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From here you can shape the world.

Research is an integral aspect of the College, and our research degrees equip graduates with the skills, knowledge, confidence and connections to kick start, or further, their careers.

The College of Sciences and Engineering offers a diverse range of research degrees in each of our disciplines, from hard science to creative design.

We recognise the importance of academic and non-academic careers, and work closely with industry to cross-skill our graduates with real-world experience.

Our research degrees may see you travelling to Antarctica, testing cutting-edge technology in local micro-breweries, or designing new naval ships or sustainable housing. Choose a research degree from the University of Tasmania’s College of Sciences and Engineering.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Looking for undergraduate options?
Visit the 'Find a Course' page to explore our study options

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The sustainable offshore development of seafood and renewable energy production systems in Australia is crucial for the Blue Economy development. Included in these prospects for blue economy growth are multi-purpose offshore platforms/facilities (MPOP) which can be realised through co-location and/or integration of seafood and renewable energy production systems. Such co-location/integration would have several synergistic benefits, including shared resources, efficient use of ocean space, less competition amongst other user groups of marine space, reduced operational and maintenance (O&M) costs from possible shared activities and reduced impact on coastal environments and ecosystems. All these benefits can be achieved if an integrated/co-located MPOP can operate safely and reliably. However, because of different structural and operational specifications/limitations of the devices used for aquaculture and offshore energy production, the reliability assessment of the integrated/co-located systems is a challenging task.

An emerging field of research in reliability assessment of novel systems involves the use of the Digital Twins (DT) concept. The pairing of the virtual and physical worlds allows analysis of data and monitoring of systems to identify the problems before they even occur, preventing downtime. The DT utilises sensory data and physical models for replicating the structure and evaluating its reliability real-time. The concept has been adopted by the aerospace industry for years, for service-life management and optimisation of airplanes and space shuttles.

Implementing the DT framework however is not straight forward because of the different structural and operational limitations of the aquaculture and renewable energy devices integrated within an MPOP and the lack of structural monitoring guidelines. Solving this issue requires utilisation and coupling of different environmental, structural and failure models, optimal utilisation of different sensors etc. The physical models used within DT frameworks are not certain and there are different degrees of uncertainty associated with each one of them. Improper use of sensors for structural and operational monitoring also increases the uncertainty. Such uncertainties increase the risk of predictions obtained by a DT. This research intends to address the uncertainty within the DT components by means of risk-based reliability frameworks. The research project answers the following questions:

  1. What are the capabilities of the DT concept for reliability assessment of MPOPs?
  2. What are the sources of uncertainty within the models forming an MPOP DT?
  3. How to quantify the risk associated with the identified uncertainties?
  4. What is the cumulative impact of these risks on the predictions obtained by a DT framework?
  5. How is it possible to minimise and mitigate these risks?

The project contributes towards a safer and more reliable operation of MPOPs in both exposed high-energy offshore and nearshore environments.

Eligibility

Essential Skills

  • Completion of Australian Honours Degree with a First Class or 2A Honours (or internationally equivalent degree) in mechanical, civil or maritime engineering
  • Masters by research degree
  • Masters by coursework degree with at least 25% research
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full time basis

Desirable Skills

  • In-depth understanding of hydrodynamics and maritime engineering; solid knowledge of materials science
  • Proficiency in a programming language (eg MATLAB); previous experience in statistical/probabilistic modelling

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Vikram Garaniya for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) are attracting increasing attention and interest from all stakeholders in the global maritime community. While advocates of MASS remain optimistic about the benefits of MASS including safety improvement, cost reduction and environmental friendliness, significant regulatory gaps exist to deal with MASS-introduced risks that may not be adequately addressed by the current regulatory framework. Among the issues related to the regulatory framework, civil liability in the era of MASS is a common concern to many stakeholders in the global maritime community. The project aims to identify the regulatory gaps in re-defining civil liability under MASS and develop an integrated framework to clarify civil liability of parties involved in MASS. In doing so, industrial codes of practices relevant to MASS will be critically examined as to their effectiveness and appropriateness.

Eligibility

Essential Skills

  • Understanding of IMO Conventions, Codes and Regulations
  • Understanding of civil liability in the maritime context
  • Good communication skill
  • Good analytical skill

Desirable Skills

  • Knowledge about maritime autonomous surface ships
  • Graduated with an LLB or an LLM degree from a recognised university with distinction or with First-class Honours
  • Had academic publishing experiences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Jiangang Fei for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Global demand for efficient sea transportation has led to the evolution of large vessels worldwide. To capitalise in this efficiency increase, these larger vessels must manoeuvre in ever more confined waterways. Operating in such confined waterways creates unsafe transit for channel shipping. Additionally, extreme drought condition has led to the low water level in rivers and consequently has interrupted transportation not only by larger vessels but also by the current vessels which could safely passed through the rivers in the past. To provide safe transits, all possible vertical motions and draught changes should be considered. One of the sources of the draught change is the dynamic heel due to rudder deflection. Operating in the rivers requires to remain in the provided safe course and vessels' rudders are continuously in motion for course keeping purposes.

When a body moves in a circular path, there is a force towards the centre called centripetal force. In the case of a ship turning in a circle, the centripetal force is produced by the water acting on the side of the ship away from the centre of the turn. For equilibrium, there must be an equal and opposite force, which acts at the centre of mass (G). When a ship's rudder turns to port, the forces on the rudder itself causes a small angle of heel initially to port, however, the underwater form of the ship and centrifugal force on it cause a final static heel to starboard, and vice versa.

These two forces are coupled which tends to heel the ship away from the centre of the turn. Although a dynamic heel is developed during this coupling, the final static heel is usually taken into consideration. Neglecting dynamic heel is acceptable in waves due to the small ratio of this motion to the roll motion. However, in the case of calm water, particularly in rivers, canals and ports where there is restriction in terms of width and depth, the dynamic heel plays an important role.

This research project aims to investigate the effect of rudder deflection on the vessel's dynamic heel by three different methods of experimental, numerical and analytically solving equations of motion.

Eligibility

Essential:

  • The degree must be undertaken on a full time basis
  • Applicants must have already been awarded a first class honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Strong research and analytical skills, and be first author of at least two published (or accepted) high-ranked journal papers

Desirable:

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), hands-on experimental work especially in towing tank and model test basin, computer programming skills
  • Experience in Data Acquisition, Signal Processing and Machine Learning

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Naval architecture
  • Maritime engineering
  • Mechanical engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Javad Mehr for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Development of infrastructures to harvest renewable energy in offshore locations has gained increasing attention. To exploit renewable energy from offshore locations, different types of offshore structures are being proposed and built. Fixed platforms such as jacket structures are examples of platform employed in shallow water due to the lower cost of installation, operation, and maintenance. Fixed structures take advantage of supporting large deck loads, reliable stability, and little effect from seafloor scour. The continental shelf around Australia is relatively shallow, up of 200 meters deep. Fixed structures in the shelf can be used to support renewable energy production systems.

Offshore structures are usually subjected to more severe load conditions than those on the land. Among all loads, earthquake-induced loading has more severe consequences. Optimizing the remaining useful life of offshore renewable energy assets requires significant challenges incorporated with geotechnical perspectives such as cyclic loading of the foundation, the stiffness of the foundation, and accurate assessments of structural fatigue. Therefore, earthquake-based design criteria are essential to mitigate the risk of operational loss of renewable systems during seismic events.

This project aims to develop a holistic framework by integrating dynamic analysis and advanced machine learning methods to predict the performance of the structure exposed to progressive excitation loads including hydrodynamic effects. This research project will address the following objectives:

  • To develop a comprehensive methodology to analyse the dynamic strength level of the structure under seismic load,
  • To develop a well-defined methodology for accidental limit state function for progressive collapse of structures,
  • To develop a Machine Learning package for predicting resilience of given structures, and
  • To develop a risk mitigation strategy for the operational capacity of fixed offshore structures encountering earthquake loads.

The project will formulate the resilience of offshore fixed structures encountered during seismic loads using artificial intelligence. This mathematical based framework can contribute to solve the real-world problem related to the Blue Economy projects.

Eligibility

Essential Skills

  • The degree must be undertaken on a full time basis and applicants must have a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Proficiency with Machine Learning tool, Bayesian inference and CFD software
  • Be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Desirable Skills

  • Priority will be given to those who received first class honours for their bachelor degree and master by coursework course with research components and/or publications
  • In-depth knowledge of offshore structures, hydrodynamics and geotechnical engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Til Baalisampang for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

There is a growing need for implementation of artificial intelligence (AI) in procurement functions as it allows procurement departments to solve complex problems by using smart computer algorithms, generating effective innovation strategies. Digital technologies such as machine learning, deep learning, and neural networks can all be considered as AI which provides a wide range of opportunities for firms to bring innovations faster to the market.

The ability of the firms to drive innovations as new value-adding products and services can significantly affect their competitive advantages which cannot be successfully achieved without collaborations with their suppliers. Supply networks are potentially rich sources of ideas and innovation, and suppliers have been considered as the most important partners in the firms' innovation efforts. This emphasises the importance of procurement in assisting firms to access suppliers' innovation capabilities.

Best practices have indicated that AI applications in procurement functions can increasingly facilitate the innovation development process in different ways. For example, through automation and improvement of firms' search capabilities, AI applications provide procurement professionals with additional insights into identifying the highly innovative suppliers and analysing their role in developing more innovative products and services. However, research contributions in exploring the impact of AI applications on supporting procurement decisions for collaborative innovations are extremely limited. Therefore, there are huge potentials for focusing on procurement functions to stimulate supplier innovations in the era of digital transformation. In this regard, this project investigates the applications of AI in enabling procurement functions to leverage supplier capabilities for the innovation development process.

Eligibility
  • Deep understanding of supply chain management and procurement functions
  • Understanding of AI and related technologies
  • Evidence of high level written and communication skills expected for Doctoral study
  • Good analytical skills
  • Work or research experience in supply chain management

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Hadi Rezaei Vandchali for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Women are generally underrepresented in the STEM fields and in entrepreneurial ventures linked to high technology domains. This project will use the latest psychological and sociological research to propose a framework to facilitate that more girls and young women enter and remain in those STEM and entrepreneurial fields where they are significantly underrepresented. The framework will be designed to actively encourage creativity, inventiveness, and global awareness in harmony with the development of a socially responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial mindset. Strategies will be designed, tested and fine-tuned in diverse settings within the secondary and tertiary education sectors, and within the emerging Tasmanian STEM-based entrepreneurial ecosystem, respectively.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This research project aims to investigate the feasibility and technology potential of a compressed air energy storage (CAES) system that is associated with renewable energy and power systems. The specific research objectives include development of novel compressed air energy storage systems, investigation of dynamic performance of CAES system associated with the renewable energy and power systems and feasibility study of applications of CAES systems in Tasmania wind and solar power systems.

Eligibility

The applicant needs to have completed one of the following degrees in Mechanical Engineering or Energy and Power Engineering:

  • Australian Honours degree with a First-class or 2A Honours
  • Master by Research degree
  • Masters by coursework degree with at least 25% research component

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Xiaolin Wang for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project focuses on the development of an intelligent direct-current (DC) microgrid for offshore or open ocean aquaculture applications. The DC microgrid will be deployed for highly efficient integration of distributed generation and modern electronic loads. Particular attention will be given to the potential advantages of, and challenges associated with, implementing a DC microgrid in offshore environment. The successful candidate will be based at the University of Tasmania aiming to explore the different aspects of DC microgrids including design, modelling, control, coordination, communications, and management.

The project leader and primary supervisor will be Professor Michael Negnevitsky, UTAS. The commercial partners for this project will be Optimal Group Australia Pty Ltd and Pitt & Sherry.

Eligibility
  • Australian Honours degree with a First Class or 2A Honours or internationally equivalent degree
  • Masters by research degree
  • Masters by coursework degree, with at least 25% research component

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering
  • Electrical Power Engineering
  • Maritime Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Michael Negnevitsky for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Hobart based shipbuilder, INCAT, builds some of the world's largest and fastest high speed aluminium catamaran ferries. Critical to the success of INCAT's vessels has been their ability to operate at high speed in heavy seas, and INCAT's position as worldwide leaders in their market niche has been assisted over more than two decades by ongoing collaborative research with the University of Tasmania's School of Engineering. A long term goal is to optimise the ship structure, minimising weight without compromising integrity at critical locations. Past recent research in this area has sought to quantify the loads exerted during a slam (severe wave impact) event. Structural vibrations following a slam (known as "whipping") are known to significantly modify the internal forces as determined by a quasi static analysis, and their effect has been partially quantified through testing of a 2.5m hydroelastic model, full scale strain measurements, and dynamic finite element analysis. The current project aims to extend this work by relating the asymmetric slams and bending moments to the asymmetric design loads within the superstructure connecting the two hulls (referred to as "pitch connecting moment" and "split loads") whilst further quantifying the motions response in oblique sea directions. This has the capacity to influence international design codes and to provide a more rational framework for the determination of design loads in similar ships worldwide.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in shipping industry
  • Model testing experience in towing tanks or model test basins
  • Marine engineering or naval architecture academic background
  • Experience in use of Computational Fluid Mechanics and/or Finite Element Analysis

More Information

Please contact Dr Jason Lavroff for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus on obtaining an improved understanding of how best to design much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania. This research project will seek to:

  • Identify current ways in which Tasmanian middle-, high-, and senior secondary-school students may recognize possible existing educational pathways leading up to tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Characterize any existing conflicting messages (or misconceptions present) along those pathways that may discourage Tasmanian students from further exploring their potential interest in secondary or tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Jointly build with Tasmanian career counsellors, guardians and parents, principals, students, and teachers a suite of comprehensive, holistic, and inclusive perspectives on what future Engineering careers may entail;
  • Jointly design with Tasmanian Engineering academics and practitioners a suite of state-of-the-art field-tested tools so that they are better able to engage with their primary and secondary school counterparts;
  • Actively encourage multi-sector and multi-stakeholder collaborative involvement in the design, implementation, and evaluation of place-based mission-critical action-oriented strategies that lead to much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania; and
  • Embed the latest inclusion, diversity and equity research in the re-engineering of the education pathways that are the focus of this Ph.D. level work.
Eligibility
  • The applicant should have several publications indexed in the Web of Science (WoS)
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the WoS would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • WoS publications by the applicant as a first author will tend to attract extra merit points

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Bernardo Leon de la Barra for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The solid Earth changes shape over timescales of seconds to millenia and beyond as a result of forces within and on the Earth and gravitational attraction of the Sun and Moon. One of the breakthroughs of the last three decades is our ability to measure these deformations at sub-mm resolution using space geodetic techniques like GPS. Our ability to fully explain these observations is limited, however, by the sophistication of available numerical models and, to some extent, limits in our theoretical understanding of the Earth's lithosphere and mantle.

This project will advance our understanding of geodetic deformation measurements through the development of finite element models of thermal deformations of the Earth and geodetic monuments. It will directly lead to improved knowledge of how and why the Earth changes shape and result in improvements to precise positioning globally.

PhD students will gain a technical understanding of finite element modelling and geodesy, and broader skills in numerical analysis, data analysis, and oral and written communication. The supervision team publish in the leading engineering, geophysical, and geodetic journals.

The student will join a world-class team in geophysics, engineering, and geodesy. The University of Tasmania is ranked 5 "well above world standard" (the top ranking) in the Excellence in Research in Australia ranking 2018 in both Geophysics and Geomatic Engineering.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Engineering (particularly mechanical, civil or related), Mathematics, and/or Physics. Some experience in programming is highly beneficial

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found at Apply Now.

Information about scholarships is available at Scholarships.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus in obtaining an improved theoretical understanding of the time- and frequency-domain properties of fractional-order linear-time invariant single-input single-output control systems. Thus, the proposed research work will be conducted simultaneously in both the time- and frequency-domains and seek to more closely relate several fundamental concepts in each domain to others in the counterpart domain. In particular, this research project will seek to:

  1. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the time-domain features of their impulse and step responses;
  2. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the behaviour of the frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics of those systems;
  3. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their impulse and step responses;
  4. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their frequency-domain responses;
  5. Propose new fractional-order controller design methodologies for the closed-loop control of fractional-order plants that make use of the results obtained in parts a) to d).

Some of the fundamental time- and frequency-domain concepts which will be instrumental in progressing the proposed research include: extrema in the time-domain step responses, pole-zero patterns, and frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics.

Eligibility
  • The applicant should have a number of publications indexed in the Web of Science
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the Web of Science would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply: Engineering, Mathematics and Science 

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Bernardo Leon de la Barra for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In recent times, the growing demand for high-quality protein sources, coupled with technological advancements has facilitated a range of developments in offshore sea-cage aquaculture. From a structural engineering point of view, many of these advances have led to durable and cost-effective materials for the construction of fish pens, reliable anchoring and mooring systems, cost-effective and practical pen designs, and various computer systems for the monitoring of structural components.

However, as field conditions such as wave height and energy, geotechnical properties and depth of the seabed affect the performance of every offshore aquaculture system, the engineering design of the system is completely dependent on field conditions. This means there is no such thing as the best pen design, most suitable construction material, or most cost-effective and reliable anchoring and mooring system, as a generic engineering solution to all the challenges associated with field conditions. In fact, for every offshore aquaculture project, subject to the field conditions, one needs to analyse, validate, verify and ultimately choose the best combination of the structural components for this particular project.

The proposed research project will employ Combined Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and Finite Element Method (CSPHFEM) or other newly developed methods (such as the Hencky bar chain model) to simulate structural components of offshore aquaculture systems, as well as their soil-structure and fluid-structure interactions, while considering the effects of field conditions in both low- and high-energy areas.

The objective of this project will be to contribute answers to the following questions:

  • How does the sea hydrodynamics affect the integrity of the structure; considering various shapes?
  • Considering the geotechnical characterisation of the seabed, what are the most cost-effective and reliable anchoring and mooring systems?
  • What are the required collapse loads in different field conditions, should the pen construction material change?
  • Considering the energy intensity, what is the most reliable and optimum cage and anchoring design?

The results of multiphysics numerical simulation supported with our high-performance computing facilities will be validated against physical simulations at our model test basin, to offer realistic simulation of potential scenarios which ultimately helps stakeholders choose the suitable design, installation method, and construction material, and improve the efficiency, reliability and safety of a commercial-ready design for offshore aquaculture structures.

Eligibility
  • A solid knowledge of soil-structure and fluid-structure interaction
  • A solid knowledge of numerical modelling methods such as (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Finite Element and Computational Fluid Dynamics)
  • A solid knowledge of marine hydrodynamics
  • Knowledge of a programming language (e.g. Python and MATLAB)

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Civil, Mechanical or Maritime Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Ali Tolooiyan for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The State of Tasmania exhibits some of the lowest levels of educational attainment among Australia’s states and territories. This project will use the latest educational, psychological and sociological research to design practical research- and evidence-based strategies to enthuse Tasmanian children to fully engage during their schooling years. The strategies will collectively target and inclusively align the many stakeholders (parents, guardians, teachers, peers, career counsellors, etc.) that play a role in influencing children’s aspirations for a better and brighter future. The strategies will be designed, tested, evaluated, and fine-tuned in diverse formal and informal educational settings. The project will make use of trans-disciplinary and integrative learning approaches with a strong focus on bridging the gap between the STEM and STEAM domains.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Bernardo Leon de la Barra, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Wildlife roadkill is a world-wide issue being tackled by using a large array of mitigation methods that have variable efficacy. Tasmania has a significant roadkill issue, and several endemic species that are highly vulnerable to roadkill. One existing method of roadkill mitigation uses an electronic device that is triggered by a car's headlights at night, warning wildlife that a vehicle is nearby through flashing amber and blue lights and a high-pitched siren. These particular devices are manufactured in Austria and have been operating with apparent success in many European countries, reducing wildlife vehicle collisions with big game species such as deer and wild boar.

Between 2014 and 2016 a trial was conducted on the west coast of Tasmania to determine whether these European devices worked on Australian species, especially marsupials, many of which are threatened species. While the initial trial was set up simply to test the field efficacy of these devices, the success of the trial led to the results being published ("Roadkill mitigation: trialling virtual fence devices on the west coast of Tasmania", Australian Mammalogy, 2019, 41, 205–211). However, this trial was conducted at a single site with no replication, and a similar published study conducted on a highway close to Hobart for 3 months did not produce the same positive results ("A trial of a solar-powered, cooperative sensor/actuator, opto-acoustical, virtual road-fence to mitigate roadkill in Tasmania, Australia", Animals, 2019, 9 (10), 752).

The disparity in the results between the two studies has raised questions about the conditions under which these particular electronic devices work to optimal efficacy (e.g., road type, vehicle volume, vehicle speed, road undulation and curve, etc.), but also whether the specific light waves and sound waves used as the "alarm signal" are going to be more effective with some of our native species compared to others.

The broad focus of this PhD project is to determine whether there are ways that could make the existing devices more effective and species specific, thus reducing roadkill even more. The final aim will be to design, build and field-test a state-of-the-art (and hopefully low-cost) electronic device with wide-spread testing, at numerous sites in Tasmania, for a number of endemic species, and under a variety of scenarios (such as road type and vehicle speed, as mentioned above).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates.
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, such as a research Master's degree or a coursework Master's degree with a substantial research component awarded high marks, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.

Candidates with a Science, Technology or Engineering background are eligible to apply.

Please see the following web page for entry requirements: https://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now webpage.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Bernardo Leon de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The propulsive performance of an underwater vehicle is degraded by non-ideal operating conditions, including environmental disturbances and hydrodynamic effects resulting from vehicle motion. Whereas typical propeller operation involves a steady-state rotation speed, the implementation of a closed-loop control scheme that dynamically acts based on measured conditions can help to overcome these effects and improve the overall propeller response.

The aim of the project will to be to investigate the ability of novel real-time algorithms to control the behaviour of the main propeller of a generic underwater vehicle, improving its performance with respect to factors that may include maneuvering behaviour, energy usage and drivetrain reliability.

The project will involve a combination of modelling, simulation, and experimental validation. Using a dynamic model of a real-world marine vehicle propeller, novel control algorithms will be developed and demonstrated using an appropriate underwater vehicle simulation model. Furthermore, the control algorithms will be validated through implementation in hardware as part of an experimental trial to be undertaken in the AMC Towing Tank. An appropriate embedded hardware platform will be chosen and used to implement the controllers, which will then be tested using an existing experimental model based on the BB2 underwater vehicle with a generic propeller.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following discipline is eligible to apply:

  • Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Brian Salmon for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Currently, there are numerous methods and techniques aimed at extending the service life or repair existing structural elements. Bolting or welding of steel plates, applying CFRP and external prestressed tendons are the most common among these techniques. Nevertheless, these techniques have limitations and disadvantages such as increasing the self-weight of the structure, introducing stress concentration, reducing the fatigue lie of the structure or high labour and materials cost. Among the recently developed repairing and upgrading methods is the so-called Local Post-Tensioning (LPT) which increases the stiffness and the load carrying capacity of the structural member through adding reinforcing steel bars to a segment of the beam.

This project will be investigating the use of innovative strengthening and upgrading techniques (or their combinations) in order to extend the service life and restore the load carrying capacity of various steel, concrete or composite structural elements. The candidate will be using nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, experiments, or both to validate theoretical findings.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Civil (Structural  Engineering)

More Information

Please contact Dr Assaad Taoum to discuss prior to applying.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on defining optimum protein quality by determining essential amino acid requirements for juvenile topical and slipper lobsters. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the importance of between meal changes in tissue amino acid supply, balance and fluxes into growth or metabolism.

The research will combine established and cutting-edge methods to understand amino acid metabolism at multiple levels and specifically related to how well amino acid requirements are being met or not met. Classic factorial modelling of amino acid requirements will establish the base experimental approach. Advanced respirometry, combining oxygen consumption with carbon dioxide and nitrogenous excretion, will determine changes in substrate utilization within 24-h cycles and incorporate between meal changes in amino acid supply to tissues.

Protein turnover will be measured because it underlies growth, is strongly influenced by dietary protein quality (amino acid balance) and has high energy costs. Stable isotope tracking to the level of specific amino acids will be developed and provide further detail on metabolic pathways and specific amino acid retention efficiencies (e.g. Barreto-Curiel et al 2019). Targeted transcriptomics will then be used to understand how gene regulation relates to differences in amino acid fluxes. The research will ultimately help explain mechanisms that underpin differences in whole-animal growth efficiency and provide a detailed basis for feed formulation.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Oceanic fronts are sharp gradients between adjoining water masses and serve as mixing boundaries between water with different features (Belkin, 2009). Frontal processes, across a variety of temporal and spatial scales, operate in concert to drive coastal ecosystem structure and function. Climate change can have a profound effect on front formation leading to changes, which have important consequences for biodiversity. Furthermore, changes in concentration of one or a few 'leverage species' may result in sweeping communitylevel changes raising concerns about fishery sustainability, ecosystem health, and the maintenance of global biogeochemical cycles (Woodson and Litvin, 2015) in coastal regions. Conflicting studies show scenarios of both increasing and decreasing frontal probability due to climate change. It has been shown that there can a reduction in frontal frequency during warming anomalies. However, long term decadal-scale records show increasing trends of frontal activity. Regardless, the trend in front probability has not been shown to be globally uniform.

The first aim of this research is to comprehensively verify global trends of frontal frequency within global marine hotspots and resolve fine-scale frontal features (using new high-resolution satellite imagery) to assess patterns and trends in regional scale hotspot areas. Furthermore, given the variety of scales at which fronts operate, it is critically important to understand frontal activity at depth integrated submesoscales. As fronts play a role in driving local biological activity, unravelling the role of submesoscale dynamics on phytoplankton abundance and diversity is important for quantifying global influence on marine ecosystems.

The second aim of this research is to develop adaptive sampling algorithms for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to characterize submesoscale fronts across depth integrated measurements. When coupled with high resolution satellite measurements (above), unprecedented scales of frontal processes can be visualized.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of remote sensing algorithm development and satellite image processing
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The project will provide crucial insights into the effects of and role of kelp forests in adapting to and mitigating climatic change stressors. The project will test the role of Ecklonia and Durvillaea forests in dampening waves, and currents and buffering seawater pH to prevent the disruption of important coastal resources, for a range of patch sizes and environmental conditions. Furthermore, the project will investigate public perceptions of kelp forest ecosystems services. The results will be used to provide key insights into the use of natural habitats in climate change mitigation and adaptation policies.

Eligibility
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: marine ecology, engineering, quantitative ecology or quantitative social science, with an interest or experience in working across multiple disciplines
  • Scientific diving qualifications, experience in the use of statistical software (Matlab and R gui) are also desirable skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found at Apply Now.

Information about scholarships is available at Scholarships.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Beth Strain for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will explore the application of artificial-intelligence-based approaches to automation of the process of image annotation for seabed images collected with the aim of describing the cover and/or condition of key species (such as kelps and corals) or overall species biodiversity. It will utilise an extensive image annotation dataset developed by IMAS researchers across a range of applications to compare and contrast the latest developments in AI-based approaches to object detection, in their ability to automate reporting of the cover of key metrics and key species.

Eligibility
  • An Engineering Degree (Hons) level background with experience in object-detection methods applicable to imagery analysis
  • Familiarity with programming relevant to AI software and its adaptation, as well as automated reporting of outputs
  • Interest in marine biology/diversity and ability to work as part of a team, as the project will integrate with IMAS researchers working with imagery, CSIRO engineers working on AI methods, the Uni of Sydney Robotics team, and the IMOS UMI facility team

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Neville Barrett for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Temperate reef ecosystems in the inshore coastal zone are one of the most valuable and productive ecosystems globally. They are often dominated by macroalgae in the form of large, conspicuous kelp assemblages that underpin ecosystem function. However, they are also vulnerable to exploitation, with loss of ecosystem function due to organic enrichment one of the key challenges. Along with increasing pressure from coastal industry and urbanisation, aquaculture of Atlantic salmon is currently in a phase of expansion in Tasmania. To aid in the management of our coastal zone, we need to better understand how inshore reef systems will respond to potential changes to nutrients and sediments in the water column.

This PhD project will investigate biological pathways and processes for nutrient enrichment in temperate reef ecosystems with a particular focus on macroalgal communities. This project will examine biochemical and bacterial responses to increases in available nutrient, with outputs providing basic vital information needed to better understand environmental resilience and sustainability in these multi-use systems.

This PhD is a joint project with Thresholds for organic enrichment in temperate reef ecosystems and it is anticipated that the two projects will work closely together to achieve outcomes.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First-class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology or a related field of research
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Scientific diver qualification or the equivalent thereof
  • Experience in quantitative methods with knowledge of statistical software programs such as R and PRIMER

Desirable Skills:

  • First-author publication in international peer-reviewed journal
  • Knowledge of macroalgal communities in SE Australia
  • Experience in manipulative experiments in field and laboratory
  • Coxswains certificate, or ability to obtain one
  • Experience in biochemical or microbiological methods

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Camille White for further information.

Closing Date

1st September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

This project will support marine conservation and small-scale fisheries management throughout the Indo-Pacific region by developing novel strategies to incorporate data on fish movements into management decision making. The project will form part of ongoing research projects at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, providing exciting opportunities for the successful candidate to build an international network and impact real-world management decisions.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated skills or strong interest in complex quantitative and spatial data analysis
  • Strong interest in marine science, conservation planning and fisheries management
  • Strong communication skills (oral and written) and a keen interest in scientific publications
  • Willingness to learn programming languages (Matlab and R)
  • Demonstrated capacity to work independently

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Nils Krueck for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will be undertaken in association with a number of anticipated grants and contracted research that have yet to be finalised. This includes the new NESP2 Marine Biodiversity Hub, a Parks Australia community science grant application to develop ROVs as a monitoring tool, a developed, but not yet finalised project with Parks Australia to undertake a survey in the Tasman Fracture Marine park in summer 2020/21 (using BRUVS/ROVs and AUV), a survey of fish assemblages in the Huon and Freycinet AMPs for Parks Australia in summer 2021/22 (in discussion, awaiting commonwealth budget outcomes), and a component of the FRDC project establishing a monitoring program in Storm Bay as part of aquaculture expansion.

As the PhD will entail a subset of the individual survey components, and will be simply value-adding to current and proposed projects, there are no specific extra costs associated with it. All subsequent work will be desk-based analysis of the acquired imagery.

Eligibility
  • Sound knowledge of the core principles of coastal marine ecology and the physical drivers of ecosystems
  • A background in quantitative marine science or similar, such as the 3rd year quantitative methods unit offered by UTas/IMAS
  • Experience in operation of coastal vessels

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Neville Barrett for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD project supports the ARC Research Hub for Sustainable Onshore Lobster Aquaculture. The overall goal is to 'domesticate' one or more tropical seaweed species not previously grown in on-shore aquaculture, and test their suitability for integrated multi-trophic aquaculture with the rock lobster (Panulirus ornatus).

Eligibility
  • Experience in marine macroalgal (seaweed) nutrient and photosynthetic physiology
  • Experience cultivating seaweeds
  • Experimental design
  • Statistical analysis of data
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Catriona Hurd for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Marine environments are under increasing stress from organic pollution, generated from anthropogenic sources such as sewage outflows and aquaculture activities. In soft-sediment environments, organic pollutants can result in changes in the community structure of the bacterial and macrofauna communities (i.e. OTU or species density and richness and abundances of opportunistic or pollution sensitive species). This project will develop critical insights into how to effectively monitor organic pollution in the marine environment using newly developed molecular and functional approaches.

Eligibility
  • First class honours
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: marine ecology, quantitative ecology, molecular ecology with an interest or experience in working across multiple disciplines
  • Experience in field sampling, molecular ecology, and use of statistical programs including R gui

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Beth Strain for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

As part of fisheries management and biodiversity field projects, this student research will focus on fine scale delineation of dietary content of the giant crab by combining observational, morphological and molecular genetic approaches.  This information will then be used to elucidate habitat/fishing ground specific signatures that may assist in informing and managing this valuable fishery.

Conventional morphological and observation studies on diet in marine systems are not only logistically difficult to conduct and laborious but can be inconclusive. This is especially true where the animal in question feeds on carrion whose identification can be almost impossible using morphology. However, recent advances in DNA sequencing (and analyzing) has enhanced the capacity to identify constituents of diet, including from fecal material. This study will specifically explore the feasibility of employing DNA metabarcoding and its reciprocal validation with observational and morphological approaches to establish habitat/fishing ground specific dietary signatures of the giant crab.

Eligibility
  • A degree (MSc, honours) in fields related to marine biology, physiology or molecular biology
  • Advanced molecular biology (including NextGen sequencing and or genomics) and quantitative ecology skills are highly desirable, so is experience in crustacean biology. Quantitative skills and familiar with programming languages such as R or MatLab

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Sean Tracey for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) and in particular seaweed aquaculture has huge potential, with estimates suggesting this could be a $100M industry by 2025. This project seeks to support the development of a sustainable integrated aquaculture model and viable seaweed industry in Tasmania/ Australia by providing a more realistic understanding of the true economic value of this industry; identifying costs and benefits, including the intangible costs, and trade-offs so that managers and investors can make fully informed decisions.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or equivalent in Resource Economics, Human Geography, Natural Resource Management, Social Sciences, Environmental Science or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Background in multicriteria analysis and/or marine resource management or resource economics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will improve the characterization of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current fronts' variability and change. The analysis iscircumpolar with the observational and reanalysis datasets.

Eligibility
  • Strong background in Mathematics and Physics. Matlab or Python coding and shell scripting experience
  • Ocean dynamics, datasets analysis, ease with heavily computing based work

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Annie Foppert for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Humankind needs to remove 100-900 gigatons CO2 from atmosphere by the end of the 21st century to keep global warming below 2°C. This herculean task depends on the wide-ranging application of so-called negative emission technologies (NETs). Unfortunately, not a single NET has been proven to function at the gigaton-scale. One of the most promising ideas is to accelerate weathering reactions of minerals that consume CO2 when they dissolve (known as "Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement"). However, the desired consumption of atmospheric CO2 during dissolution would inevitably perturb the oceans with huge amounts of mineral dissolution products (alkalinity, Si, trace metals).

This PhD project will investigate if and how Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement could affect growth and metabolic rates of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for ~50% of primary production on Earth. The candidate will conduct a range of laboratory incubation experiments and participate in at least one international ship-voyage in the South Pacific. This enables us to cover phytoplankton from different biomes including key functional types, such as diatoms, cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. The overarching goal is to contribute, significantly, to the assessment of Ocean Alkalinity Enhancement as a tool to counteract climate change.

Eligibility
  • Honours or Master degree in biological or chemical oceanography or closely related field (e.g. environmental microbiology). Preferably experience with phytoplankton
  • Great abilities to work in teams and collaborative environments
  • Ability to spend extended periods abroad or on international research vessels during field studies
  • Enthusiasm for scientific discourse and progress
  • Fluent English skills
  • Very good writing skills
  • Reliable and highly motivated

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Lennart Bach for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Input from rivers and estuarine exchange on to the continental shelf plays an important role in altering physical, biogeochemical and ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. This input may influence stratification, nutrient flux, and local circulation patterns altering lower trophic levels and primary productivity. While previous studies have addressed general aspects of the structure and dynamics of river plumes, most of this work has focused on plumes formed by large and medium-size rivers. Little attention has been paid to small rivers plumes and estuarine exchange, largely because small plumes and estuarine exchange is highly dynamic and varies across short temporal (of order of hours) and spatial scales (1-10kms). This variability hinders precise measurements of plume structure and content even though small rivers influxes of fluvial water and suspended sediments is estimated at about 25% and 40%, respectively (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Milliman et al.,1999).

This project aims to advance our understanding of the role of small river plumes and estuarine exchange in driving the ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. Given the highly dynamic nature of small plumes, this work will employ a multidisciplinary approach encompassing satellite remote sensing, in situ sampling and hydrodynamic modelling to develop high-frequency, high-resolution products of physical and biological variables of plume structure and content.

Eligibility
  • Remote sensing, MATLAB, hydrodynamic modelling

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Andy Fischer for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Biofouling is a challenge for the aquaculture industry in Tasmania; limiting production outcomes by potentially restricting water movement through infrastructure, providing a vector for pests and pathogens, and additional complexity for harvest operations. As aquaculture moves offshore, the nature and behaviour of biofouling communities in these environments is relatively unknown. To develop successful management strategies it is essential to better understand the risk posed by biofouling in these new situations, in particular the species present and timing of fouling.

This project will provide the critical baseline data with which to understand how environmental conditions and farm management influence the composition and ecology of biofouling communities associated with salmon aquaculture around Tasmania.

This project is supported by the Blue Economy CRC, with further information on this program found here: https://blueeconomycrc.com.au/education/phd-opportunities/

Eligibility
  • First class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology or a related field of research
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Knowledge of hard substrate or biofouling assemblages
  • Experience in working with aquaculture industry
  • Coxswains certificate, or ability to obtain one

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Camille White for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will develop a new Gravest Empirical Model climatology of physical and biogeochemical watermass properties and use it to examine long-term change in Antarctic Circumpolar Fronts, and small-scale variability in Southern Ocean watermasses.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong mathematical background
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • High-level programming experience in Matlab, Python or equivalent
  • Good understanding of dynamical oceanography

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience working in a Unix environment
  • Experience working in a high performance computing environment
  • Ability to produce high quality graphics to illustrate results

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Nathan Bindoff for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The floating ice shelves around Antarctica play a critical role in its contribution to sea level rise, by restraining the flow of ice from the continent towards the ocean. These ice shelves often consist of a conglomeration of different materials, including meteoric ice, refrozen seawater (marine ice), and recent compacted snowfall. The structure of an ice shelf, and the properties of these different materials, can substantially affect its strength and future stability.

This PhD will use a range of methods including laboratory studies of ice samples, airborne geophysics data, and satellite remote sensing, to characterize the material properties and internal structure of an East Antarctic ice shelf, and to determine their implications for ice shelf stability.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Good scientific communication skills

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience in using GIS and/or processing remote sensing data
  • Experience in working with geophysical data sets
  • An understanding of glaciology and ice dynamics

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sue Cook for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) and in particular seaweed aquaculture has huge potential, with estimates suggesting this could be a $100M industry by 2025. This project seeks to support the development of a sustainable integrated aquaculture model and viable seaweed industry in Tasmania/ Australia by providing an understanding of the potential impacts of biofouling and how that might be affected by regional and temporal differences with a view to optimising site selection and husbandry practices.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology, or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Background in aquatic botany, environmental science or aquaculture

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Marine environments are under increasing stress from organic pollution, generated from anthropogenic sources such as salmon aquaculture activities. Globally, salmon aquaculture is developing rapidly in Tasmania and elsewhere. This could have significant benefits for the economy and coastal communities, but it is important that such growth is environmentally sustainable, well-regulated and socially acceptable in the local community.

To address these needs, salmon aquaculture companies are seeking to expand their production into more exposed locations, offshore environments and by co-culturing multiple species through the process of integrated multitrophic aquaculture. This project will for the first-time asses the social license and potential sources of conflicts of these three options (i.e. exposed locations, offshore and integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) at both government and industry level using four key case-study locations, Tasmania, New Zealand, Norway and Scotland.

Eligibility
  • First class honours
  • The successful applicant should have a background in one or more of the following fields: social science, policy, marine ecology with an interest or experience in working across multiple disciplines
  • Experience in surveys, interviews and participatory mapping

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Karen Alexander for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD will aim to quantify mineralisation of the exoskeleton of juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters as a function of endogenous (stored) and exogeneous (food and environment) mineral sources.

Mineral fluxes in crustacean around moulting signifies specific physiological adaptations particularly aiming at maintaining the acid-base homeostasis. It is a common knowledge that at the pre-moult stage, minerals are resorbed from the old cuticle and at post-moult stage, the new cuticle is mineralised.  Crustacea have some specific mechanisms to store resorbed minerals, particularly calcium from the old cuticle and which is made available to mineralise the new cuticle at post-moult. However, this endogenous source of mineral is not considered significant in marine crustacea due to it being readily available in the environment. Therefore, it is generally accepted that food and the environment are the main source for minerals in marine crustacea and the relative importance of these two sources are species dependent.

At present, the ability for juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters to store and reutilise resorbed minerals is unknown. Similarly, the relative contributions of minerals from food and the environment is as well unknown for these two species. A quantitative assessment of the three potential mineral sources (stored, food and environment) which makes up the exoskeleton is key to feed formulation. The PhD will employ a wide range of analytical tools to further understanding of the mechanism by which the acid-base balance in juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters is maintained

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Antarctic marine ecosystems provide ecosystem services that are important on a global scale, and there is a strong imperative to understand and predict the responses of these systems and services to current and future climate change. An implementation of the Atlantis end-to-end ecosystem model has been developed for the East Antarctic regions, and is well suited to exploring scenarios to evaluate potential climate change impacts on ecosystem structure and function.

In this project, the successful candidate will work with modelling experts to complete the calibration of the East Antarctic Atlantis model, and to the use the calibrated model to explore simple scenarios for ecosystem change. In the second part of the project, the candidate will update representation of sea ice and ice-dependent species in the model, and consider more detailed scenarios for change in sea ice habitats.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First class honours or masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming , and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience with C and R programming languages, ecosystem modelling, knowledge of Antarctic marine ecosystems and climate change

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sophie Bestley for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The oceans act as major sinks of atmospheric carbon. The biological pump is the ocean’s biologically driven carbon sequestration system. It has many pathways for sequestering carbon (e.g. gravitational pump and particle injection via midwater biota), however, understanding and linking these pathways is not easy and therefore has seldom been attempted. Often the models designed to quantify downward particulate carbon flux in the oceans lack information on key pathways and their parameterization may only focus on a limited number of these pathways. Development of a holistic model which links these ecological and biogeochemical pathways will provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of downward particulate carbon flux across the oceans. Such a model will enable researchers to track the oceans’ ongoing ability to sequester carbon in response to climate change.

This project will connect pathways for carbon sequestered by the biological pump in both subpolar and polar waters of the S. Ocean. By working closely with relevant experts who straddle midwater ecology and biogeochemistry, the successful student will bridge the gap between different areas of research to develop a truly ocean-wide downward particulate carbon flux model which importantly builds links between these two disciplines. The model will be used to establish a firm baseline on the magnitude of carbon sequestered by the biological pump which will enable us to detect future changes in the downward carbon flux due to climate change. By tracking carbon export will be able to see whether this flux is maintained, enhanced, or diminished in the subantarctic and polar S. Ocean in response to climate change.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong maths/statistical background
  • Strong analytical skills, especially with scientific analysis/programming software
  • Strong English written and oral communications
  • Demonstrated record of independent research (e.g. Honours, or Masters by Research)

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience in biological and ecosystem studies
  • Experience in biogeochemistry
  • Experience in Southern Ocean processes

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Philip Boyd for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

From temperate to tropical seas, the collapse of reef ecosystems represents one of the greatest threats for biodiversity and wild fisheries production worldwide. Concerningly, the recovery potential of collapsed reefs is poorly understood due to a lack of understanding of feedback mechanisms that can act to lock reefs into collapsed states. This project will address recovery potential for Australian reefs by quantifying rates of predation and herbivory on healthy to collapsed reefs.

The project will involve extensive SCUBA fieldwork to conduct standardised surveys and experimental assays to quantify rates of predation and herbivory for temperate and tropical reef communities. An explicit aim will be to identify the existence of unifying drivers of predation and herbivory, or idiosyncratic responses, across healthy to collapsed temperate and topical reefs.

Eligibility
  • High proficiency in scientific writing, data analysis
  • SCUBA certification + >30 hrs experience underwater
  • Experience running field experiments
  • Scientific diving qualification
  • Vessel license
  • Peer-reviewed publications, especially first author publication

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Scott Ling for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Set within a broader integrated strategy, encompassing genetic control, this Ph.D. project will build on historic capture data, daily age structure and reproductive traits at field sites on the southern (Tamar Estuary, Tasmania) and northern (Edgbaston reserve, Queensland) extremities of Gambusia incursions in Australia. This to assess population and incursion dynamics (including the scale of incursions) at the study sites, and if feasible, to develop broad-scale predictive models across the latitudinal cline, incorporating environmental data (e.g., temperature, photoperiod, pH and turbidity).

The study is expected to provide valuable information for designing suppression measures and managing invasiveness of G. holbrooki populations at the sites and for making predictions across the latitudinal bounds.

Eligibility
  • Honours or equivalent degree in Biology with specialisation is Fisheries or Fish biology
  • Experience in ageing fish, assessment of population parameters, population dynamics and quantitative platforms such as R and Python are desirable
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their entry level research degree (honours/masters), prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jawahar Patil for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

During the last glacial period, and during previous glacial periods of the late quaternary, atmospheric CO2 was 80 – 100 ppm lower than during interglacial periods, representing a potent agent of climate feedback. Changes in ocean carbon cycling, including increased biological carbon export and a decreased rate of ocean overturning circulation, contributed to carbon drawdown from the atmosphere during glacial periods. However, the relative importance of these mechanisms across the last glacial cycle, both temporally and spatially, remains poorly resolved.

Working within an international team, this project will explore ocean carbon uptake mechanisms in the poorly sampled southern Indian Ocean across the most recent glacial cycle. The student will analyse geochemical proxies of biological productivity and bottom water oxygen in a suite of sediment cores collected in 2018. The cores were collected from water depths ranging from ~1000 – 5000m, and present an opportunity to use past changes in carbonate preservation with depth to constrain deep ocean carbon storage. In the second year of the project there may be an opportunity to join a voyage to collect new sediment cores from the far southern Indian Ocean, on the Antarctic slope.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • This project requires a student with strong chemistry lab skills
  • A background in chemical oceanography, paleoceanography or geochemistry would be advantageous
  • Familiarity with quantitative data analysis approaches and tools, including scripting languages (Matlab/R/Python) is highly desirable

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof. Zanna Chase for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Like humans, microalgae and other plankton rely on bacteria – their unique microbiomes. Metabolically active microbiomes are essential for primary production in the ocean and contribute to development of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Imbalanced or depleted microbiomes can substantially alter the way they respond to environmental change, and lead to disease and/or death of the host plankton. Microbiomes differ substantially from the background seawater microbial community, but how microbiome bacteria are selectively recuited by the host cell, and the principles governing assembly of a consistent community structure, are largely unknown.

A PhD research opportunity is open for a talented graduate to join an ARC-funded project investigating plankton microbiomes. This project focuses on understanding microbiome recruitment and community assembly. The project combines microalgal physiology, synthetic microbiome models, and microbial community profiling using Next-Gen sequencing to track development phylogenetic and functional diversity of microbiomes, and how they contribute to marine biotoxin production.

The project will be supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch and Andrew Bridle and will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania in Launceston. The project also includes collaboration with researchers in Scotland (Scottish Association for Marine Science) and the USA (New York University).

Eligibility
  • Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in microbiology and/or molecular biology are encouraged to apply. Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found at Apply Now.

Information about scholarships is available at Scholarships.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Christopher Bolch for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The speed of Antarctic glaciers can vary substantially on tidal time scales. Using a combination of GPS observations and numerical modelling, this project will use glacier velocities to draw conclusions around ice shelf dynamics, the interaction of ice and its bed and the sensitivity of glaciers to changes in forcing.

Eligibility
  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent)
  • Demonstrably strong quantitative skills (mathematics and physics background)
  • Experience in coding/programming, particularly using Fortran
  • Understanding of glaciers and ice sheet behaviour
  • Experience in software development

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sue Cook for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Multi decadal ice-core records of key atmospheric chemical and aerosol species provides us with an important opportunity to evaluate how well new-generation climate-chemistry models perform. Constraining these atmospheric species is an important step in improving the accuracy of the aerosol-cloud-radiation system within our climate models.

In this project, the candidate will use ice-core observations of several key atmospheric chemical and aerosol species, including hydroxyl, dust, organic carbon, black carbon and methane-sulfonic acid to evaluate and test the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) model with full chemistry.

The candidate will need good computing skills including knowing a programming language such as python and experience working in a UNIX environment and preferably have experience in using large climate data/climate models. Good written and oral skills and an Honours/Masters degree in Atmospheric Science or equivalent STEM field are also required.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Programming skills such as python
  • Unix environment/bash scripting experience
  • Good communication skills (written and oral)
  • Honours/Masters in Atmospheric Science or other STEM degree with the relevant knowledge (maths, physics, chemistry)

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience handling large data
  • Experience using climate model output (eg. netCDF file formats)
  • Experience running a climate model

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Delphine Lannuzel for further information.

Closing Date

30th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The Blue Economy will see significant investment in offshore marine and maritime industries. This project seeks to develop the robust marine spatial planning (MSP) tools to ensure this offshore development is sustainable - providing jobs, food, economic growth at the same time as supporting the ecosystem processes essential for the planet.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or Masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems and MSP concepts and tools
  • Background in multicriteria analysis and/or marine resource management and policy frameworks
  • Specific experience in MSP development and implementation
  • Experience in applying spatial analysis and mapping approaches for management and decision support systems (e.g. Marxan/MarxanWithZones, Ecospace, Atlantis, EMDS, Mara, ArcMap and R Programming)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This Ph.D. will aim to identify potential disease-causing agents in onshore lobster culture systems. With the intensification of lobster culture there is the suggestion that many putative pathogens will emerge that are yet to be identified or their associated diseases observed and reported.

Biosecurity is an essential aspect of this emerging aquaculture industry and it is vital to ensure that cultured lobsters are healthy to ensure the sustainability of lobster aquaculture. The closed-nature of onshore RAS provides the ability to monitor and treat all inputs and outputs to the system.

This research will use portable real-time third generation nucleic acid sequencing to characterise the microbiota of the tropical rock lobster (TRL) rearing system to provide a baseline as to what microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic microbes) are associated with the culture of healthy lobsters. This will allow the detection and identification of known and unknown pathogens that may enter the system or opportunistically impact the culture environment. It is envisaged that detailed knowledge of the microbiota and the ability to archive this information for future interrogation will lay the foundations for and allow onshore RAS lobster aquaculture to set a new standard for aquaculture biosecurity.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Despite relatively few diseases having been reported in the culture of tropical rock lobster (TRL) one colloquially termed white leg disease (WLD) has emerged as a recurring and potentially devastating health problem often resulting in significant losses of larval TRL. Research at IMAS has identified the aetiological agent of WLD as Aquimarina sp. TRL1 while health strategies to mitigate the threat posed by WLD are yet to be developed.

Biosecurity is an essential aspect of this emerging aquaculture industry. To ensure the sustainability of lobster aquaculture the use of living organisms or natural substances that prevent or reduce damage caused by harmful organisms otherwise known as biological control or biocontrol is preferred to traditional antibiotic treatment and potentially hazardous chemicals. Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria and are one of the most promising biocontrol agents. Predatory bacteria such as Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) are Gram-negative, obligate predators of other Gram-negative bacteria and like phages are potential biocontrol agents.  Research into biocontrol to treat and or prevent WLD will form the basis of a PhD project and focus on the use of bacteriophages, and predatory bacteria (BALOs) as a health management strategy to prevent WLD.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Do you know how important Antarctic sea ice is for the global climate? Neither do we (nor does anyone else!). But we do know that sea ice plays a key role in the global ocean's uptake of 90% of the heat trapped on the planet by anthropogenic emissions, so this is an important question. We are looking for a motivated, creative individual with strong quantitative skills to tackle that question, as part of a world-class team oceanographers and sea ice experts.

The successful applicant will use data from the state-of-science climate models that are used to inform IPCC reports, to investigate how Antarctic sea ice affects the circulation of the Southern Ocean, how well those processes are represented in the models, and the global implications of those processes in a warming climate. Over the course of the project, the student will communicate their research in top tier scientific journals, and at domestic and international conferences.

Eligibility
  • Bachelors degree (with Honours) or Masters degree in a Mathematical or Physical Science discipline- Strong mathematical skills
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills in English
  • Demonstrated experience in individual research (e.g. Honours thesis, Masters dissertation)
  • Experience using a high-level scripting language for data analysis/visualisation (e.g. Python, MATLAB, NCL)
  • Experience in analysis or ocean, atmosphere or coupled model output

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Will Hobbs for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Temperate reef ecosystems in the inshore coastal zone are one of the most valuable and productive ecosystems globally. They are often dominated by macroalgae in the form of large, conspicuous kelp assemblages that underpin ecosystem function. However, they are also vulnerable, with loss of ecosystem function due to organic enrichment one of the key challenges. Along with increasing pressure from coastal industry and urbanisation, aquaculture of Atlantic salmon is currently in a phase of expansion in Tasmania. To aid in the management of our coastal zone, we need to better understand how reef systems will respond to potential changes to nutrients and sediments in the water column. This PhD project will investigate resilience in macroalgae dominated reef systems with regard to pathways and processes of nutrient enrichment.  The overall objective of this project is to determine ecosystem thresholds in relation to biologically meaningful change.

This project is supported by a Tasmanian RAC scholarship through the SMRCA, with a top-up stipend of $5000 per annum available in addition to the post-graduate award.

This PhD is a joint project with Biological mechanisms for nutrient enrichment in temperate reefs and it is anticipated that the two projects will work closely together to achieve outcomes.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First-class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology or a related field of research
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Scientific diver qualification or the equivalent thereof
  • Experience in quantitative methods with knowledge of statistical software programs such as R and PRIMER

Desirable Skills:

  • First-author publication in international peer-reviewed journal
  • Knowledge of macroalgal communities in SE Australia
  • Experience in manipulative experiments in field and laboratory
  • Coxswains certificate, or ability to obtain one

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Camille White for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The project has its focus on high resolution modelling of paleo ocean and its impact on ice sheet retreat through paleo ice shelf melting.

Eligibility
  • This project will suit candidates with a strong numerical background such as quantitative physical science/engineering
  • Computer programming skills would be advantageous for the analysis of simulation results.

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found at Apply Now.

Information about scholarships is available at Scholarships.

More Information

Please contact, Chen Zhao for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Quantifying the distribution and variability of phytoplankton abundance in the global oceans is a formidable challenge that has generated numerous instruments and approaches – all with their respective advantages and disadvantages. In the Southern Ocean, cloud cover frequently hampers satellite assessment of chlorophyll concentrations (Chl), and fluorescence sensors mounted on autonomous platforms may overestimate chlorophyll concentrations by up to a factor 8 (Roesler et al. 2017, L&O Methods, 15(6), 572-585). Confident estimates of global ocean productivity are similarly hampered by a lack of information regarding the physiological status of phytoplankton.

In this project, the successful candidate will explore data from optical instruments on moorings and biogeochemical Argo floats as well as satellites to improve estimates of Chl and of the physiological status of phytoplankton in the Subantarctic Southern Ocean. Most of the work is based on existing data, but oceanographic field work is a possible component of this project.

Eligibility
  • First-class Honours or Masters equivalent research in a quantitative physical or biological science or engineering
  • High level of programming experience, preferably in Matlab, R or Python
  • Interest in ocean optics and phytoplankton photophysiology
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Familiarity with ocean biogeochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Christina Schallenberg for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Antarctic Bottom Water plays an important role in global ocean circulation and climate and yet its formation is also highly sensitive to climate change. This project will contribute new knowledge on the sensitivity of Antarctic Bottom Water to climate change. You will help collect new sediments cores during a voyage to Cape Darnley, East Antarctica, in early 2022, and integrate sedimentological and geochemical proxy data to assess the history of Cape Darnley Bottom Water formation during the last glacial cycle.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Taryn Noble for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This study will investigate the dynamics, causes and structures of marine heatwaves from a Lagrangian perspective and proposes to develop a methodology to predict marine heatwaves on multiple timescales for the benefit of marine fisheries and ecosystem managers.

Eligibility
  • The equivalent of a Bachelor of Science Honours degree (first class or equivalent)
  • Background research in physical oceanography, atmospheric science or climate science; experience with coding in MATLAB or python; experience handling climate data in a Linux environment; demonstrably strong quantitative skills (mathematics and physics background)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Neil Holbrook for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Carbon sequestration is the long-term storage of carbon on land and in the ocean. In the ocean, the biological gravitational pump was thought to be solely responsible for the transport of carbon from the surface waters to depth. However, it is now recognised that other processes are involved including particle injection via midwater biota. An important, yet understudied, component of this is the mesopelagic migrant pump which can lead to substantial amounts of carbon being actively transported to mesopelagic depths through the vertical migration of micronekton. Micronekton are free-swimming, taxonomically diverse, pelagic animals around 2-20 cm in size and comprise of some of the most abundant animals in the oceans. Micronekton contribute to the transport of carbon by feeding in the shallows and egesting C rich faeces in the deep. However, little is known about exactly how much carbon they transport.

This project aims to investigate the role micronekton play in sequestering carbon in the Southern Ocean. By linking ecosystem studies and biogeochemistry the successful student will use data and samples collected during the AAPP 2020/2021 SOLACE voyage to quantify carbon export by micronekton in the Southern Ocean. These data will be used as input into a carbon flux model for the Southern Ocean. Critically, this work will better link Southern Ocean midwater ecology and biogeochemistry.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong biological and ecological background
  • Strong biogeochemistry background
  • Strong analytical skills, especially
  • Strong English written and oral communications

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience with microscopy
  • Experience with zooplankton/micronekton identification
  • Experience in ecosystem modelling
  • Experience in laboratory analysis

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Philip Boyd for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Giant Crab Fishery (GCF) is looking for ways to improve stock management. A lack of quality stock assessment data has led to increasing uncertainty in the population of crabs. This project is pioneering a new method of collecting quality data for use in population models that can more accurately assess the state of the fishery. Using Visual Intelligence, a combination of visual processing and machine learning, images of Giant Crabs can be used to collect size, sex and unique ID of individuals.

The successful applicant will assist in the development of image capture process that will eventually be trialled within the GCF. They will also develop models using Visual Intelligence to retrieve crab data from the images. It is hoped this data gathering process will be rolled out in southeast Australian GCF and assist in the sustainable management of the industry.

Eligibility
  • A degree (MSc, honours) in fields related to information and communication technology
  • Machine learning and Data analysis (highly desirable)
  • Programming (familiar with at least one of the following programming languages: Python, C/C++, Java, .NET, MATLAB)
  • Computer Vision (optional)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Scott Hadley for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Associate Professor David Beynon invites expressions of interest from those thinking of undertaking a PhD into the cultural, historical and compositional dimensions of architecture.

Dave’s research involves investigating, and adaptations of architectural content and meaning in relation to urban renewal, migration, and multicultural/intercultural aspects of architecture and built environments.  Areas of possible thesis investigation within the project include:

  • Architecture, migration and changing built environments
  • Alternative Architectural Histories, particularly in relation to notions of modernity and postcoloniality
  • Inter-Regional Architectural Futures: Analysing parallels between Tasmania and other Asia-Pacific locations
  • Digital Heritage: Developing modelling and visualisation technologies for interpreting and visualising ancient and historic architectures
  • Ex-Industrial Built Environments: Developing the cultural and practical re-purposing for a post-industrial future.

Explorations may employ historiographic, discursive or creative methods. Depending on your individual research topic, potential co-supervisors may include: Dr Georgia Lindsay; Dr Helen Norrie; Dr Mark Sawyer; Dr Louise Wallis; Professor Julian Worrall

If your topic brings a specific interdisciplinary focus to the above area, co-supervision might also include academics from Geography and Spatial Science, Information and Communication Technology or Arts and Social Sciences.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

While candidates from other disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in architecture, urban design, urban planning or related social sciences. Depending on which area of investigation you are focusing on, background in cultural studies, digital modelling, archaeology or particular regional studies may be advantageous
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof David Beynon for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In this project, we study how mediation of the built environment works in peripheral places. We do this as a gentle counterpoint to meta narratives of the global media city characterised by placeless flows of information, and to literature directed toward 'global' cities and spectacular works of architecture. We test how notions of media, image, and place play out in the real world: not in cosmopolitan megalopolises like Tokyo, London, and New York, but in ordinary, peripheral places that many people and communities still occupy. An example of work in this realm is available here.

Your PhD work will be part of this larger project considering this nexus of media, place, and architecture, and will contribute to a collaborative research lab considering how architecture and media practices intersect to shape, frame, and communicate ideas about peripheral places.
You will have the opportunity to author a chapter or section in a book project.

Interested applicants should send a short proposal detailing a contemporary case study (or pair of comparative case studies) from anywhere in the world. Email your proposal and CV to georgia.lindsay@utas.edu.au and mark.sawyer@utas.edu.au by the closing date.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated excellence in written and visual communication
  • Background in a relevant domain

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Georgia Lindsay and Dr Mark Sawyer for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Since 2006, the internationally recognised and nation leading thermal and hygrothermal research from the University of Tasmania, has provided technical guidance for Australian regulatory and policy development. This has included technical advice for the Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme (NatHERS), the Australian Building Codes Board, State Governments and Industry.
Some of the most critical considerations for zero-energy and net-zero carbon buildings include:

  1. Building envelope thermal performance
  2. Whole of building hygrothermal performance
  3. Construction material hygrothermal performance
  4. Whole of building life cycle assessment
  5. Whole of region GIS informed planning.

However, international research has identified that some overly focussed methods for a low carbon future, may actually be creating interior environments that promote the occurrence of short-term and life-long cardiovascular and respiratory human health conditions.

The research within the hygrothermal research team at UTAS focusses on this nexus between the need to move toward a more productive and zero carbon future combined with providing durable, long-lasting and healthy interior and exterior environments. Within this research field, prospective students will evaluate and use world leading tools to develop a deep technical understanding of building physics and provide new knowledge to inform ongoing guidance to Government and Industry.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates. Scholarship recipients must enrol on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must have established skill in programming and building physics as they relate to building thermal performance and building simulation
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Mark Dewsbury for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Processes of financialisation and marketisation produce collective norms and ideas of public 'common sense, as well as contradictions and schisms. In this context, this research project will consider the possibility of economized disruptions and dissent – disruptions and dissent that emerge within, rather than outside of economization. This can include big or small political moments that bring about radical re-orderings at micro or macro scales. It will contribute to understanding and facilitating the change required to address climate catastrophe and associated socio-political challenges.

Eligibility
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in human geography
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Kate Booth for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Tasmania hosts a number of endemic Gondwanan species that live for hundreds to thousands of years.  These species have been instrumental in developing long climate reconstructions for the Southern Hemisphere. These reconstructions are heavily based on statistical evidence of seasonal climate sensitivity, but evidence suggests that reliance on these statistical approaches may be in critical need of reappraisal.  This is necessary in light of contemporary changes in climate that are likely to impact plant growth in ways that are not currently fully understood. In order to understand these changes and their implications for interpretation of palaeoclimate data extracted from tree rings, much finer resolution information on growth response to climate is required.  At the same time, climate change poses a significant threat to these species, yet relatively little is understood about their detailed responses to climate, and hence, their resilience to short-lived extremes and longer-term trends in climate variables.  Some species, such as Huon pine, are extremely sensitive to water availability.  Evidence also suggests that heat is likely to be an important driver of changes in the growth response of species such as the Tasmanian endemics.

This PhD project is interdisciplinary and will span palaeoclimatology and plant physiology. It aims to improve our understanding of the responses of tree species to climate, including responses to climate extremes, through high-resolution monitoring of growth across multiple sites and species. The successful applicant will work with a palaeoclimatologist (Geography, Planning and Spatial Sciences: (https://www.utas.edu.au/technology-environments-design/geography-and-spatial-sciences) to apply new understanding to climate reconstructions from the properties of tree-rings of these species and with a plant physiologist (Plant Science, in Biological sciences: https://www.utas.edu.au/natural-sciences/biological-sciences ) to interpret impacts of climate on the species and their geographical distributions. Through this project, the successful applicant will develop high level programming and statistical analysis skills, the ability to obtain detailed physiological information from plants. By traversing traditional disciplinary boundaries, the successful applicant will also develop a broad collaborative network that can be expected to provide multiple avenues for further work.

Eligibility
  • Undergraduate degree and Honours/Masters in geography, biological sciences or a related discipline
  • Evidence of good quantitative research skills and programming skills (e.g. R/Matlab/Python)
  • Evidence of ability to work both independently and as part of a team
  • Excellent communication skills, high level of proficiency in English
  • Ability to undertake field work in remote locations

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Kathy Allen for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The solid Earth changes shape over timescales of seconds to millenia and beyond as a result of forces within and on the Earth and gravitational attraction of the Sun and Moon. One of the breakthroughs of the last three decades is our ability to measure these deformations at sub-mm resolution using space geodetic techniques like GPS. Our ability to fully explain these observations is limited, however, by the sophistication of available numerical models and, to some extent, limits in our theoretical understanding of the Earth's lithosphere and mantle.

This project will advance our understanding of geodetic deformation measurements through the development of finite element models of thermal deformations of the Earth and geodetic monuments. It will directly lead to improved knowledge of how and why the Earth changes shape and result in improvements to precise positioning globally.

PhD students will gain a technical understanding of finite element modelling and geodesy, and broader skills in numerical analysis, data analysis, and oral and written communication. The supervision team publish in the leading engineering, geophysical, and geodetic journals.

The student will join a world-class team in geophysics, engineering, and geodesy. The University of Tasmania is ranked 5 "well above world standard" (the top ranking) in the Excellence in Research in Australia ranking 2018 in both Geophysics and Geomatic Engineering.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Engineering (particularly mechanical, civil or related), Mathematics, and/or Physics. Some experience in programming is highly beneficial

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found at Apply Now.

Information about scholarships is available at Scholarships.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Social connectedness, support, and safe, local places in which to meet, nurture, and maintain those connections make important contributions to individual, family, and community health, resilience, and wellbeing. On that basis, governments at all levels, and private and community and health services have designed and funded programs and safe spaces to help create and practically support belonging and connectedness, and foster community wellbeing.

Their services often target specific cohorts to support those in certain age, socioeconomic, or diversity groups in particular communities and localities. However, communities also have informal groups and relationships, support networks, and carved-out safe places that embody aspects of connection, belonging, identity, and emotional and practical nurturing and support that these more formal structures seek to create and emulate. Such networks may not be discreet and specifically targeted and nor are they necessarily funded or structured. Rather, they emerge from and form part of the everyday life of community and place and, as such, stretch and flex across time, space, and life-courses.

The aim of this study is to identify such a network and, using qualitative and interpretive methods, to interview participants in that network and analyse the complex interplay of community, place, and context; gain an understanding of the attributes, dynamics, and geographies of such informal and taken-for-granted place based connections that support individual and community resilience and flourishing; and consider how these change over time and space. The outcome will be an enhanced understanding of the complexity and multifaceted nature of such networks, including potentially transferable lessons in how to enhance more formally conceived and created place and community-based programs.

Eligibility
  • First class or upper second honours
  • Publications or evidence of submitted manuscripts
  • Background in social research
  • Competency in use of qualitative data analysis tools
  • Evidence of capacity to manage projects on time and budget

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Human geography

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Elaine Stratford for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Antarctica continues to deform as a result of past and present surface loading changes, especially ice loading changes, and Earthquake-related effects. Over the last 10 years, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been increasingly deployed in Antarctica to measure surface deformation. These data are now yielding sufficiently precise surface velocity time series to be able to separate competing models and in doing so learn new things about the interior of the Earth and the past ice loading history.

This project will focus on the analysis of GPS data with state-of-the-art techniques in order to better understand the deformation of Antarctica. It will apply novel techniques to remove time series noise and compare these to numerical models developed from existing codes and from outputs provided by third parties. These results will be important for understanding present-day ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise and in gaining fundamental understanding into the interior of the Earth. The project will provide students with advanced skills in numerical analysis, interpretation and presentation.

Eligibility
  • Applicants with strong research and analytical skills in the following disciplines are invited to apply

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Physics or Applied Mathematics
  • Quantitative Earth Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Geodesy (not Surveying or GIS)

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Matt King for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Climate and weather extremes are rare and may constitute unexpected, unusual, severe and/or unseasonable events. Some extremes occur over weeks, seasons, or even years and their impacts may, along with catastrophic events like fire and flood, be captured in palaeoclimate records. Impacts of extremes may be spatially and temporally limited or may represent what are known as compound climate extremes.  Compound climate extremes are an emerging field of research and can be categorised as preconditioned (prior conditions accentuate hazard impacts), multivariate (associated with multiple drivers), temporally compounding (successive events have an extreme impact), or spatially compounding (hazards occur in multiple locations simultaneously). Instrumental evidence and climate projections indicate increased frequency and magnitude of both single event and compound extremes over recent decades and into the future, respectively. The impacts of more frequent or severe climate extremes and the failure of climate adaptation and mitigation are perceived as major threats to social and environmental well-being across the globe.  The IPCC has characterised compound extremes in particular as an area of 'deep uncertainty', with little understood about their probability of occurrence or cascading impacts.  There is an urgent need to better characterise extreme climate events to better inform emergency responses, infrastructure design and land management planning.

This PhD project will focus on analysing climate extremes from a compilation of records that is developed during the project. This compilation will draw on globally gridded data sets and instrumental records at scales commensurate with types of climate extremes that may be recorded in palaeoclimate records such as corals, tree-rings, speleothems, sediment cores and ice cores. The project will play a key role in improving our understanding of extremes. This dataset will be used to calibrate a record of palaeo-extremes that you will compare with long runs of CSIRO's climate model to identify likely drivers of temporally and spatially compound events in the palaeoclimate record. You will be located in the School of Geography, Planning and Spatial Sciences (https://www.utas.edu.au/technology-environments-design/geography-and-spatial-sciences) and will work within the dynamic Climate Futures Group (https://www.utas.edu.au/sciences-engineering/research/climate-futures). The project will require extensive collaboration with researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, CSIRO (https://research.csiro.au/dfp/ ), and colleagues in the Northern Hemisphere. It will also require a willingness to engage with large-scale databases. The project will provide a student with excellent communication skills, a wide collaborative network and advanced skills in numerical analysis and interpretation relevant to climate sciences generally.  These skills underpin future leadership roles in the climate sciences.

Eligibility
  • Undergraduate degree and Honours/Masters in geography, mathematics, biological sciences or a related discipline
  • Evidence of excellent quantitative research skills and familiarity with programming language (e.g. R/Matlab/Python)
  • Familiarity with at least one type of palaeo-proxy archive
  • Evidence of ability to work both independently and as part of a team
  • Excellent communication skills, high level of proficiency in English

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Kathy Allen for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In a changing world, insurance and how households use and think about insurance is changing. For example, climate change is dramatically changing insurability. Housing trends are also informing underinsurance patterns. This research project examines the social and culture geographies of insurance, and critically interrogates changes unfolding from the perspective and experience of households. It contributes to understanding the role and power of insurers and insurance, how insurance and socio-ecological change can co-produce inequities and inequalities, and the action required to enable adaptive and just insurantial outcomes.

Eligibility
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in human geography
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Kate Booth for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Economic and financial processes can appear abstract and universal in their constitution. In this research, you will explore the socio-spatial variegations of economic and financial discourses and practices. This may include collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data on household decision-making, experiences and perceptions. It will contribute to nuanced place-based understandings of the co-production of 'money', people and place, including the identification of new and emerging socio-spatial patterns of inequity and inequality.

Eligibility
  • Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in human geography
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Kate Booth for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Facial Emotion Recognition is the process of identifying human emotion, most typically from human facial expressions. AI-based facial emotion detection can be applied in a variety of fields such as Driver Fatigue Monitoring, Marketing, and Entertainment. Driver Fatigue Monitoring employs facial emotion detection to determine whether a driver is in a state of fatigue so as to appropriately intervene in the behaviour of the driver to avoid possible accidents. Advertisers and market researchers try to use consumer emotional engagement with digital content, such as videos and ads, to create the best ads and optimizing media spend.

The popularity of deep learning approaches in the domain of emotion recognition may be mainly attributed to its success in related AI applications such as Computer Vision. Well-known deep learning algorithms include different architectures of Deep Neural Network (DNN) such as Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). Deep Neural Networks have increasingly been employed to learn discriminative representations for automatic facial emotion recognition with some success, however, certain significant issues remain unresolved. Such issues include: Occlusion-robust and pose-invariant issues; Dataset bias and imbalanced distribution; Optimal DNN parameter set; Multimodal effect. In this project, you will develop new deep learning algorithms to overcome these and possibly other issues for faster, more reliable, and more accurate facial emotion detection.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Shuxiang Xu for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

As learner interaction in an online educational environment leaves a lot of digital traces behind, vast data sets of students’ online activities are available, which is known as Big data. Data and analytics in education, teaching and learning has attained great interest, resulting high-quality research into models, methods, technologies, and impact of analytics in education area. Big data and learning analytics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) is greatly extending the power of computers to revolutionise education sector. Educational data mining techniques discover meaningful patterns in these large datasets to create probabilistic and predictive models such as student success algorithms, understand and optimise learning and the environment. Learning analytics and AI are not panaceas for addressing all the issues and decisions faced by higher education but become part of the solution to enhance and transforms the way to support learning process.

The aim of the project is to investigate the deployment of AI techniques and analytical model/algorithm for improving learning analytics and for discovering the meaningful patterns in the large datasets of students to improve educational processes.

Eligibility
  • Experience with programming
  • Critical thinking

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

8th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Haptic technology is also widely used in education to enhance student's learning experiences with anatomy as it allows physical interaction with anatomical structures  (Kup-Sze, Hanqiu & Pheng-Ann 2003; Reid, Shapiro & Louw 2018; Yeom et al. 2013). It is evident that AR and haptic technologies encourage student learning of anatomy through exposure of the body visually by 3-D modelling, and physically with tactile feedback. There is a huge educational potential to apply AR and haptics in education of anatomy. However, it has not yet been widely researched or evaluated.

The purpose of the proposed research is to investigate the use of interactive 3D anatomical simulation, used in conjunction with haptic feedback, to determine if it improves students' learning. The research will compare the effectiveness of the combination of AR and Haptic technology to their use independently, as well as comparing it to existing learning methods, such as 2D images and interactive resources (CD/DVD).

The research will be undertaken into four stages:

  • Generation of interactive 3D anatomical models in a mobile device;
  • Applying haptic feedback when a user touches/interacts with the 3D models;
  • Integrating the simulation of AR with haptic feedback);
  • Comparison and Evaluation of effectiveness of AR/haptic education in anatomy against existing methods.
Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Knowledge graphs (KGs) are large networks of entities and their semantic relationships.  It has been widely applied in multiple areas, including information retrieval, situation awareness and recommender systems. A KG can be represented as a set of triples (h, t ,r) in which h (head) and t (tail) are entities (nodes), and r (relation) is  the relation (edge) between the two entities. KG embedding is to represent the entities and relations in a continuous vector space. This is a critical process to make KG semantic meaningful and machine understandable, and normally achieved by using machine learning methods. Negative sample generation is an important process for KG embedding. It provides sufficient training samples for the KG embedding, and fill the vector to a continuous space.

KG was first designed to formalize unstructured natural language data. With the development of KG techniques, researchers are now exploring the use of KG in other domains, especially IoT, Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Cybersecurity. However, traditional KG mining and KG embedding methods have been mainly focused on NLP data, and are not suitable for the latest applications. This project will investigate the limitations of existing KG embedding and mining methods, and design novel algorithms that can mine KG data more effectively and handle the dynamics from complex application domains.

  1. Yongqi Zhang, Quanming Yao, Yingxia Shao and Lei Chen, NSCaching: Simple and Efficient Negative Sampling for Knowledge Graph Embedding, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1812.06410.pdf
  2. Yantao  Jia, Yuanzhuo  Wang, Xiaolong  Jin, Hailun  Lin, Xueqi  Cheng , Knowledge Graph Embedding: A Locally and Temporally Adaptive Translation-Based Approach, ACM Transactions on the Web (TWEB), 2017
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer science
  • ICT
  • Mathematical sciences
  • Electrical engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Given the important challenges associated with the processing of brain signals obtained from neuroimaging modalities, fuzzy sets, neural networks and evolutional systems have been proposed as a useful and effective framework for the modelling and understanding of brain activity patterns as well as to enable a direct communication pathway between the brain and external devices (brain computer/machine interfaces). However, most of the research so far has focused on lab-based applications in constrained scenarios, which cannot be extrapolated to realistic field contexts. Considering the decoding of brain activity, the computational Intelligence models, including fuzzy sets, neural networks, and evolutional computation, provide an excellent tool to overcome the challenge of learning from brain activity patterns that are very likely to be affected by non-stationary behaviours and high uncertainty. The application of computational Intelligence methods to learning and modeling​ has recently demonstrated its remarkable usefulness for coping with the effects of extremely noisy environments, as well as the variability and dynamicity of brain signals. Additionally, neurobiological studies have suggested that the behaviour of neural cells exhibits functional patterns that resemble the properties of intelligent computation to encode logical perception. This paves the way for developing new computational intelligence techniques based on intelligence abstractions that foster the capabilities for modeling and understanding brain function from a quantitative point of view.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a {Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research} degree.

The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Selection Criteria

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Foundational programming skills
  • Statistics

More Information

Please contact Zehong Cao for more information.

Closing Date

1st October 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Trust is a term used in many fields, including computer science, and has many different meanings [1] [2]. In this project, trust is used to generate some expectation of success in a collaboration between two separate entities/agents. Most of trust models assume single and homogeneous trust relationship between agents [3}. However, most of these models cannot handle dynamic environments.

Contextual information plays important roles in trust evaluation. Especially as ground truth is not available in many complex environments, trust is closely related with contextual factors including social relationships among entities, spatial temporal information, features and types of services, etc. To overcome some limitations in existing trust mining approaches, in the research we will investigate how to utilize contextual information in trust mining and develop a robust mechanism which can allow more accurate and reasonable trust evaluations.

In this project, the student will propose a context-aware trust model, which can take contextual information into trust analysis. The proposed model will be applied in open dynamic environments, and to improve collaborations among agents with different capabilities and skills, i.e., heterogeneous. Simulation-based experiments will be conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed model.

References:

  1. Marsh, S.P., Formalising trust as a computational concept. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Stirling, Apr. 1994.
  2. Sabater, J. and C. Sierra, REGRET: reputation in gregarious societies, in Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Autonomous agents. 2001, ACM: Montreal, Quebec, Canada. p. 194-195.
  3. Tang, J., H. Gao, and H. Liu, mTrust: discerning multi-faceted trust in a connected world, in Proceedings of the fifth ACM international conference on Web search and data mining. 2012, ACM: Seattle, Washington, USA. p. 93-102.
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Information and Computing Technologies

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Quan Bai for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Blockchain is a technology to store data securely and transparently using distributed and crypto techniques. It is a data storage of the future with security, immutability, and transparency built-in. With such an evolutionary feature set, blockchain has currently gained traction in its adoption ratio. However, the required momentum to take this technology to the future is still lagging due to the core limitation of its inability to interoperate between heterogeneous and multiple chains.

Considering this an opportunity, in this project, we will research to find the resolution to the blockchain interoperability challenge that enables arbitrary data sharing among heterogeneous and multiple blockchain networks.

The current block in the chain is highly specialized and designed to handle transaction-oriented records; consequently, limiting the possibility of flexibility and extensibility required to achieve an interoperable distributed data structure. Therefore, for general-purpose storage and sharing of arbitrary data, the block structure needs to be generalized with schema-based definitions to allow global data interpretation. Therefore, in this project, we will research on devising a markup-like meta-structure definition scheme to represent a generic data block structure within a blockchain network. Furthermore, a possible markup-translation algorithm that can facilitate arbitrary data exchange among multiple and heterogeneous blockchains.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In this project, HDR students implement and develop of state-of-the-art machine learning and deep learning models, especially in deep reinforcement learning algorithms to easily train intelligent agents for various games. The research goal is to speed up the learning process of multiple agents and allow each agent receives higher rewards in a game scenario. These trained agents can be presented in the demo workshop and can be used for multiple purposes, including testing of game builds and controlling behaviour.

In this project, we used the OpenAI Gym and Unity platform, which have been developed for creating and interacting with simulation environments. Specifically, the Unity ML Agents Toolkit is an open-source Unity plugin that enables games and simulations to serve as environments for training intelligent agents. This project will use this toolkit to develop dynamic multi-agent interaction, and agents can be trained using reinforcement learning, imitation learning, neuro-evolution, or other machine learning methods through a simple-to-use Python API.

Additionally, this project is mutually beneficial for both students and AI researchers as it provides a central platform where advances in AI can be evaluated on rich environments and then made accessible to the industry and research developer communities.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidate from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply
Selection Criteria
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zehong Cao for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Deep Learning recently lends itself extremely well to the research in computer vision domain where hierarchical structures of computational neurons can learn predictive features to effectively make predictive decisions. For example, in health care, deep learning is becoming also popular among medical imaging researchers who are looking for great tools to process a large number of images produced by scanners.

The impact of this to the society is potential and attract more and more attention from health care experts who have been looking for better methods to reduce the error rates in diagnosis. However, the most common deep learning models used for image processing are CNN-based which is a complex black-box consisting of millions of parameters that confused the experts of why the decisions are made. As a result, there is an increasing scepticism from those who do not want to use deep learning because of the lack of explainability.

In this research, the student will improve the transparency of deep neural networks to provide insights of the decision-making process. The topics of interest are (but not limited to):

  • Medical imaging (eye disease detection, knee pain prevention, etc.)
  • Visual reasoning, image captioning
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Son Tran for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Due to the advent of technologies such as 5G and IoT, the increase in network traffic has been exponential; consequently, presenting a larger set of opportunities for intrusion attacks on network traffic. Furthermore, the complexity and nature of these attacks can surely go undetected as they can easily be impersonated as normal behaviour (For example, DoS - Denial of Service attacks).

Due to high levels of work intensity and frequent turnovers, it is impractical for an organisation to leverage human intervention; especially, early-career engineers as the nature of this work requires higher understandings of hacking techniques.
In this project, we will conduct research that utilises Machine Learning to develop a model that can be applied to practice using payload detection in real-world Intrusion Detection (IDS) and Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS). The targeted high detection rate of our model will significantly reduce the network payloads that need to be verified; consequently, overcoming human dependency.

Furthermore, we will devise a distributed methodology via Blockchain to detect not only network attacks but also intrusions based on abnormal behaviours that can be easily missed by an engineer. This methodology can be a novelty for Collaborative Intrusion Detection Systems (CIDS) to detect attacks such as Denial of Service (DoS) with high accuracy.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the past decade, blockchain has been one of the most revolutionary technologies that will have a far-reaching transformational effect across almost every industry in the coming years. A lot of organizations are examining its benefits for the sake of industries such as healthcare, law enforcement, asset management, forestry, agriculture, voting, and notarization. Given that every organization needs to share data, knowledge and assets; blockchains necessarily need to interoperate with each other.

Blockchain interoperability not only means the possibility to share and exchange, digital assets and arbitrary data but also to reference chain code across heterogeneous and multiple blockchain networks. However, the smart contract/chain code in a blockchain can be written in several different languages, thus, limiting the possibility of code reusability among blockchain networks.

In this project, we will conduct research to devise a chain code virtualization methodology for an interoperable blockchain ecosystem where the scale of execution of smart contracts is beyond a single block or a single chain deployment. Thus, enabling a new generation of distributed applications that can be built on the aggregation of smart contracts, written in different languages, like workflows and orchestrations

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Research and/or Development background in the areas of Blockchain, software architecture and distributed systems
  • Understanding of distributed application Development pertaining to Blockchain
  • Publication record or relevant industry experience

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Information Technology
  • Computer Engineering

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Muhammad Bilal Amin for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Understanding the genetic basis for changes in plant form and function during crop evolution is a major challenge in agriculture, and has multiple applications in fundamental plant biology, crop improvement, and the history of agriculture. Legumes are a large group of plants that include important global staple food crops such as pea, bean, soybean, lentil and chickpea. Several of these are also major export crops for Australian agriculture. However, legumes are in general much less well studied and understood than their more prominent counterpart cereal crops, such as wheat, rice and maize.

This project will investigate the genetic control of key domestication and adaptation traits in one or more legume species. It comprises (i) genetic analyses (ii) the isolation of genes contributing to domestication and/or adaptation (iii) molecular and physiological studies, and (iv) characterization of genetic diversity. It aims to apply recent improvements in sequence resources and global germplasm collections and aligns with externally-funded research projects and international collaborations.

The project is expected to result in fundamental advances in the understanding of the molecular basis for crop domestication and adaptation in plants, insight into the molecular evolution of these traits, and the development of tools and insights useful for breeding.

Eligibility
  • A first class Honours or MSc degree in a relevant discipline such as plant science
  • Demonstrated knowledge and research experience in areas including but not limited to molecular biology, genetics, and plant physiology
  • Proven record of strong written and verbal communication skills
  • A high level of motivation and attention to detail

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Jim Weller for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Timber harvesting and fire can have substantial impacts on native plant communities, especially for rainforest-associated species. The impacts are expected to vary between species and with disturbance type, intensity and frequency. This project will contribute to a large ARC Future Fellowship study investigating the complex trade-offs involved between biodiversity conservation and timber production. The responses to management of numerous species of plants will be linked with timber yield/revenue across contrasting management systems in a large landscape ecology study. The research aims to guide forest policy by determining the optimal mix of reserves and management to maximise plant conservation outcomes in landscapes available for timber production.

Fieldwork plans will be aligned to the larger project to survey biodiversity along a disturbance/age gradient. The candidate will contribute to other aspects of project conceptualization. There may be opportunities for global collaboration to compile/analyse datasets of forestry impacts on plants; the project will involve some advanced data handling and statistical skills.

This PhD project will help develop the candidate's skills in critical thinking, project management, fieldwork, data management and analysis, writing and communication. It will prepare the student for future careers in research, or with government or non-government land management or conservation agencies.

Eligibility
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Proficiency with statistical analyses, e.g. in R. Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS) and background in multivariate community analyses would also be desirable
  • Fieldwork experience; fit, able, and willing to work in remote field areas, sometimes in difficult conditions and basic living arrangements
  • Current driving licence
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • A good understanding of ecology or conservation biology and interest in contributing to biodiversity conservation
  • Species identification capacity (ability to learn bird species identifications rapidly – good audio-visual memory required)
  • Ability to both work independently and to collaborate and work effectively as part of an interdisciplinary team, including supervising volunteer field assistants and liaising with land management agencies

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Zoology
  • Forest Sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sue Baker for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Phenology, or the timing of developmental changes during the growth cycle, is the single most important trait for crop adaptation. Large yield losses typically occur when critical periods for grain set and filling coincide with environmental stresses, chiefly drought and extreme temperatures in Australia. Photoperiod and temperature are the main drivers of phenology but recent evidence indicates that soil water content can also modulate phenological development in grain legume (pulse) crops. For example, both faba bean and chickpea show genotype-dependent effects of soil water content on flowering, and accounting for these can improve prediction and modelling.

This project sits under the umbrella of a $4.75M GRDC-funded national pulse phenology project and will explore the physiological mechanisms that underlie these effects. Specifically, it aims to:

  1. Quantify the effects of water on reproductive phenology in chickpea and lentil
  2. Quantify interactions between water, photoperiod, temperature and genotype
  3. Explore the physiological and genetic basis for effects of water on pulse phenology

The candidate will gain skills in field and laboratory phenotyping, crop physiology and genetics under the supervision of Victor Sadras (SARDI, University of Adelaide) and Jim Weller (UTas). The position will be physically based at the Waite Campus in Adelaide.

Eligibility
  • A first class Honours or MSc degree in a relevant discipline such as plant science
  • Applied knowledge in areas including but not limited to plant phenology, morphology, development and  stress relations
  • Strong background in data analysis and interpretation and proven record of written and verbal communication skills
  • A capacity for regular field work outdoors and in remote locations
  • A  current driver's license
  • Working experience with lentil and/or chickpea, plant phenotyping and computing software will be viewed favourably

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Jim Weller for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Lentil (Lens culinaris) is an important grain legume crop and staple food throughout western Asia, northern Africa and the Indian subcontinent, and a significant export crop for Australia.  The environmental control of phenology (the timing of flowering and related developmental changes) is a key factor underlying adaptation of lentil to different latitudinal, seasonal and climatic environments. Although the genetic basis for flowering time is increasingly well understood in many crops, including legumes, little is known about the genes and genetic loci that influence it in lentil.

This project sits within a large GRDC-funded national pulse phenology program based at UTas, which aims to define the genetic basis for phenology adaptation across current and potential future Australian growing regions.  The project will contribute to the genetic dissection and physiological characterization of flowering time control in lentil, through glasshouse, molecular and computational analyses.  It will involve close collaboration with the lentil genomics and breeding program at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and interaction with the Australian pulse breeding and research community. The project is expected to result in fundamental advances in our understanding of an important crop trait, and the development of tools and insights useful for breeding.

Eligibility
  • A first class Honours or MSc degree in a relevant discipline such as plant science
  • Demonstrated knowledge and research experience in areas including but not limited to molecular biology, genetics, and plant physiology
  • Proven record of strong written and verbal communication skills
  • A high level of motivation and attention to detail

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Jim Weller for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Beetles are known to be sensitive to habitat modification by timber harvesting and wildfire. Beetle species vary widely in dispersal ability, feeding guilds and habitat requirements. Thus different approaches to plantation and native forest logging could have varying impacts on beetle communities. This project will contribute to a large ARC study investigating the complex trade-offs involved between biodiversity conservation and timber production. It will investigate the characteristics of species that are resilient to particular management practices vs. those that are detrimentally impacted. The responses of numerous beetle species will be linked with timber yield/revenue data across contrasting management systems in a large landscape ecology study. The research aims to determine the ideal mix of reserves and management to optimise invertebrate conservation outcomes. Fieldwork plans will be aligned to the larger project to survey biodiversity along a disturbance/age gradient. The candidate will contribute to other aspects of project conceptualization. There may be opportunities for global collaboration to compile/analyse datasets of forestry impacts on invertebrates.

The candidate will develop skills in critical thinking, project management, fieldwork, data analysis, writing and communication. It will prepare the student for future careers in research, or with government or non-government land management or conservation agencies.

Eligibility
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Proficiency with statistical analyses, e.g. in R. Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS) and background in multivariate community analyses would also be desirable
  • Fieldwork experience; fit, able, and willing to work in remote field areas, sometimes in difficult conditions and basic living arrangements
  • Current driving licence
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • A good understanding of ecology or conservation biology and interest in contributing to biodiversity conservation
  • Species identification capacity (ability to learn bird species identifications rapidly – good audio-visual memory required)
  • Ability to both work independently and to collaborate and work effectively as part of an interdisciplinary team, including supervising volunteer field assistants and liaising with land management agencies
  • Previous publication of research in international peer-refereed journals is desirable

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Zoology
  • Forest Sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Sue Baker for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

This project has been put forward to be considered for The High Family Scholarship in Tasmania Devil Research. Eligible applicants may be assessed for this scholarship. Please visit here for more information about this scholarship.

The Research Project

Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are threatened by two independently evolved transmissible cancers, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD, first detected in 1996) and devil facial tumour 2 (DFT2, first detected in 2014). During DFTD's epidemic history, tumour-host evolutionary interactions resulted in genetic and phenotypic adaptations, leading to the development of defence mechanisms against infection, such as tolerance and resistance. This suggests that DFTD is transitioning from an epidemic to an endemic disease, a key component of host-pathogen coexistence. However, the recent emergence of DFT2 poses a new challenge for the conservation of the species and has the potential to re-shape ongoing adaptations to DFTD, leading to an evolutionary arms race between tumour types and devil populations.

The project aims to quantify the effects of tumour lineages on infection dynamics and spatial spread of transmissible tumours in populations co-infected with DFTD and DFT2. The devil/DFTD/DFT2 study system provides a unique opportunity for integrating modern genomic tools for studying pathogen phylodynamics with fine scale spatial and temporal epidemiological data to the management of infectious diseases. It also represents a valuable model system to quantify how wild populations adapt to infectious disease outbreaks, and more specifically, to oncogenic processes.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates, however, Tasmanian or Australian students are encouraged to apply
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants from variety of disciplines are eligible to apply

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Rodrigo Hamede Ross for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Sex-determination controls the largest variation within animals—the division into males and females. While the different systems of sex-determination—involving genetic or environmental control—are fairly well understood, transitions between these systems remain enigmatic in evolutionary biology.

This project aims to address this gap by revealing the molecular change required to transition between systems, using one of only two known lizard species exhibiting both genetic and temperature control of sex. This knowledge will have important implications for species conservation, facilitating predictions of highly biased sex ratios under climate change, plus potential commercial applications for species where production of one sex is favoured.

Eligibility
  • Experience in bioinformatics and DNA sequence analaysis

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Christopher Burridge for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

There is an opportunity for one PhD student to work on an ARC Discovery Project aimed at addressing the low resolution of 3D printed microfluidic structures. 3D printing can create bespoke 3D structures within a fraction of time and cost compared to traditional fabrication. However, its scope in chemistry has been limited by the low resolution of the 3D printed components. Hence, this project will utilise a state-of-the-art 3D printer to develop high-resolution 3D printed microfluidic devices, which would enable the fabrication of high-performance micro total analysis systems (µTAS).

This PhD project is only open for applicants who can commence on-shore.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Material Science

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Vipul Gupta for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Novel separation technologies and materials will be developed to contribute to filling the methodological gap for the measurement and understanding of the behaviour of nanoplastics in the environment.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Fernando Maya Alejandro for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

There is an opportunity for one PhD student to work on an ARC Discovery Project aimed at addressing the chemical susceptibility and biotoxicity of 3D printed devices. 3D printing can create bespoke 3D structures within a fraction of time and cost compared to traditional fabrication. However, its scope in chemistry has been limited by the poor chemical robustness and biotoxicity of the 3D printed components. Hence, this project will develop a new approach to coat 3D printed parts with a solvent and biocompatible metal layer that will broaden the applications of these parts in chemistry and may facilitate the fabrication of new point-of-collection devices.

This PhD project is only open for applicants who can commence on-shore.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Surface Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Analytical Chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Vipul Gupta for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project involves developing a novel synthetic methodology for the synthesis of nitrogen containing complex molecules.  The method will utilise heterocycles as templates by exploiting their reactivity to build up chemical complexity.  This protocol would permit the efficient access to numerous compounds from a common intermediate, an approach that is desirable in any synthesis, but particularly for producing chemical libraries as required for drug discovery.  Targets include the stemona alkaloids stenine, stemoamide and croomine which posses complex molecular architecture and proposed as the active agents in many traditional medicines.

Eligibility
  • Honours or Masters degree in Synthetic Organic Chemistry

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Synthetic Organic Chemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Jason Smith for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

There is a living allowance scholarship of $28,597pa (2021 rate, indexed annually) for this project for 3.5 years with no extension, that will be considered for an outstanding applicant.

The Research Project

The project will develop new materials based on an under-explored class of weak interactions known as halogen bonds. These interactions will be used to assemble large molecules in solution, probe the presence of pollutants in water, and to develop catalytic systems for organic reactions.

The project will involve collaborative research with groups in the fields of computational chemistry. Successful candidates will make use of modern synthetic chemistry, analytical techniques (including NMR, MS and IR), and examination of the target molecule properties by chromatographic, stereochemical and crystallographic techniques.

Eligibility
  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates and must be undertaken on a full-time basis

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • A background in synthetic inorganic or organic chemistry
  • Computation chemistry experience is desirable

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Scholarship Assessment Criteria
  • Demonstrated research experience
  • An interest in supramolecular chemistry
  • High intrinsic motivation to complete a PhD
  • Evidence of self directed learning/research
  • The ability to work independently and as part of a team
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Nathan Kilah for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is focused on designing and engineering novel transition metal-based catalysts to establish unprecedented chemical reactions. The potential of these processes to establish new modes of small molecule activation and develop novel synthetic methodology will be explored. The results of this project may lead to the establishment of new strategies for the rapid and direct synthesis of important classes of organic molecules, including natural products and their derivatives.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Organic synthesis
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project involves the screening of endemic Tasmanian plants to discover new and valuable compounds that can be used to lead drug discovery. By employing a practical pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) method developed in-house, a range of plants will be extensively screened to determine their chemical profiles. The identification of plants containing significant quantities of organic molecules that can facilitate semi-synthesis and/ or feature chemotaxonomic value will also be pursued.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Synthetic organic chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Structural characterisation techniques including NMR, IR and MSA

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

30th May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Application of nanomaterials (NPs) in SPME, in combination with 3DP technology for fabrication of integrated lab-on-chip (LOC) devices, are going to create a new revolution in chemical analysis. An important class of highly porous NPs is metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), which have attracted a lot of interest, due to their unique capabilities, like thermal stability, large surface area, and highly regular and permanent porosity.

This project aims to develop a microfluidic-based SPME chip, using MOF composites, for sample clean up. It will be directly couple with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for subsequent analysis. It will be very beneficial for proteomic analysis.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants with chemistry backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Analytical Chemistry, Nanochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alireza Ghiasvand for further information.

Closing Date

30th May 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

SPME is a promising solvent-free sample preparation method that can merge extraction, preconcentration, and derivatization into a single step and therefore is suitable for monitoring PCFs. However, because of the complexity of the environmental samples, the SPME sorbent must be selective to compensate for the matrix effect.

Accordingly, this project aims to synthesize novel classes of micro-sorbents for selective and more efficient extraction of PFCAs and PFSAs in soil and water samples. They will be coated on fused-silica or metallic fibres and used for SPME applications for trapping of volatile or derivatized PCFs. To achieve reliable and feasible analytical strategies, optimization of the extraction process will be performed using multivariate statistical analysis and experimental designs, which are broadly employed to search and optimize the efficiency of affective variables to enhance performance and minimize the error of experiments in different research areas.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants with chemistry backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Analytical Chemistry, Nanochemistry

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Alireza Ghiasvand for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2022*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the absence of a magnetic field, certain molecules can retain magnetisation; they exhibit a hysteresis (or a lagging) in the magnetisation below a certain temperature. The term Single Molecular Magnet (SMM) has been coined to describe such molecules. The origin of the magnetic hysteresis is not from long range magnetic ordering as seen in classical magnetic materials, rather is intrinsic to the molecular features of the molecules. The best lanthanide SMMs are usually based on monometallic complexes. However, radical bridges have been used to provide a very strong interaction between the unpaired electrons in the contracted 4f orbitals in dinuclear lanthanide complexes. This project involves the synthesis of new dinuclear complexes involving the verdazyl ligand.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rebecca Fuller for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In early 2022, the RV Investigator will collect sediment cores at Havre, Macauley and Healy silicic submarine caldera volcanoes in the Kermadec arc. The project aims at understanding the behaviour of submarine volcanism during silicic caldera-forming eruptions. This fantastic project will include analysis of pre-existing cores and new cores collected during the voyage. The student will be part of the research voyage (1 month at sea) and carry out research in collaboration with our international research team. This research will include core logging, stratigraphic correlations, analysis of volcanic textures, pumice density and vesicularity, and flume experiments.

Eligibility
  • Experience in volcanology and sedimentology
  • Experience in analysis of volcanic textures
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work as part of a research team and individually

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Expedition SO255 dredged the seafloor of the Kermadec intra-oceanic arc and back-arc at multiple locations over >130,000 km2, retrieving pumice and volcanic ash from the shallow seafloor. This project will address dispersal and sediment transport processes from submarine and subaerial silicic volcanism at the scale of an arc. The PhD student will conduct LA-ICP-MS chemical fingerprinting of the volcanic glass and crystals collected during SO255, and compare this data with existing geochemical databases. The style of transport (aerial, as floatsam, or fully underwater) will be inferred using the clast's physical characteristics and the extent of their dispersal. Floatsam dispersion by surface ocean currents will be calculated using oceanic models.

This project has large implications on regional sediment provenance, but also on geochemistry and petrology of submarine arc volcanism in general. This project is partly linked to the 2012 deep submarine eruption of Havre, and is likely to be merged with future volcanology projects in the Kermadec arc, including participation to a voyage in 2020.

The student would be part of the dynamic Submarine Volcanism Group at the University of Tasmania, and would benefit from a large panel of experts in CODES and Earth Sciences in general.

Eligibility

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Earth Sciences
  • Geoscience
  • Marine Geoscience
  • Geochemistry
  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Authorship in a published peer-reviewed research paper
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Interest/experience in laboratory/research voyage
  • Ability to work as part of a research team / individually / as appropriate to project
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Martin Jutzeler for further information.

No results were found

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is offered as part of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Plant Success in Nature and Agriculture. The aim of the project is to develop mathematical tools to understand the association between species’ genomes and their observable characteristics.

Goal 1: Detecting homology, aligning genetic networks (GNs), ancestral state reconstruction and associating GN features with traits of interest:
For closely related pairs of species we aim to construct maps from the vertex set of one GN into the vertex set of another. Given a set of GNs from different species, and a phylogenetic tree, we aim to construct homology maps between the networks. This would allow us to reconstruct ancestral GNs at the internal nodes of a phylogenetic tree. We could then associate the evolution of network features with information about traits in the species of interest.

Goal 2: Developing a stochastic model for the evolution of GNs:
Given a network where nodes represent genes and directed edges represent regulatory relationships, we aim to model the evolutionary processes that act on these networks. We assume that GNs are under purifying selection to maintain the ability to perform particular functions but duplication, loss and subfunctionalisation will be able to occur – i.e. it will be possible to have a range of different networks that maintain an identical set of functions.

Eligibility
  • An First class honours or Masters degree in the mathematical sciences
  • Experience with graph theory and/or stochastic modelling
  • The desire to work in a multidisciplinary environment and learn more about the underlying biology

Applicants from the following discipline is eligible to apply:

  • Mathematical sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Barbara Holland for further information.

Closing Date

14th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Matrix-analytic methods (MAMs) is an area of applied probability pioneered by Professor Marcel Neuts, who has transformed the theory with an idea that, rather than developing mathematical structures that have little use for practical applications, the focus should be on constructing models and methods of analysis that can be applied efficiently, using fast algorithms and computers. Since then, many useful models and algorithms, and numerous efficient methods for applications in a wide range of real-world problems  have been developed by researchers in this area.

In this project you will focus on novel stochastic models in order to capture more complex behaviours than it was possible before, and develop algorithms for efficient analysis of stochastic processes useful for practical applications. You will have an opportunity to engage in international collaborations with  prominent researchers in the area of matrix-analytic methods.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability
  • Knowledge and skills in coding

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly for further information.

Closing Date

14th September 2021*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

An urgent need to improve hospital patient flow is a major challenge facing the managers of the healthcare systems. Critically, clinical evidence confirms that delays in treatment in hospitals lead to poorer patient outcomes and higher inpatient mortality. Poor patient flow directly contributes to: Emergency Department (ED) crowding, bed access-block, increased length of stay (LoS) and delayed discharge, and all pose risks to patient safety.

In this project you will focus on developing mathematical models and algorithms for a practical application in daily decision making in a random environment. You will engage with a multi-disciplinary team (Mathematics, Computing, Medicine, Department of Health) whose aim is to develop a suite of innovative models and a novel prototype tool for optimising patient flow.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The project aims to use applied mathematics techniques to model the seismic signals generated by active glacier processes, with a focus on those processes caused by melt-water, and related to sub-glacier hydrology.  Ice-covered areas such as Greenland and West Antarctica have recently seen exceptional summer melting in line with global climate change predictions, hence, this is an opportunity to use mathematics and computational techniques to address a major, real-world challenge.  The understanding of seismic signals generated by glaciers offers a pragmatic way to progress knowledge in this area as many key processes are intermittent or hidden from view.

Research outcomes from the work include progressing the capability for the early detection of exceptional or accelerated change in major outlet glaciers using seismic signals, and recommendations for future instrument deployments in East Antarctica.  Opportunities may exist for fieldwork and data collection if this is of interest to the candidate.

The candidate will gain research experience at the intersection of computational physics, mathematics and environmental science, and gain a wealth of transferable skills that potentially connect to academic, government or industry career paths.

Eligibility
  • First Class Honours, or equivalent, with a focus on one or more of the following: Physics, Mathematics, Geophysics, Glaciology, and/or Computer Science
  • Strong interest in scientific computation including modelling, simulation and data handling
  • Strong interest in interdisciplinary research

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Physics, Mathematics, Geophysics, Glaciology, and/or Computer Science

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Anya Reading for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The project aims to use data-driven computational techniques, such as machine learning applied to seismic signals to detect and understand active glacier processes, with a focus on those processes caused by crevassing and basal sliding.  Major glaciers in locations such as Greenland and West Antarctica are currently undergoing fundamental changes, in line with global climate change predictions. The understanding of seismic signals generated by glaciers offers a pragmatic way to progress knowledge in this area as many key processes are intermittent or hidden from view.

Research outcomes from the work include progressing the capability for the early detection of exceptional or accelerated change in major outlet glaciers using seismic signals, and recommendations for future instrument deployments in East Antarctica.  Opportunities may exist for fieldwork and related data collection if this is of interest to the candidate.

The candidate will gain research experience at the intersection of computational geophysics, glaciology and global environmental science, and gain a wealth of transferable skills that potentially connect to academic, government or industry career paths.

Eligibility
  • First Class or equivalent Honours degree with strength areas in the following: Physics, Computer Science, Glaciology, Geophysics, Mathematics
  • Strong interest in scientific computation including semi-automated methods and machine learning
  • Strong interest in interdisciplinary research

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Physics, Appplied Mathematics, Geophysics, Computer Science, Glaciology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Anya Reading for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Funding

There is a living allowance scholarship of $28,597pa (2021 rate) for this project for 3.5 years with no extension, that will be considered for an outstanding applicant.

The Research Project

This PhD project sits within the national ARC-funded Industrial Transformation Research Hub for Sustainable Crop Protection  (http://www.crophub.com.au) which is taking on the global challenge of transforming crop protection technology by delivering non-GM, non-toxic RNAi based fungicides (BioClay™) for specific diseases of crops.

The project, based at the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, will involve lab., controlled environment and field experiments in commercial vineyards to investigate the efficacy and mechanisms of novel RNAi based fungicides for suppression of Botrytis cinerea and bunch rot disease in wine grapes. New knowledge will also inform further development of the BioClay™ platform in other systems.

The PhD candidate will be provided with opportunities for research networking and career development through connections with other universities in the Research Hub and in industry.

Eligibility
  • Applicants will need an Australian drivers' license, or be eligible to secure such a license within one month of commencing the candidature in Tasmania
  • Applicants must be willing to undertake travel requiring one or more nights away from home, including travel to other Australian states
  • International candidates may apply if they are already residing in Australia;  otherwise, a suitable plan to manage covid-related risks will be required
  • Applicants must be willing to work outdoors and operate equipment required for field experimentation

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Plant Pathology
  • Viticulture
  • Horticulture
  • Crop Protection
  • Plant Sciences
  • Mycology

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria
  • Applicants who can demonstrate excellent communication and interpersonal skills are preferred
  • Applicants who can demonstrate an ability to propagate plants, especially woody perennial plants, are preferred
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, A/Prof Katherine Evans for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

A single major gene controls Al tolerance in barley. It was located on chromosome 4H. Gene specific markers have been developed and tested in a large number of germplasms. In our preliminary screening of an F2 population, we have identified a few acid soil tolerant lines that did not show tolerance alleles. Further mapping will be conducted to identify the potential new QTL and tolerance mechanism, including physiological studies which will assist the search of candidate genes. Both the known gene (HvMATE) and the new QTL will be introgressed to a commercial variety to study the effectiveness of the genes and potential effect of the gene/QTL on grain yield and quality.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Agricultural Sciences

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Prof Meixue Zhou for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

With 1.5 million cows in the Australian dairy herd there are potentially 750,000 male dairy calves produced as a by-product of the dairy industry every year, in addition to 560,000 surplus female calves above that required to replace the cows that are leaving the herd. In Tasmania, 68,731 of these "Non-Replacement Dairy Calves" (NRDCs) are born each year. Australia is one of few countries in the world where the slaughter of NRDCs at a young age for low value veal is more profitable than growing them out for beef production. This practice represents a persisting welfare concern and a major threat to the social licence to operate of the Australian dairy industry.

The low monetary value of NRDCs may be failing to incentivise their rearing for the Australian beef market. Inseminating dairy cows with beef semen is one promising strategy to maximise the value of NRDC being produced, but could increase the incidence of calving difficulty in dairy females. Part 1 of this PhD project will assess decision-making processes of dairy farmers in terms of sire selection in cross-breeding dairy reproduction programs, and the impact of these decisions on dystocia or perinatal calf mortalities. The second part of this PhD project will explore (1) attitudes to current and alternative management options for NRDC and (2) barriers faced to the adoption of increased NRDC utilisation.

Eligibility
  • Applicants will need an Australian driver's license
  • The applicant will be based at the Cradle Coast Campus
  • Applicants with excellent communication and interpersonal skills are preferred

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Animal welfare or behaviour
  • Dairy production
  • Social science

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Megan Verdon for further information.

Closing Date

14th May 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Meat and Livestock Australia has commissioned the University of Tasmania to conduct a research project to understand potential mechanisms of vacuum-packed (VP), chilled lamb with a view to enabling development of a novel intervention for shelf-life extension.

Meat spoilage is a complex process caused by a variety of chemical, enzymatic and microbiological activity, resulting in undesirable sensory changes that demarcate end of shelf life. The main process that drives meat spoilage is microbial growth and metabolism, owing to meats high abundance of readily available nutrients. Through our previous MLA-funded projects, we identified a number of organisms within the spoilage community of VP lamb and investigated their spoilage potential. It was found that Clostridium spp. were amongst the organisms that had the highest spoilage potential. While these results significantly advance our understanding of microbial spoilage of VP lamb, it is still very important to understand how Clostridium spp. and other spoilage organisms cause spoilage. Such knowledge will aid development of a more target approach for Australian red meat industry to extend the shelf life of VP lamb.

This PhD study will focus on understanding of lamb metabolome, and how this changes as the spoilage microbial community is developed over the course of storage. A successful applicant will work closely with highly experienced researchers, one experienced post-doctoral fellow and industry partners.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Dr Chawalit Kocharunchitt for further information.

Featured Projects

Predicting mine waste environmental impacts before it’s too late

Laura Jackson is a postgraduate student in the ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub for Transforming the Mining Value Chain at CODES, University of Tasmania.

Laura is trying to find predictive methods for determining the potential impacts of mine waste on the environment.