours degree of at least second class lower standard with a Minimum Research Component, a Masters degree (Coursework) or a Graduate Diploma with a Minimum Research Component
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, analytical and design skillss
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The incumbent’s selection will be based on their expertise in physical and/or organic chemistry and their interest in wood science
  • All applicants will be asked to provide a CV, statement of interest and relevant documents demonstrating eligibility according to the University's entry requirements
  • Shortlisted applicants will be asked to provide a short video outlining their work/research background, research proposal and interests in the topic
  • Shortlisted applicants may also be asked to undertake some 'mini-tasks' to demonstrate their writing capacity and responsiveness to feedback
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Kyra Wood for further information.

Closing Date

15th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood (CSAW) at the University of Tasmania is inviting applications for a PhD scholarship to study the effectiveness of short duration durability assessment techniques for collapse-prone hardwoods used in Australian conditions. Your research will be affiliated with a series of eight current research and development projects based at CSAW, in Launceston, Tasmania, that have been funded via a National Institute for Forest Products Innovation (NIFPI) competitive research grants and industry support initiative.

Your research will be linked to the NIFPI research project, titled ‘New methods of reliably demonstrating species durability in commercially relevant time frames’, which aims to establish the comparative durability of commercially relevant hardwood species and treated material not yet adequately covered in the Australian standards. It is likely your research will aim to use existing methodologies wherever possible, but also investigate new ways to modify procedures to accelerate moisture entry or enhance biological attack, to help establish research time frames that are more commercially viable.

This project extends the scope of an affiliated NIFPI project titled: ‘Increasing the durability and other material characteristics of Tasmanian hardwoods’. This project will involve some fieldwork and close collaboration with the University of the Sunshine Coast’s National Centre for Timber Durability & Design Life, Tasmanian wood products manufacturers and other industry partners. A PhD scholarship is also available through the University of the Sunshine Coast for research relating to this topic.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, analytical and design skillss
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The incumbent’s selection will be based on their expertise in wood durability, microbiology and science, and their interest in sustainability and manufacturing with Tasmanian hardwood species
  • All applicants will be asked to provide a CV, statement of interest and relevant documents demonstrating eligibility according to the University's entry requirements
  • Shortlisted applicants will be asked to provide a short video outlining their work/research background, research proposal and interests in the topic
  • Shortlisted applicants may also be asked to undertake some 'mini-tasks' to demonstrate their writing capacity and responsiveness to feedback
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Kyra Wood for further information.

Closing Date

1st January 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Dr. Georgia Lindsay invites expressions of interest from those interested in undertaking a PhD. Broadly speaking, Georgia's research emphasizes the human side of design, including pre-occupancy analysis and programming, use and behaviour-focused post-occupancy evaluation, and studying the meaning and effects of architecture. More specifically, her work focuses on museum buildings, and how architecture is used by institutions and cities to communicate values and brand places. 

Working with Georgia will allow you to define and develop your own area of focus. Some general areas might include:

  • Making meaning within constructed ecologies – projects that help frame and analyse how sustainable building features   are used and understood
  • Understanding and responding to participatory practices in design  – studies relating to stakeholder and community needs, including addressing mixed methods for both engagement and data collection practices
  • Branding and communication – projects investigating the social uses  and meanings inherent in architecture and design at a variety of levels of analysis

Students work with supervisory teams of at least two, and other supervisors might include David Beynon, Julian Worrell, or Ceridwen Owen.

Eligibility
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Ability to create a compelling proposal and expression of interest
  • Background in social science or design fields
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Georgia Lindsay for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Governments and communities have invested large amounts of project funds and efforts in vulnerability assessment and planning for adaptation to climate change. This research project investigates the long term effectiveness of this investment in improvement of resilience, reduction of vulnerability, and effectiveness of the adaptation options.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Joanna Ellison for more information.

Closing Date

28th February 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Antarctica continues to deform as a result of past and present surface loading changes, especially ice loading changes, and Earthquake-related effects. Over the last 10 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been increasingly deployed in Antarctica to measure surface deformation. These data are now yielding sufficiently precise surface velocity time series to be able to separate competing models and in doing so learn new things about the interior of the Earth and the past ice loading history.

This project will focus on the analysis of GPS data with state-of-the-art techniques in order to better understand the deformation of Antarctica. It will apply novel techniques to remove time series noise and compare these to numerical models developed from existing codes and from outputs provided by third parties. These results will be important for understanding present-day ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise and in gaining fundamental understanding into the interior of the Earth. The project will provide students with advanced skills in numerical analysis, interpretation and presentation.

Eligibility
  • 1st class Honours degree, or overseas equivalent, in a relevant field
  • Nationals of Crimea Region of Ukraine, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Syria are unfortunately unable to apply due to software restrictions
  • Applications are invited from qualified individuals from all other nations, including Australia

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Quantitative Earth Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Geodesy
  • Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • A track record of publication of research results in international journals
  • Proven ability to work within a team as well as independently
  • Experience of geodetic GNSS software (desirable)
  • Willingness to learn new skills and competencies
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

30 May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Dr Kate Booth is inviting expressions of interest from those interested in undertaking a PhD. Located within one of the strongest geography schools in Australia, potential co-supervisors include:

Kate’s research is underpinned by an interest in place and places and the possibility of political dissent. Her work spans economic, social and cultural geography, and planning. She supervises students with a wide range of perspectives and topics. Working with Kate will allow you to define and develop your own area of interest. In addition, joining Kate’s team provides access to:

  • Tourism Tracer – world-first tracking and survey data of tourist movements within Tasmania. This rich dataset offers opportunity for analysis and critical interpretation in light of theories of space and place, mobility studies, and science and technology studies. Tourism Tracer is led by Dr Anne Hardy (University of Tasmania).
  • When Disaster Strikes: Geographies of Under-insurance – ground breaking research on the co-production of insurance in everyday life and in the context of socio-natural change. Team members: Dr Kate Booth, Professor Bruce Tranter and Chloe Lucas (University of Tasmania), Dr Christine Eriksen and Dr Eliza de Vet (University of Wollongong), and Associate Professor Shaun French (University of Nottingham, UK).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in human geography
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

More Information

Please contact Dr Kate Booth for more information.

Closing Date

13th December 2019 

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The global community agrees that while mitigation remains one part of the climate solution, adaptation is now an essential component of living with climate change. Cities and regions must confront the realities of living with climate change and collectively developing adaptation pathways that allow communities to be resilient and responsive to the types of impacts and change they will experience as a routine part of life.

Addressing this risk is a challenge, but it is not insurmountable – coordinated action based on best available knowledge will allow society to be ‘climate ready’ as it faces higher frequency of extreme events and increasingly hostile climate conditions. Adaptation pathways are one way of identifying and planning for the changes that communities will have to make in the face of change.

This PhD will focus on methods for mapping adaptation pathways (e.g., through participatory workshops, spatial mapping of risks and responses), and implementing these in practice to identify regional adaptation pathways for a range of climate risks.  Possible risks for consideration include exposure to increased bushfire risk in the peri-urban fringe or flooding in the coastal zone. Outcomes from this PhD research will include:

  1. Identification of adaptation pathways for managing risk;
  2. Collaborative engagement with key stakeholders (e.g. Hobart City Council, State Government agencies) to integrate these pathways into region-wide climate change adaptation plans;
  3. Improved understanding of the policy processes and enabling conditions required to support integration of these pathways into ‘normal business’;
  4. A regional network of collaborative relationships between decision-makers across relevant sectors to support coordinated action on climate change adaptation.

PhD supervisory team will include co-supervisors Dr Rebecca Harris, Professor Jason Byrne, and Professor Jan McDonald.

Eligibility
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geography, planning, conservation, law, economics, spatial sciences, ecology or a related subject
  • Demonstrated experience working with a range of stakeholders (e.g. local government) (desirable)
  • Social science and/or science communication related training (desirable)
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills (desirable)
  • Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS, remote sensing) (desirable)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer-reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Vanessa Adams for further information.

Closing Date

18th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The concept of place attachment describes how strongly people connect to place to distinguish between the physical resources provided by place (dependence) and the emotional and symbolic relationships people form with place (identity). Over the past decade, the measurement and mapping of the core dimensions of place attachment has been initiated through the concept of landscape values, thereby operationalising the place concept for land-use planning at multiple spatial scales. The mapping of landscape values has emerged as a key research method for identifying important areas for conservation and sustainable development but has yet to be explored in the context of places at risk of loss from climate change.

The impacts of climate are inherently spatial and the effects will be felt heterogeneously across a population both due to the spatial location of impacts and the socio-demographics of the population. This PhD project will examine concept of ‘place’ and what types of responses of loss may be felt by the community as places are impacted. This may include approaches such as mapping landscape values with public participatory GIS (PPGIS), qualitative interviews to understand why particular places are significant, surveys or interviews to explore what experiences of loss the population has experienced as places have been impacted historically, and spatial mapping of how predicted impacts of climate change overlap with landscape values.

Supervisory team will include co-supervisors Dr Rebecca Harris, Distinguished Professor Jamie Kirkpatrick, Professor Elizabeth Lester
External collaborators include Distinguished Professor Greg Brown

Eligibility
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in conservation, ecology, economics, geography, spatial sciences or a related subject
  • Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS, remote sensing) (desirable)
  • Statistical analysis skills (desirable)
  • Social science or communications related training (desirable)
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer-reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Vanessa Adams for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Dr Dave Kendal is seeking expressions of interest from prospective RHD students interested in understanding how and why we can better incorporate the community into environmental/nature policy and management decision-making. Global, national and local nature conservation policy has been through a period of being heavily framed as scientific, rational and evidence based. However, this framing largely excludes other ways of knowing nature, and the wide variety of ways that nature is important to people. Much public policy is being reframed to incorporate a wide range of values of the public, and management decision-making is increasingly including objectives other than species conservation and biodiversity protection. Dave has been a member of Australia's Threatened Species Scientific Committee and has a broad range of experiences managing research projects and supervising RHD students exploring topics related to public involvement in nature conservation.

Potential co-supervisors within Geography include: Prof Jason Byrne, Prof Jamie Kirkpatrick, A/Prof Aidan Davison, Dr Vanessa Adams, Dr Rebecca Harris

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Dave Kendal for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Dr Dave Kendal is seeking expressions of interest from prospective HDR students interested in understanding the reciprocal effects of people on urban nature. Dave has a broad range of experiences managing research projects and supervising HDR students exploring topics such as:

  • What drives decision making in urban parks and street tree management? How can we incorporate the views of the public into urban landscape management?
  • Which urban trees will be best suited to our future climates? What traits of trees influence the benefits they provide to people and wildlife?
  • What roles does nature play for urban dwellers? How do values shape the way people think about and interact with urban nature and its management?
  • What role do cities play in the conservation of threatened species? Can species conservation co-occur with other urban landscape uses such as recreation and the provision of ecosystem services?

Dave has a particular interest in understanding how landscapes and people might be changing with social-ecological change. Potential co-supervisors within Geography include: Prof Jason Byrne, Prof Jamie Kirkpatrick, A/Prof Aidan Davison, Dr Vanessa Adams, Dr Rebecca Harris

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Dr Dave Kendal for more information.

Closing Date

1st September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Facial Emotion Recognition is the process of identifying human emotion, most typically from human facial expressions. AI-based facial emotion detection can be applied in a variety of fields such as Driver Fatigue Monitoring, Marketing, and Entertainment. Driver Fatigue Monitoring employs facial emotion detection to determine whether a driver is in a state of fatigue so as to appropriately intervene in the behaviour of the driver to avoid possible accidents. Advertisers and market researchers try to use consumer emotional engagement with digital content, such as videos and ads, to create the best ads and optimizing media spend.

The popularity of deep learning approaches in the domain of emotion recognition may be mainly attributed to its success in related AI applications such as Computer Vision. Well-known deep learning algorithms include different architectures of Deep Neural Network (DNN) such as Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). Deep Neural Networks have increasingly been employed to learn discriminative representations for automatic facial emotion recognition with some success, however, certain significant issues remain unresolved. Such issues include: Occlusion-robust and pose-invariant issues; Dataset bias and imbalanced distribution; Optimal DNN parameter set; Multimodal effect. In this project, you will develop new deep learning algorithms to overcome these and possibly other issues for faster, more reliable, and more accurate facial emotion detection.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Shuxiang Xu for further information.

Closing Date

30 October 2019

The Research Project

Machine learning approaches have been used for developing predictive models such as recommender systems, which seek to predict the preference that a user would give to an item. In recent years a new algorithm named Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) has been developed for training Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). With ELM, there are no iterations for adjusting connection weights and parameters tuning as in back propagation based ANNs.

While ELM has demonstrated superior performance in developing smaller recommender systems, one drawback of it is that, given an application with a big dataset, the number of neurons in its single hidden layer are typically very large and hence training the network can be computationally impractical. The ELM algorithm’s complexity is at least O(KM2), where K is the number of training instances and M is the number of hidden units. ELM also makes use of batch training, which leads to large memory consumption.

The project aims to evaluate several different solutions (such as representation learning and Deep ELMs) for these problems, and propose a new algorithm for maintaining the strengths of ELM but overcoming its weaknesses in performance and efficiency. Such a solution would be very valuable for developing more effective recommender systems in the current big data era.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Machine learning algorithms
  • Data mining and data analytics

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

30 October 2019

The Research Project

Sentiment analysis (also known as opinion mining) refers to the use of natural language processing and text analysis to identify and extract subjective information in source materials. Sentiment analysis is widely applied to reviews and social media for a variety of applications, ranging from marketing to customer service. Sentiment analysis aims to determine the attitude of a speaker or a writer with respect to some topic or the overall contextual polarity of a document. The attitude may be his or her judgment or evaluation, affective state (the emotional state of the author when writing), or the intended emotional communication (the emotional effect the author wishes to have on the reader).

The rise of social media such as blogs and social networks has fuelled interest in sentiment analysis. With the proliferation of reviews, ratings, recommendations and other forms of online expression, online opinion has turned into a kind of virtual currency for businesses looking to market their products, identify new opportunities and manage their reputations. Companies look to automate the process of filtering out the noise, understanding the conversations, identifying the relevant content, and actioning it appropriately. This project aims at employing Machine Learning algorithms to automatically detect sentiment in user reviews of interested online business websites.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement
  • Candidates must demonstrate experience and strong interest in Machine Learning or general computational intelligence

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Game mechanics are constructs of rules or methods designed for interaction with the game state, thus providing gameplay. All games use mechanics; however, theories and styles differ as to their ultimate importance to the game.
Different games may have the same mechanic (e.g. jumping) but differ in the exact implementation of that mechanic. The differences between these basic mechanics can be slight, or vast, and the differences between all of the core mechanics in a game can lead to games feeling entirely different for the player.

This study proposed developing techniques to sample the differences between mechanics across a range of games and to reverse engineer the techniques used to create them. From the collected mechanics a taxonomy could then be built to classify these games by the gameplay techniques they employ.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More information

Please contact Dr Ian Lewis for more information.

Closing Date

30th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

As learner interaction in an online educational environment leaves a lot of digital traces behind, vast data sets of students’ online activities are available, which is known as Big data. Data and analytics in education, teaching and learning has attained great interest, resulting high-quality research into models, methods, technologies, and impact of analytics in education area. Big data and learning analytics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) is greatly extending the power of computers to revolutionise education sector. Educational data mining techniques discover meaningful patterns in these large datasets to create probabilistic and predictive models such as student success algorithms, understand and optimise learning and the environment. Learning analytics and AI are not panaceas for addressing all the issues and decisions faced by higher education but become part of the solution to enhance and transforms the way to support learning process.

The aim of the project is to investigate the deployment of AI techniques and analytical model/algorithm for improving learning analytics and for discovering the meaningful patterns in the large datasets of students to improve educational processes.

Eligibility
  • Experience with programming
  • Critical thinking

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Computers are starting to be used to recognise affect which can provide better assistance to human users. Models to be used to recognise human emotion which will lead to another form of computer-assisted learning, perceptual information retrieval, interaction, and human health. Affective Computing is the term used to define IT systems and devices, which support the collection of data about human emotions through their facial expression, their voice tone, activities and interaction with other humans. Unlike other traditional types of computing, “affective computing” provides a method to “read” and “understanding” the emotion state of the user. Therefore, enhancement of the links between human and human as well as the interaction between users and their computers is worthy of investigation.

The learning domain as an applied area is a relatively new area in terms of finding out the user’s emotional status in order to equip teacher/teaching modules to react and enhance the user’s learning experiences and learning outcomes.

The aim of this project is to investigate if there is any way for the early detection of possible difficulties of learners. If the detection is possible, teacher/teaching module can assist to solve the problem promptly via an application based on deep learning algorithms.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience with programming  in deep learning
  • Critical thinking
  • Programming skills

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

1st October 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Automated clinical decision-making systems in the study of medical informatics over the years have proved to be capable of supporting health care practitioners but have also been the subject of inadequate computer-assisted diagnosis and medical misinterpretation, raising suspicion in the adoption of mathematical algorithms for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. This research proposal presents an approach that integrates machine learning applications on electronic health record and image-based data for a holistic medical analysis, which is central to the technical challenges of artificial intelligence research in medicine.

This study aims to provide a protocol of training machine learning systems that prioritize the demand for accurate diagnosis, especially in medical conditions that require complex procedures to detect and respond to. By reevaluating the established modalities in machine learning applications and integrating computational techniques such as natural language processing, transfer learning, convolutional neural networks, and recurrent neural networks for a functional facility of artificial intelligence, this research proposal expects to formulate an autonomous clinical decision-making system, featuring an intermediate supervisory control system based on fuzzy logic that can provide elaborate medical analyses. This study contributes to the development of computer-assisted health care, as well as to the interdisciplinary praxis between engineering and medical science.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

20th December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Social media has become one of the most important tools for people to share information and interact with others. On social media, people may expose themselves to a wide range of "observers", which include not only relatives and close friends, but also strangers and even stalkers. This raises a serious cyber security issue, i.e., online privacy leak.

Online privacy leak means an individual user shares his/her private information to people who he/she does not know well or even strangers on the Internet. This can be very dangerous for general Internet users, especially with the booming of OSNs. It is necessary to have a tool to assist general users to make better use of OSNs, and protect them from leaking privacy information. However, different with many other cyber security problems, online privacy leak is not only a computer security problem, but more related with users' Internet safety awareness. A cyber stalker is also an Internet (human) user. He/she may use normal Internet operations to collect someone's information on purpose without breaching any security protocols. On the other side, many Internet and Online Social Network (OSN) users lack of the awareness of Internet safety. Under this motivation, some preliminary work has been done to explore the use of AI techniques in the detection of abnormal attention to avoid privacy leak and avoid cyberstalking. Such approaches can quantify the risk levels of information sharing by considering the amount of a user's shared messages in OSNs and the trust relationships of the information readers with the user. However, the boundary between normal and abnormal observers is not very clear. Hence, the quantification of normal and abnormal attention can be inaccurate or different with users' understanding.

To overcome some of the above limitations, this project will investigate the use of NLP and deep learning methods in privacy information detection, and propose an automated approach which can detect privacy related information from the posted messages in social media, and remind users about the potential privacy leakage in a user friendly way.

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:
  • Computer science
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Information technology
Eligibility
  • Degree-level undergraduate and postgraduate education in ICT or a related subject.
  • Good knowledge background in math, statistics, AI, machine learning and NLP.
  • Good programming skills.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Higher Education is transforming with advancement of internet technologies and globalisation. Students are becoming more diverse, heterogeneous and large. The traditional way of university teaching, with one teaching material for all, cannot work and is currently making several students dissatisfied. Due to increases in the competition from online courses such as MooCs, it is becoming more and more important for higher education institutions to provide their students with a good learning experience. They need to increase student retention and make them engaged. Moreover, they have to deal with limited resources, thus making personalised education which an individual student will look for, an impossibility.

Due to these challenges, big data analytics have been seen as a solution. We have technology and access to more data about each student than before. Thus, if one can process this large data and generate insights, the education personalisation is not an unreachable goal. The sentimental analysis, data mining, machine learning and recommendation systems are already helping in areas such as Medical care system.

The aim of this project is to develop BigData analytical models and techniques for improving learning among students and improving education processes.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Strong Algorithmic Skills
  • Programming Skills
  • Distributed Systems

More information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

BigData applications for their execution requires not only consideration of their computation requirements but also of their data. IoT (Internet of Things) applications have led to further importance of fast execution of big data applications. Many solutions have been proposed to run them in a single cloud. However, due to distribution of big data across several regions and each region having their own privacy policy, multi-Cloud environments become important for efficient and privacy preserving execution. However, these environments also bring challenges as large data needs to be transferred between different Cloud computing environments using the Internet which can adversely affect the execution performance and also needs more specialised security frameworks to preserve privacy of the data. In this PhD project, new mechanisms and frameworks will be investigated which can allow execution of BigData applications across multiple Cloud environments for IoT applications.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Strong Algorithmic Skills
  • Programming Skills
  • Distributed Systems

More information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

For environment conservation, on-going bird monitoring is required which is done through acoustic sensors installed across different forests in Australia. Currently, analysis of this is done by few specialists who need to hear long recordings to detect species of birds and then do further analysis. This is really infeasible when one talks about petabytes of data to analyse. However, current machine learning methods which can scale to bigdata and detect bird species are not available. This PhD project will investigate such machine learning methods that can detect bird species in real time.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics

Contact for more information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Human centred design and the more focused area of human computer interaction have emerged as key approaches when making information accessible to people across a range of human conditions, including but not limited to people with low literacy skills and people suffering from one or more cognitive conditions. This project leverages the information grounds framework developed at the University of Washington (Seattle, USA) and revisited in our research group to understand the specific needs of a target population and then derive ways to address the specific needs of individuals in addition to groups.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research skills in addition to an interest in and passion for the human condition
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Centered Design/Human Computer Interaction
  • Information Systems/Library and Information Science (LIS)
  • Psychology

More Information

Please contact Professor Christopher Lueg for more information.

Closing Date


20th December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Social media has become one of the most important tools for people to share information and interact with others. On social media, people may expose themselves to a wide range of "observers", which include not only relatives and close friends, but also strangers and even stalkers. This raises a serious cyber security issue, i.e., online privacy leak.

Online privacy leak means an individual user shares his/her private information to people who he/she does not know well or even strangers on the Internet. This can be very dangerous for general Internet users, especially with the booming of OSNs. It is necessary to have a tool to assist general users to make better use of OSNs, and protect them from leaking privacy information. However, different with many other cyber security problems, online privacy leak is not only a computer security problem, but more related with users' Internet safety awareness. A cyber stalker is also an Internet (human) user. He/she may use normal Internet operations to collect someone's information on purpose without breaching any security protocols. On the other side, many Internet and Online Social Network (OSN) users lack of the awareness of Internet safety. Under this motivation, some preliminary work has been done to explore the use of AI techniques in the detection of abnormal attention to avoid privacy leak and avoid cyberstalking. Such approaches can quantify the risk levels of information sharing by considering the amount of a user's shared messages in OSNs and the trust relationships of the information readers with the user. However, the boundary between normal and abnormal observers is not very clear. Hence, the quantification of normal and abnormal attention can be inaccurate or different with users' understanding.

To overcome some of the above limitations, this project will investigate the use of NLP and deep learning methods in privacy information detection, and propose an automated approach which can detect privacy related information from the posted messages in social media, and remind users about the potential privacy leakage in a user friendly way.

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:
  • Computer science
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Information technology
Eligibility
  • Degree-level undergraduate and postgraduate education in ICT or a related subject.
  • Good knowledge background in math, statistics, AI, machine learning and NLP.
  • Good programming skills.

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.

Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.

Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.

Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Given the important challenges associated with the processing of brain signals obtained from neuroimaging modalities, fuzzy sets, neural networks and evolutional systems have been proposed as a useful and effective framework for the modelling and understanding of brain activity patterns as well as to enable a direct communication pathway between the brain and external devices (brain computer/machine interfaces). However, most of the research so far has focused on lab-based applications in constrained scenarios, which cannot be extrapolated to realistic field contexts. Considering the decoding of brain activity, the computational Intelligence models, including fuzzy sets, neural networks, and evolutional computation, provide an excellent tool to overcome the challenge of learning from brain activity patterns that are very likely to be affected by non-stationary behaviours and high uncertainty. The application of computational Intelligence methods to learning and modeling​ has recently demonstrated its remarkable usefulness for coping with the effects of extremely noisy environments, as well as the variability and dynamicity of brain signals. Additionally, neurobiological studies have suggested that the behaviour of neural cells exhibits functional patterns that resemble the properties of intelligent computation to encode logical perception. This paves the way for developing new computational intelligence techniques based on intelligence abstractions that foster the capabilities for modeling and understanding brain function from a quantitative point of view.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a {Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research} degree.

The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Selection Criteria

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Foundational programming skills
  • Statistics

More Information

Please contact Zehong Cao for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

BigData applications for their execution requires not only consideration of their computation requirements but also of their data. Many solutions are proposed to run them in single cloud. However, due to distribution of big data across several regions and each region having their own privacy policy, Multi-Cloud environments becomes important for efficient and privacy preserving execution. However, these environments also bring challenge as large data need to be transferred between different Cloud computing environments using internet which can adversely affect the execution performance and also needs more specialised security frameworks to preserve privacy of the data. In this PhD project, new mechanisms and frameworks will be investigated which can allow execution of BigData applications across multiple Cloud environments.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Distributed systems
  • Programming skills
  • Mathematical skills, particularly optimisation

More Information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

30 September 2019

The Research Project

Harvesting trees that contain internal defects such as knots and cracks is neither financially nor environmentally sustainable. In native forest, high quality sawlogs can only be produced from knot free logs and forest habitats and ecology can only be maintained by selecting and retaining suitable habitat trees. Similarly in hardwood plantations it is impossible to produce sawlogs from knotty or cracked timber. For both types of forests challenges remain in being able to identify internal defects in a timely and cost-effective manner prior to harvesting.

This current project aims to:

  • Proof of concept through trials in native and plantation eucalypt forests
  • Build a predictive imputation model for different types of tree species and different growing conditions across Australia

The field assessment involve using various non-destructive techniques including ultrasonic and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) that use electromagnetic and ultrasonic sound waves respectively to penetrate the internal structure of standing trees. These assessment techniques will assist forest growers to more accurately evaluate the quality of growing stems in the field. A wide selection of growing conditions and forest types will be assessed to generate data that can then be used to generate a software algorithm for predictive imputation of likely internal defect rates within particular forests under particular growing conditions.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Thorough understanding of NDE principles and techniques
  • Demonstrated experience supporting new software/hardware development and mobile applications
  • Minimum of 1 year of experience in at least 2 of the following test methods: Ultrasonic, Magnetic Particle, Eddy Current, Shearography, or Thermography
  • Must have a couple of peer-reviewed publication in Q1/Q2 journals or conference proceedings
  • Technical background in computational solid mechanics
  • Experience with modeling and simulation tools
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages

More Information

Please contact Dr Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

30th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Digital twins are a virtualized description including data and mathematical models of a real-world object. It enables easy sharing of the objects by digitally re-producing it's features for understanding of its functionalities. Such features often do not replicate physical effects accurately in the cyberspace but are useful to visualize any object without actually creating it.

Digital twins can be created in Virtual Reality (VR) or Augmented Reality (AR) for emulating IoT devices in real-time to provide a wide range of user experiences. This project intends to investigate the methods of creating Digital twins for both single device systems typically small enough to fit on a desk and multi-device complex systems spread over a room or building.

The research can look into various areas including:

  • Methods of constructing IoT devices and large IoT system as a digital twin in VR/AR interconnecting the virtual objects and the real world physical IoT counterparts
  • Classification of desktop VR and in-room VR and how it is impacted by the IoT device's construction and operation
  • Use of VR/AR digital twins when applied in Education/Training purposes

The application area could be Remote Laboratories which is meant for education and training using a range of electromechanical systems. However, other applications areas may be chosen as well, depending on candidate's area of expertise.

Eligibility

Useful skill set of the candidate:

  • Basic concepts of VR/AR technologies; preferably ThreeJS or similar
  • Programming in Raspberry Pi or Arduino or other µController

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Ananda Maiti for further information.

Closing Date

31 October 2019

  • Applicants should contact the supervisor (Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri), and submit their application as soon as possible.
  • Applicants wishing to commence in 2019 should complete the Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application processes as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Non-invasive detection of illnesses by human breath analysis is an emerging field of bio-medical diagnostics representing a rapid, economic, and simple alternative to standard blood analysis and endoscopy. The bulk matrix of the breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour, and inert gases. Acetone is a selective breath marker to type-1 diabetes. It is produced by hepatocytes via decarboxylation of excess acetyl-coenzyme A. The operation of a direct-reading, selective chemical sensor is based on the existence of a selective recognition event that results in a change in a measurable parameter. Most of the common commercial gas sensors are based on semiconductors, polymer materials and the methods used for sensing are optical methods, calorimetric methods, gas chromatography and acoustic methods.

In this project a titanium-based gas sensor will be developed for selective detection of acetone for easy diagnosis of diabetes by breath analysis. The synthetized titanium material can be composed with a semiconductor to investigate its material characterization. The prepared materials will be characterized using FTIR, XRD, FESEM-EDX, TEM, XPS and BET and other required characterizations.

The core of this project will involve developing an appropriate user-centred design for patients to be able to  process, understand and interpret electronic signals or data produced by the gas sensor. The input part then consists of transducers that gather and transform information from the physical world with the last step of the transformation resulting in an electrical signal.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in ICT, chemistry or a related subject
  • Must have a couple of peer-reviewed publication in Q1/Q2 journals or conference proceedings.
  • Experience with modelling and simulation tools.
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations.
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages.

More Information

Please contact Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Much of real world network data are visualised as node-link diagrams for sense making purposes. In drawing networks, link or edge crossings should be avoided since they are confusing. To achieve this, people have proposed to draw curved edges, rather than straight-line edges, to reduce the visual clutter. Curves also make diagrams look more visually pleasing. In contrast to the expectations, recent research have found that curved-edge diagrams do not necessarily lead to better human task performance. However, it is not known why and how curved-edge diagrams are not better in helping people read networks, and when curved-edge visualisations are better.

To answer this question, this project will use the latest eye tracking technology to understand how people execute visual queries moment by moment. More specifically in this project, the student will conduct literature review, and design and conduct a series of user studies to investigate 1) how people read straight-line and curved-edge networks; and 2) why and when one edge style is better than another.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience with publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied statistics
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Tony Huang for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Increasingly, collaboration across distance requires communication about specific physical objects, such as valuable cultural artifacts or pricey merchandise. This project builds on well-published PhD research looking into the annotation of museum artifacts to generalise the approach to a range of situations where remote collaboration is anchored in physical objects present at particular locations.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research skills in addition to an interest in and passion for the human condition
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Computer Interaction/Interaction Design
  • Design and Development, including Prototyping
  • Digital Libraries/Digital Humanities

More Information

Please contact Professor Christopher Lueg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

We have developed an automated blood oxygen level controller for preterm infants that has recently been undergoing clinical trials. This PhD project aims to make further advances by investigating enhancements to our current oxygen control algorithm and technology. The project will focus on topics such as development of advanced sensing technology for respiration and oxygenation using imaging based systems and electronic sensing technology. This will include development of advanced image processing and/or sensor signal processing algorithms.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, including Biomedical, Mechatronic and Electrical/Electronics Engineering.

More Information

Please contact Dr Tim Gale for more information.

Closing Date

30 September 2019

The Research Project

Demand for effective and efficient approaches to map, monitor and manage underwater environments continues to grow. Industrial, climatological and environmental activities increasingly require ever-more accurate modelling and analysis of underwater environments. Many technological approaches have already been developed to address challenges imposed by darkness, depth/pressure and salinity. However water turbidity (cloudiness) continues to be a major inhibitor underwater, especially where there is a requirement for real-time data.

This project aims to contribute to the science of methods for data capture and analysis of real-time vision in turbid circumstances. To test these methods the research team have forged collaboration with an industrial partner who is actively engaged in industrial underwater timber harvesting. This project presents a unique opportunity to enhance the activities and advancing the science of real-time vision in turbid waters.

Recent improvements in underwater video systems and in processing algorithms for image filtering and detection suggest a new research opportunity. The plan is to mount a video camera system on the harvester head to capture video-images that will be processed in real-time to provide improved vision clarity in these turbid underwater environments. It is anticipated that this improved vision combined with improved sonar mapping will enable the harvester to locate, manoeuvre and safely harvest submerged tree stems at greater depth than is currently possible.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Thorough understanding of information systems, big data, acoustic
  • Demonstrated experience supporting new software/hardware development and mobile applications
  • Experience with modelling and simulation tools
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages

More Information

Please contact Dr Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Practical applications of knowledge base systems to multidisciplinary domains with "big data" are typically limited to standard machine learning approaches – you take the domain data, develop a model and then apply it, with little further modification of the model possible. Unfortunately, such techniques limit the future practicality or maintenance of the developed system – additional knowledge or knowledge maintenance is a hard, cumbersome task that requires redeveloping the learnt model from scratch.

The project will focus on the development of hybrid method that can maintain knowledge base for new pattern found in the future. It will investigate how to improve existing machine learning algorithms in determining patterns (classification) in data sets by using a modified. The proposed system increases accuracy of results and greater computational efficiency for large datasets ("big data".) Then the system then supplements the model produced by using an incremental knowledge acquisition system, RDR (Compton and Jansen 1988)). Standard RDR incrementally adds to this machine-learnt knowledge base by allowing a (non ICT) domain expert to incrementally, independently supplement this knowledge model by way of adding new rules (for classification), and correcting or deleting incorrect classifications. This means the resulting system should be able to adapt quickly to new data – a deficiency from which traditional machine learning systems suffer.

Our future theoretical enhancements to the system include adding the capability of allowing simultaneous multiple classifications (Kang 1995). Existing machine learning algorithms for classification technically can only conclude with one classification at a time for a given data case – whereas some expert domains can greatly benefit from multiple classification. This is an exciting possibility for future research.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

More Information

Please contact Dr Byeong Kang for more information.

Closing Date

28th February 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Deep Learning recently lends itself extremely well to the research in computer vision domain where hierarchical structures of computational neurons can learn predictive features to effectively make predictive decisions. For example, in health care, deep learning is becoming also popular among medical imaging researchers who are looking for great tools to process a large number of images produced by scanners.

The impact of this to the society is potential and attract more and more attention from health care experts who have been looking for better methods to reduce the error rates in diagnosis. However, the most common deep learning models used for image processing are CNN-based which is a complex black-box consisting of millions of parameters that confused the experts of why the decisions are made. As a result, there is an increasing scepticism from those who do not want to use deep learning because of the lack of explainability.

In this research, the student will improve the transparency of deep neural networks to provide insights of the decision-making process. The topics of interest are (but not limited to):

  • Medical imaging (eye disease detection, knee pain prevention, etc.)
  • Visual reasoning, image captioning
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Son Tran for further information.

Closing Date

24 May 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Soils, though often modelled as continuum, are particulate in nature. Professor Andrew Chan has performed extensive research on the interaction of particles and fluid using the discrete element method and Lattice Boltzmann method. This project is to extend current research to three-dimensions, non-circular particles and implementation on a parallel computer. The method can then be applied to various practical engineering problems such as liquefaction of soil, undersea slope failure, behaviour of saturated soil under earthquake and dynamic loading as well as undersea extract of ores.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Programming skills
  • Engineering mechanics

More Information

Please contact Professor Andrew Chan for more information.

Closing Date

30th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Internet of Things (IoT) devices are predicted to be used in millions in near future. One type of these devices are the personal devices. Personal IoT devices interact a lot with their human owners as opposed to Industrial IoT devices. As such these devices need to guide or provide support to their users in certain conditions in the proper ways to use themselves.

This project will focus on creating smart algorithms and data structures where the device stores data and advise the users on how to use them in suitable ways. The devices can create usage profiles specific to their users. This would allow the device to rate and analyse the users on how effectively the devices are being used.

Furthermore, the personalized IoT devices can compare their states with other devices of same nature and determine the overall problems with themselves e.g. a specific action that every owner gets wrong. This could pave the way for improvement in the device or it's firmware.

Potential research contributions include a mathematical model based on a suitable data structure used to store the proper usage patterns and the actual usage patterns. It can also produce a method to rate the user's actions. It can share and compare this to other devices to identify potential problems with its own design.

IoT devices vary a lot in terms of constructions and usage. Some devices which can be used for training purposes need to measure the performance of the users. Other devices simply need to guide their owners. These proposed approaches could create personalized IoT devices that can collectively provide feedback to individual owners.

Eligibility

Preferred skill set of the candidate:

  • Basic concepts of machine learning with python or NodeJS
  • Programming in Raspberry Pi or Arduino or any other µController

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Ananda Maiti for further information.

Closing Date

31st October 2019 

The Research Project

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have revolutionised image recognition and related fields. Beginning with small networks such as AlexNet (), and progressing towards much larger networks like GoogleNet () and ResNet (), CNNs have been able to achieve performance in image recognition tasks on par with human performance.

As part of these advances, many CNN architectures have been proposed.  Typically, these consist of a combination of convolution layers of many varieties, combined with pooling layers, and usually terminating in dense layers.  A seemingly endless variety of directed acyclic graphs with these layers as nodes have been proposed.

While architectures have been inspired by biological neural image processing, it appears that many of the architectures are a result of intuition and trial-and-error.  While some attempt has been made to improve the computational efficiency, the primary aim of these architectures is almost invariable to improve image recognition accuracy.

Previous attempts to optimise graph or tree structures have used genetic programming.  The graph represents a potential solution to a problem and a population of these solutions is refined using evolutionary principles.  This approach has been used successfully with expression trees and behaviour trees.

This project will investigate the use of genetic programming approaches to learn an optimal architecture for CNNs.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computing
  • Computer Science
  • Mathematics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Experience with Deep Learning Algorithms
  • Background in Mathematics
  • Problem Solving
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Robert Ollington for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The rapid growth of the Internet and web applications provide an overwhelming amount of information. Benefited from online social mediums and crowd computing platforms, it is very easy to collection information from various sources nowadays. In the process of information digitisation, the information of an entity can be generated from multiple sources and the information digitised or collected might be conflicted, with different qualities and even from fake or malicious sources.

It is crucial to find out the truth (truths) of an entity from different sources which provide information about the entity. However, for many web applications are operated under uncertain and dynamic environments. There may exist no evaluation standard for information quality or ground truth, and the information sources can be dynamic.

Under such environments, the discovery and mining of truth/truths is critical. In this project, we will investigate the use of advance AI and data mining techniques in estimation trustworthiness or shared or crowd sourced information.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer science
  • Mathematical sciences
  • Data analytics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

The Internet of Things (IoT) has encouraged the rapid growth of ubiquitous displays, yet research into how multiple displays are currently being used and how they could be more effectively used is limited to niche markets. E-learning is one area that stands to benefit from this growing number of displays, be that in the classroom or in the home. The future use of this technology will be influenced by a myriad of features ranging from the combinatorial use of multiple displays of different form factors, to the semantic division of the content that is to be communicated, and the target audience to which this content is to be communicated to.

This work will investigate how ubiquitous displays in e-learning environments can increase student engagement with the learning content, other students, and the teaching team. The work will also investigate the factors that encourage and oppose take-up of ubiquitous display technologies in the classroom, including the perceptions and the cost realisation of the technologies.

This work lies at the intersect of three separate themes:

  • HCI
  • Wearable and shared displays
  • E-learning

The outcomes will contribute significantly to improving our understanding of the use of multiple display technology in e-learning environments.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Computer Interaction
  • User Centred Design, Prototyping, Testing and Evaluation

More Information

Please contact Dr Winyu Chinthammit for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In this project, HDR students implement (based on TensorFlow) of state-of-the-art Machine Learning (ML) algorithms to easily train intelligent agents for various games. The research goal is to speed up the learning process of multiple agents and allow each agent receives higher rewards in a game scenario. These trained agents can be presented in the demo workshop and can be used for multiple purposes, including testing of game builds and controlling behaviour.

In this project, we used the Unity platform, a new open-source toolkit, which has been developed for creating and interacting with simulation environments. Specifically, the Unity ML Agents Toolkit is an open-source Unity plugin that enables games and simulations to serve as environments for training intelligent agents. This project will use this toolkit to develop dynamic multi-agent interaction, and agents can be trained using reinforcement learning, imitation learning, neuro-evolution, or other machine learning methods through a simple-to-use Python API.

Additionally, this project is mutually beneficial for both students and AI researchers as it provides a central platform where advances in AI can be evaluated on Unity's rich environments and then made accessible to the industry and research developer communities.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidate from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply
Selection Criteria
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zehong Cao for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Virtual Reality (VR) systems are being released in 2016 by a number of high-profile vendors with Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear, Sony PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift, and HTC Vive.

It is assumed that Serious Games will benefit from the increase in immersion and presence that the user feels when using VR, but study is required to see whether this effect leads to greater benefits for the purpose that the game is trying to achieve, be it education, behaviour change, rehabilitation, or data collection.

It is proposed to use a variety of techniques including physiological measures, participant observation, self-efficacy studies, surveys, and direct data comparisons to study the effects of players in serious games while in VR and while using more traditional systems.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More Information

Please contact Dr Ian Lewis for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Genome wide association studies (GWAS) using over 300 wheat accessions have revealed some tentative QTL for acid soil tolerance. These QTL are located to different positions to the known tolerance genes. To confirm that these QTL are different, different crosses will be made and the F2 populations will be screened for both acid soil tolerance and markers closely linked to previously reported genes. These populations which showed no correlation between acid soil tolerance and the selected markers will be genotyped and new QTL will be identified. Physiological studies will be conducted to assist the search of candidate genes.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Molecular biology
  • Plant science

More Information

Please contact Professor Meixue Zhou for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Increasing the legume component pastures is beneficial for animal production and health, and environmental sustainability due to the fixation of nitrogen by legume-associated bacteria.

Sensitivity to drought is a major limitation to broader perennial legume adaptation across much of the high rainfall permanent pasture region of SE Australia. Strong evidence exists that elevated levels of phosphorus and lime improves pasture persistence and recovery following drought. Potassium (K) is also implicated in pasture response to drought due to its known internal function in osmoregulation, including the control of water loss through stomata. However, little previous research has explored the extent to which increased K nutrition may improve drought tolerance of pasture legumes, or through which mechanisms increased persistence might be achieved. Micronutrients such as molybdenum (Mo) and boron (B) are also very important in legume growth and persistence, but their effect on drought tolerance is also unknown.

This project will use a series of glasshouse and field experiments to examine the effect of K, Mo and B on the response of a drought-sensitive forage species that is of international significance, white clover (Trifolium repens L.).

NB This project is in conjunction with New South Wales Department of Primary Industries  (NSW DPI). The student would be expected to spend the majority of their time based in NSW.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Beth Penrose for further information.

Closing Date

4th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Drought stress is a major environmental stress that threatens global food security and cost industry $60 Bln p.a. The drought tolerance trait was present in wild relatives of modern crops but has been lost during domestication. Numerous anatomical and physiological traits contribute to drought tolerance. Among these, development and operation of stomata – microscopic leaf valves mediating plant water and gas exchange – are arguably the most critical. This project aims to understand key stomata traits that that enable barley plants to optimize water use efficiency and adapt to drought conditions. This will be achieved by comparing stomata patterning and operation between modern (cultivated) barley varieties and their wild relatives followed by discovering QTLs harboring appropriate genes.

Eligibility
  • The project is open only to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or higher qualification(s)
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills and have background in plant physiology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Sergey Shabala for further information.

Closing Date

31st January 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The PhD candidate will conduct research and modelling on a variety of irrigated cropping systems in Australia, from the Murray-Darling Basin to the Lower Limestone Coast in SA and to the Midlands in Tasmania. Using a participatory process, the candidate will work with a team of experienced researchers but also will be involved in farmer surveys and extension of project results with grower groups.

The project will develop an economic calculator or similar, enabling whole-farm sensitivity analysis and taking into consideration factors including (but not limited to) price of water, irrigation layout, variable input costs and grain price to optimise farm scale returns from allocating available irrigation water to alternative crops. The project should address the following questions: 

  1. How does irrigation type (i.e. overhead laterals, flood irrigation and trickle) affect crop gross margins ($/ha) for a given water price? 
  2. How does water price affect crop gross margin (water demand requirements and timing)? 
  3. How does crop choice affect gross margin on a per hectare basis for a given water price?
  4. How does commodity prices affect crop choices for a given water price? 
  5. What is the relative probability that the predicted economic outcome will occur, i.e. what is the risk or confidence associated with various scenarios?
Eligibility
  • Applicants can be Australian or international citizens. Eligible international applicants must have an IELTS score of 6.5 or greater (tested within 12 months)
  • Research must be undertaken full time. The applicant must relocate and be able to live in Tasmania for at least 3.5 years
  • Must be physically fit to participate in field work in remote locations
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Experience with and knowledge of cropping systems/agronomy
  • Outstanding academic skills
  • High level of independence
  • Experience with modelling not essential but desirable
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Matthew Harrison for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Agricultural systems need to be profitable and sustainable in the short and the long-term and adaptive in the face of global climate change. These systems should embrace the spatial and temporal processes of agricultural landscape.

This project will develop agricultural system model by analysing and simulating environmental–agricultural data using spatial-statistical approach. At first, we prepare time-series Earth Observation data from space to estimate water use. Data preparation involves collating regional crop data for modelling. These data-sets will be examined against regional economic data and up-scaling will be applied to estimate profitability at farm level spatial analysis units. Next, we will develop a simulation model of ecosystem services considering the bio-physical provisions and C stocks. Finally, we will model the future land use where we consider climate projection in the long term.

The project results will provide a framework and operational tools. The framework will help us to understand the economic and ecosystem services aspects of irrigated agriculture in multiple-scales. The operational tools on:

  1. System analysis will provide simulations of current/future land-use changes in irrigated agricultural systems across scales, and
  2. Visualisation will provide assessment of regional ecosystem services to help decision-makers in formulating interventions and new water policies.
Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Agriculture
  • Soil and Water management
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Agro-meteorology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Hold a MSc degree
  • Knowledge of crop modelling, integrated water resource management and hydrological modelling
  • Demonstrate programming skills (R, Python, MatLab, etc.), ArcGIS application for generating spatial information, remote sensing and image analysis experience
  • At least 1 publication as first author in an international journal with (IF>2)
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jonathan Ojeda for further information.

Closing Date

30th September 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The cumulative experiences of a first calving followed by an abrupt separation from the calf, first interactions with older cows in an intensive and competitive grazing system, and first milking (and the corresponding close proximity to humans) make transitioning from the heifer herd to the milking environment a particularly stressful time in the life of a dairy cow.

The fact that these physical and social stressors are experienced simultaneously may exacerbate their detrimental effects on cow welfare and productivity. By removing or temporally shifting some of the stressors cows experience around their 1st calving the negative impact of the transition to milking cow may be reduced. Rearing more resilient heifers that are better prepared for integration into the milking herd may also improve the productivity of the worst performing animals in the dairy herd, and thus of the entire herd as a whole.

This research program will examine the effects of returning biologically relevant environmental and social complexity to the heifer’s rearing environment on the welfare and productivity of dairy heifers throughout rearing and into the 1st lactation.

Eligibility
  • The applicant will be based at the Cradle Coast Campus

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Megan Verdon for further information.

Closing Date

21st October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Growers need a fast, reliable infield means to measure soil NPK in order to manage fertilizer application in a timely, spatially cognisant, and efficient manner. Current soil testing is too slow and too expensive for either precision fertilizer management or reactive 'in crop'  fertilizer management. Whilst there have been major advances in analytical chemistry in recent years. Development of in-paddock nutrient analysis has been hampered by inability to extract a known soil solution from the soil. This project will prototype a mobile device for the extraction of soil water for chemical analysis, from both moist and wet soils. Our approach will apply an extraction fluid containing a tracer directly to the soil, which the 'soil sucker' a portable pumping device will then extract the soil water at known matric potentials and filter the extract ready for analysis. The focus of the research will be the development of the extraction device, and use of in situ extraction fluids and tracers to understand the providence of the soil water.

The project is seeking an exceptional candidate who has knowledge or the ability to acquire working knowledge of relevant aspects of mechanical engineering, soil physics, and analytical chemistry. Support will be provided to the candidate through joint supervision between TIA, Chemistry and Engineering. The PhD will be conducted as part of the CRC for High Performance Soils: Soil Smart Sensors project.

Eligibility
  • Drivers licence
  • Ability to perform field work on farm
  • High level of interpersonal communication skills, and ability to engage in robust conversations with peers

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • High achieving academic record in the field of either; soil science or analytical chemistry, or mechanical / electronic / mechatronic engineering
  • Demonstrated ability to develop practical, usable mechanical / electronic prototypes
  • Ability to rapidly acquire relevant working knowledge in the fields of engineering, soil physics, and analytical chemistry
  • Highly self motivated, inquisitive and creative approach to research and development
  • Ability to work in a multi disciplinary team, and integrate knowledge across multiple scientific disciplines
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Marcus Hardie for further information.

Closing Date

1st February 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

Campus

Cradle Coast

The Research Project

The project will explore the nexus between profitability, sheep and beef productivity, greenhouse gas mitigation and carbon sequestration of livestock businesses in an increasingly variable climate. The candidate will be required to conduct an integrated assessment including farm case studies in regions of Tasmania, including the Midlands and King Island. The study will identify farming systems adaptations that are profitable, environmentally sustainable and targeted towards future market opportunities.

Adaptation options will explore pasture feedbase including new legumes and grasses, animal genetics, new technology (e.g. virtual fencing) and management options, as well as options to capture value from emerging carbon markets. Through computer modelling data analysis and work with farmers, the project will inform future research and development investment in grazing systems with higher resilience to climate change and challenges across eastern Australia and provide a series of farm systems that can be used to either demonstrate or research options to raise profitability in each region.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge of agriculture, including livestock or pasture systems
  • Understanding of modelling
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

if requesting additional information from Dr Matthew Harrison, please also send your CV.

Closing Date

15th October 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Quality and provenance are key attributes desired by the market for Traditional Chinese Medicinal (TCM) Herbs. Wild resources are depleted and in rapid decline. Herbs are cropped domestically but these are relatively less desirable by the market.  

The overarching aim of this project is to understand the ecophysiology that underpins the growth and development in Tasmania of key TCM crops.  Lack of ecophysiological understanding can result in unexpected success when plants are transferred from environments that are quite distinct in terms of climates and soils.  Such understanding can inform management options that might include manipulation of light, soil moisture and fertility via site selection, infrastructure and cultural management. Understanding will be developed by investigating plant photosynthesis, water relations and nutrition physiology and informed by cultural manipulations that will lead to sustainable growing systems optimised for the market.

This project will sit within the UTAS 'Research Hub for Chinese Medicinal Herbs' and will involve close collaboration with our industry partner W&E Health as well as research partners South West University (Chongqing), Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine and the Chinese National Authority for Traditional Chinese Medicines (Beijing).

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Understanding of the general philosophy of Traditional Chinese Medicines
  • Experience and expertise in the study of plant ecophysiology
  • New crop and product development
  • Plant phytochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dugald Close for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Quality and provenance are key attributes desired by the market for Traditional Chinese Medicinal (TCM) Herbs. Wild resources are depleted and in rapid decline. Herbs are cropped domestically but these are relatively less desirable by the market.  

The overarching aim of this project is to understand the aspects of quality, with particular reference to (the sum of) phytochemical components, of key TCM crops that could, potentially, be grown and processed in Tasmania.  Wild Chinese ginseng, for example, commands premium prices relative to produce grown away from the native habitat. What differences exist? This project will relate the measurable properties such as phytochemical profile and physical attributes such as form, texture, colour and size of selected of Tasmanian-grown TCM crops, to the morphological, sensory and chemical aspects of premium quality wild herbs. The bioactivity of extracts will be investigated and the components that confer bioactivity will be isolated and identified. Great importance is placed on the post-harvest processing of TCM crops and yet there is a growing acceptance by the new generations of consumers for new modes of deliver, such as powders and capsules. Considering the logistical challenges in exporting from Tasmania to the market, quality and product development will be a key focal point.

This project will sit within the UTAS 'Research Hub for Chinese Medicinal Herbs' and will involve close collaboration with our industry partner W&E Health as well as research partners South West University (Chongqing), Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine and the Chinese National Authority for Traditional Chinese Medicines (Beijing).

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Understanding of the general philosophy of Traditional Chinese Medicines
  • Experience in plant chemistry and analysis
  • Applied statistics
  • Skills and experience in horticulture and/or supply and value chain analysis

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dugald Close for further information.

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