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From here you can shape the world.

Research is an integral aspect of the College, and our research degrees equip graduates with the skills, knowledge, confidence and connections to kick start, or further, their careers.

The College of Sciences and Engineering offers a diverse range of research degrees in each of our disciplines, from hard science to creative design.

We recognise the importance of academic and non-academic careers, and work closely with industry to cross-skill our graduates with real-world experience.

Our research degrees may see you travelling to Antarctica, testing cutting-edge technology in local micro-breweries, or designing new naval ships or sustainable housing. Choose a research degree from the University of Tasmania’s College of Sciences and Engineering.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Looking for undergraduate options?
Visit the 'Find a Course' page to explore our study options

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

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Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Women are generally underrepresented in the STEM fields and in entrepreneurial ventures linked to high technology domains. This project will use the latest psychological and sociological research to propose a framework to facilitate that more girls and young women enter and remain in those STEM and entrepreneurial fields where they are significantly underrepresented. The framework will be designed to actively encourage creativity, inventiveness, and global awareness in harmony with the development of a socially responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial mindset. Strategies will be designed, tested and fine-tuned in diverse settings within the secondary and tertiary education sectors, and within the emerging Tasmanian STEM-based entrepreneurial ecosystem, respectively.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Mature tropical rock lobsters have unique markings on their carapace, particularly on and between their frontal horns. These markings develop during the juvenile growth stage with consistent key features preserved across moult cycles. As such, these biomarkers can be used as a type of natural QR code – a 2D unique identifier – that can be scanned to retrieve certain data from a central database. Potential uses include real-time in-tank tracking, long-term stock monitoring and management, and end-product traceability applications. In a research and commercial setting, these unique markings can be used to produce a database of current stock eliminating the need for physical tags that often become dislodged, particularly after moulting. The ability to store data at an individual animal level opens the potential for significant advances in husbandry practices through behaviour monitoring and in-depth analysis of treatment/batch/historical effects. In relation to market-ready animals, the ability to recognise, and therefore verify, the identity of individual lobsters is of significant commercial interest in regard to food provenance, product authenticity, and supply chain traceability.

This PhD project will focus on developing efficient computer vision image recognition and matching algorithms to identify animals as well as building the systems, both physical prototypes and information management systems, and for application in a commercial setting.

Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Alan Henderson.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Many spiny lobster species such as the tropical rock lobster, Panulirus ornatus, produce high intensity broadband acoustic pulses, or rasps, made by rubbing a basal antennal extension against a ridged plate located below the eyes.  Much of the literature to date has focused on the use of these rasps as a deterrent to predatory attacks, however some studies have also suggested the possibility of intraspecific communication, particularly within the sub 1 kHz range. The range of sounds produced, what these sounds communicate, and the resulting behavioural effect on nearby conspecifics remains to be understood. Additionally, in an aquaculture environment, acoustic measurements may be used to monitor and assess feeding activity and be utilised to optimise feeding strategies. The use of passive acoustic systems has been studied in finfish culture and other decapod species, however little has been reported regarding spiny lobster feeding.

This project aims to characterise the range of acoustic signals produced by tropical rock lobster in an aquaculture tank environment and to associate the acoustic signals with particular animal activities and behavioural traits. The project aims to discern the level of communication and behavioural effect on cohabiting conspecifics, as well as assess the viability of acoustic measurements as an effective indicator of feeding or other animal behaviour.

Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Alan Henderson.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Hobart based shipbuilder, INCAT, builds some of the world's largest and fastest high speed aluminium catamaran ferries. Critical to the success of INCAT's vessels has been their ability to operate at high speed in heavy seas, and INCAT's position as worldwide leaders in their market niche has been assisted over more than two decades by ongoing collaborative research with the University of Tasmania's School of Engineering. A long term goal is to optimise the ship structure, minimising weight without compromising integrity at critical locations. Past recent research in this area has sought to quantify the loads exerted during a slam (severe wave impact) event. Structural vibrations following a slam (known as "whipping") are known to significantly modify the internal forces as determined by a quasi static analysis, and their effect has been partially quantified through testing of a 2.5m hydroelastic model, full scale strain measurements, and dynamic finite element analysis. The current project aims to extend this work by relating the asymmetric slams and bending moments to the asymmetric design loads within the superstructure connecting the two hulls (referred to as "pitch connecting moment" and "split loads") whilst further quantifying the motions response in oblique sea directions. This has the capacity to influence international design codes and to provide a more rational framework for the determination of design loads in similar ships worldwide.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in shipping industry
  • Model testing experience in towing tanks or model test basins
  • Marine engineering or naval architecture academic background
  • Experience in use of Computational Fluid Mechanics and/or Finite Element Analysis

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Jason Lavroff.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus on obtaining an improved understanding of how best to design much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania. This research project will seek to:

  • Identify current ways in which Tasmanian middle-, high-, and senior secondary-school students may recognize possible existing educational pathways leading up to tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Characterize any existing conflicting messages (or misconceptions present) along those pathways that may discourage Tasmanian students from further exploring their potential interest in secondary or tertiary Engineering studies;
  • Jointly build with Tasmanian career counsellors, guardians and parents, principals, students, and teachers a suite of comprehensive, holistic, and inclusive perspectives on what future Engineering careers may entail;
  • Jointly design with Tasmanian Engineering academics and practitioners a suite of state-of-the-art field-tested tools so that they are better able to engage with their primary and secondary school counterparts;
  • Actively encourage multi-sector and multi-stakeholder collaborative involvement in the design, implementation, and evaluation of place-based mission-critical action-oriented strategies that lead to much clearer and more exciting Engineering education pathways in Tasmania; and
  • Embed the latest inclusion, diversity and equity research in the re-engineering of the education pathways that are the focus of this Ph.D. level work.
Eligibility
  • The applicant should have several publications indexed in the Web of Science (WoS)
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the WoS would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • WoS publications by the applicant as a first author will tend to attract extra merit points

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Bernardo Leon de la Barra.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This Ph.D. research will focus in obtaining an improved theoretical understanding of the time- and frequency-domain properties of fractional-order linear-time invariant single-input single-output control systems. Thus, the proposed research work will be conducted simultaneously in both the time- and frequency-domains and seek to more closely relate several fundamental concepts in each domain to others in the counterpart domain. In particular, this research project will seek to:

  1. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the time-domain features of their impulse and step responses;
  2. Establish new connections between the zero-pole patterns of fractional-order systems and the behaviour of the frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics of those systems;
  3. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their impulse and step responses;
  4. Develop new parameter identification methods for fractional-order systems from knowledge of their frequency-domain responses;
  5. Propose new fractional-order controller design methodologies for the closed-loop control of fractional-order plants that make use of the results obtained in parts a) to d).

Some of the fundamental time- and frequency-domain concepts which will be instrumental in progressing the proposed research include: extrema in the time-domain step responses, pole-zero patterns, and frequency response magnitude and phase characteristics.

Eligibility
  • The applicant should have a number of publications indexed in the Web of Science
  • Citations of these publications as recorded by the Web of Science would provide the applicant with additional merit points in this competitive process
  • Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply: Engineering, Mathematics and Science

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Bernardo Leon de la Barra.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

The State of Tasmania exhibits some of the lowest levels of educational attainment among Australia’s states and territories. This project will use the latest educational, psychological and sociological research to design practical research- and evidence-based strategies to enthuse Tasmanian children to fully engage during their schooling years. The strategies will collectively target and inclusively align the many stakeholders (parents, guardians, teachers, peers, career counsellors, etc.) that play a role in influencing children’s aspirations for a better and brighter future. The strategies will be designed, tested, evaluated, and fine-tuned in diverse formal and informal educational settings. The project will make use of trans-disciplinary and integrative learning approaches with a strong focus on bridging the gap between the STEM and STEAM domains.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Bernardo Leon de la Barra.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Wildlife roadkill is a world-wide issue being tackled by using a large array of mitigation methods that have variable efficacy. Tasmania has a significant roadkill issue, and several endemic species that are highly vulnerable to roadkill. One existing method of roadkill mitigation uses an electronic device that is triggered by a car's headlights at night, warning wildlife that a vehicle is nearby through flashing amber and blue lights and a high-pitched siren. These particular devices are manufactured in Austria and have been operating with apparent success in many European countries, reducing wildlife vehicle collisions with big game species such as deer and wild boar.

Between 2014 and 2016 a trial was conducted on the west coast of Tasmania to determine whether these European devices worked on Australian species, especially marsupials, many of which are threatened species. While the initial trial was set up simply to test the field efficacy of these devices, the success of the trial led to the results being published ("Roadkill mitigation: trialling virtual fence devices on the west coast of Tasmania", Australian Mammalogy, 2019, 41, 205–211). However, this trial was conducted at a single site with no replication, and a similar published study conducted on a highway close to Hobart for 3 months did not produce the same positive results ("A trial of a solar-powered, cooperative sensor/actuator, opto-acoustical, virtual road-fence to mitigate roadkill in Tasmania, Australia", Animals, 2019, 9 (10), 752).

The disparity in the results between the two studies has raised questions about the conditions under which these particular electronic devices work to optimal efficacy (e.g., road type, vehicle volume, vehicle speed, road undulation and curve, etc.), but also whether the specific light waves and sound waves used as the "alarm signal" are going to be more effective with some of our native species compared to others.

The broad focus of this PhD project is to determine whether there are ways that could make the existing devices more effective and species specific, thus reducing roadkill even more. The final aim will be to design, build and field-test a state-of-the-art (and hopefully low-cost) electronic device with wide-spread testing, at numerous sites in Tasmania, for a number of endemic species, and under a variety of scenarios (such as road type and vehicle speed, as mentioned above).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates.
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, such as a research Master's degree or a coursework Master's degree with a substantial research component awarded high marks, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants with a Science, Technology or Engineering background are eligible to apply.

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Bernardo Leon de la Barra.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

The propulsive performance of an underwater vehicle is degraded by non-ideal operating conditions, including environmental disturbances and hydrodynamic effects resulting from vehicle motion. Whereas typical propeller operation involves a steady-state rotation speed, the implementation of a closed-loop control scheme that dynamically acts based on measured conditions can help to overcome these effects and improve the overall propeller response.

The aim of the project will to be to investigate the ability of novel real-time algorithms to control the behaviour of the main propeller of a generic underwater vehicle, improving its performance with respect to factors that may include maneuvering behaviour, energy usage and drivetrain reliability.

The project will involve a combination of modelling, simulation, and experimental validation. Using a dynamic model of a real-world marine vehicle propeller, novel control algorithms will be developed and demonstrated using an appropriate underwater vehicle simulation model. Furthermore, the control algorithms will be validated through implementation in hardware as part of an experimental trial to be undertaken in the AMC Towing Tank. An appropriate embedded hardware platform will be chosen and used to implement the controllers, which will then be tested using an existing experimental model based on the BB2 underwater vehicle with a generic propeller.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following discipline is eligible to apply:

  • Engineering

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Brian Salmon.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31 December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Currently, there are numerous methods and techniques aimed at extending the service life or repair existing structural elements. Bolting or welding of steel plates, applying CFRP and external prestressed tendons are the most common among these techniques. Nevertheless, these techniques have limitations and disadvantages such as increasing the self-weight of the structure, introducing stress concentration, reducing the fatigue lie of the structure or high labour and materials cost. Among the recently developed repairing and upgrading methods is the so-called Local Post-Tensioning (LPT) which increases the stiffness and the load carrying capacity of the structural member through adding reinforcing steel bars to a segment of the beam.

This project will be investigating the use of innovative strengthening and upgrading techniques (or their combinations) in order to extend the service life and restore the load carrying capacity of various steel, concrete or composite structural elements. The candidate will be using nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, experiments, or both to validate theoretical findings.

Eligibility

Applicants from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Civil (Structural  Engineering)

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Assaad Taoum.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This project will focus on defining optimum protein quality by determining essential amino acid requirements for juvenile topical and slipper lobsters. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the importance of between meal changes in tissue amino acid supply, balance and fluxes into growth or metabolism.

The research will combine established and cutting-edge methods to understand amino acid metabolism at multiple levels and specifically related to how well amino acid requirements are being met or not met. Classic factorial modelling of amino acid requirements will establish the base experimental approach. Advanced respirometry, combining oxygen consumption with carbon dioxide and nitrogenous excretion, will determine changes in substrate utilization within 24-h cycles and incorporate between meal changes in amino acid supply to tissues.

Protein turnover will be measured because it underlies growth, is strongly influenced by dietary protein quality (amino acid balance) and has high energy costs. Stable isotope tracking to the level of specific amino acids will be developed and provide further detail on metabolic pathways and specific amino acid retention efficiencies (e.g. Barreto-Curiel et al 2019). Targeted transcriptomics will then be used to understand how gene regulation relates to differences in amino acid fluxes. The research will ultimately help explain mechanisms that underpin differences in whole-animal growth efficiency and provide a detailed basis for feed formulation.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This project will support marine conservation and small-scale fisheries management throughout the Indo-Pacific region by developing novel strategies to incorporate data on fish movements into management decision making. The project will form part of ongoing research projects at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania, providing exciting opportunities for the successful candidate to build an international network and impact real-world management decisions.

Eligibility
  • Demonstrated skills or strong interest in complex quantitative and spatial data analysis
  • Strong interest in marine science, conservation planning and fisheries management
  • Strong communication skills (oral and written) and a keen interest in scientific publications
  • Willingness to learn programming languages (Matlab and R)
  • Demonstrated capacity to work independently

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Nils Krueck.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Input from rivers and estuarine exchange on to the continental shelf plays an important role in altering physical, biogeochemical and ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. This input may influence stratification, nutrient flux, and local circulation patterns altering lower trophic levels and primary productivity. While previous studies have addressed general aspects of the structure and dynamics of river plumes, most of this work has focused on plumes formed by large and medium-size rivers. Little attention has been paid to small rivers plumes and estuarine exchange, largely because small plumes and estuarine exchange is highly dynamic and varies across short temporal (of order of hours) and spatial scales (1-10kms). This variability hinders precise measurements of plume structure and content even though small rivers influxes of fluvial water and suspended sediments is estimated at about 25% and 40%, respectively (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Milliman et al.,1999).

This project aims to advance our understanding of the role of small river plumes and estuarine exchange in driving the ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. Given the highly dynamic nature of small plumes, this work will employ a multidisciplinary approach encompassing satellite remote sensing, in situ sampling and hydrodynamic modelling to develop high-frequency, high-resolution products of physical and biological variables of plume structure and content.

Eligibility

Desirable Skills:

  • Remote sensing, MATLAB, hydrodynamic modelling

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Andy Fischer.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Biofouling is a challenge for the aquaculture industry in Tasmania; limiting production outcomes by potentially restricting water movement through infrastructure, providing a vector for pests and pathogens, and additional complexity for harvest operations. As aquaculture moves offshore, the nature and behaviour of biofouling communities in these environments is relatively unknown. To develop successful management strategies it is essential to better understand the risk posed by biofouling in these new situations, in particular the species present and timing of fouling.

This project will provide the critical baseline data with which to understand how environmental conditions and farm management influence the composition and ecology of biofouling communities associated with salmon aquaculture around Tasmania.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology or a related field of research
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language

Desirable Skills:

  • Knowledge of hard substrate or biofouling assemblages
  • Experience in working with aquaculture industry
  • Coxswains certificate, or ability to obtain one

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Camille White.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This project will develop a new Gravest Empirical Model climatology of physical and biogeochemical watermass properties and use it to examine long-term change in Antarctic Circumpolar Fronts, and small-scale variability in Southern Ocean watermasses.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong mathematical background
  • Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • High-level programming experience in Matlab, Python or equivalent
  • Good understanding of dynamical oceanography

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience working in a Unix environment
  • Experience working in a high performance computing environment
  • Ability to produce high quality graphics to illustrate results

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Nathan Bindoff.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

The floating ice shelves around Antarctica play a critical role in its contribution to sea level rise, by restraining the flow of ice from the continent towards the ocean. These ice shelves often consist of a conglomeration of different materials, including meteoric ice, refrozen seawater (marine ice), and recent compacted snowfall. The structure of an ice shelf, and the properties of these different materials, can substantially affect its strength and future stability.

This PhD will use a range of methods including laboratory studies of ice samples, airborne geophysics data, and satellite remote sensing, to characterize the material properties and internal structure of an East Antarctic ice shelf, and to determine their implications for ice shelf stability.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Bachelor of Science with Honours (first class or equivalent)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Good scientific communication skills

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience in using GIS and/or processing remote sensing data
  • Experience in working with geophysical data sets
  • An understanding of glaciology and ice dynamics

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Sue Cook.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) and in particular seaweed aquaculture has huge potential, with estimates suggesting this could be a $100M industry by 2025. This project seeks to support the development of a sustainable integrated aquaculture model and viable seaweed industry in Tasmania/ Australia by providing an understanding of the potential impacts of biofouling and how that might be affected by regional and temporal differences with a view to optimising site selection and husbandry practices.

Degree Type
  • Master of Research (MRes)
Eligibility

Essential skills:

  • First class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology, or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language

Desirable Skills:

  • Background in aquatic botany, environmental science or aquaculture

Please check the Master of Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Wouter Visch.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

The collapse of reef ecosystems represents one of the greatest threats for biodiversity and seafood production worldwide. Concerningly, the recovery potential of collapsed reefs is largely unknown due to a lack of understanding of feedback mechanisms which can act to lock reefs into a collapsed state. This project will address recovery potential of Australian reefs by quantifying mechanisms promoting persistence of degraded turf-dominated reef states, which are an ultimate manifestation of collapse for temperate to tropical reefs.

The project will involve extensive SCUBA fieldwork to survey and conduct experiments to understand the stability of collapsed turf-dominated communities on temperate and tropical reefs. An explicit aim will be to determine unifying drivers, or idiosyncratic responses, of turf persistence stability across biogeographical scales. Fieldwork will be complimented with laboratory experiments in select locations.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • High proficiency in scientific writing, data analysis
  • SCUBA certification + >30 hrs experience underwater

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience running field experiments
  • Scientific diving qualification
  • Vessel license
  • Peer-reviewed publications, especially first author publication

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Scott Ling.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This PhD will aim to quantify mineralisation of the exoskeleton of juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters as a function of endogenous (stored) and exogeneous (food and environment) mineral sources.

Mineral fluxes in crustacean around moulting signifies specific physiological adaptations particularly aiming at maintaining the acid-base homeostasis. It is a common knowledge that at the pre-moult stage, minerals are resorbed from the old cuticle and at post-moult stage, the new cuticle is mineralised.  Crustacea have some specific mechanisms to store resorbed minerals, particularly calcium from the old cuticle and which is made available to mineralise the new cuticle at post-moult. However, this endogenous source of mineral is not considered significant in marine crustacea due to it being readily available in the environment. Therefore, it is generally accepted that food and the environment are the main source for minerals in marine crustacea and the relative importance of these two sources are species dependent.

At present, the ability for juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters to store and reutilise resorbed minerals is unknown. Similarly, the relative contributions of minerals from food and the environment is as well unknown for these two species. A quantitative assessment of the three potential mineral sources (stored, food and environment) which makes up the exoskeleton is key to feed formulation. The PhD will employ a wide range of analytical tools to further understanding of the mechanism by which the acid-base balance in juvenile tropical and slipper lobsters is maintained

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Antarctic marine ecosystems provide ecosystem services that are important on a global scale, and there is a strong imperative to understand and predict the responses of these systems and services to current and future climate change. An implementation of the Atlantis end-to-end ecosystem model has been developed for the East Antarctic region, and is well suited to exploring scenarios to evaluate potential climate change impacts on ecosystem structure and function.

In this project, the successful candidate will work with modelling experts to complete the calibration of the East Antarctic Atlantis model, and to use the calibrated model to explore simple scenarios for ecosystem change. In the second part of the project, the candidate will update representations of sea ice and ice dependent species in the model, and consider more detailed scenarios for change in sea ice habitats.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First-class Honours or Masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming, and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience with C and R programming languages, ecosystem modelling, knowledge of Antarctic marine ecosystems and climate change

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Sophie Bestley.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

The oceans act as major sinks of atmospheric carbon. The biological pump is the ocean’s biologically driven carbon sequestration system. It has many pathways for sequestering carbon (e.g. gravitational pump and particle injection via midwater biota), however, understanding and linking these pathways is not easy and therefore has seldom been attempted. Often the models designed to quantify downward particulate carbon flux in the oceans lack information on key pathways and their parameterization may only focus on a limited number of these pathways. Development of a holistic model which links these ecological and biogeochemical pathways will provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of downward particulate carbon flux across the oceans. Such a model will enable researchers to track the oceans’ ongoing ability to sequester carbon in response to climate change.

This project will connect pathways for carbon sequestered by the biological pump in both subpolar and polar waters of the S. Ocean. By working closely with relevant experts who straddle midwater ecology and biogeochemistry, the successful student will bridge the gap between different areas of research to develop a truly ocean-wide downward particulate carbon flux model which importantly builds links between these two disciplines. The model will be used to establish a firm baseline on the magnitude of carbon sequestered by the biological pump which will enable us to detect future changes in the downward carbon flux due to climate change. By tracking carbon export will be able to see whether this flux is maintained, enhanced, or diminished in the subantarctic and polar S. Ocean in response to climate change.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong maths/statistical background
  • Strong analytical skills, especially with scientific analysis/programming software
  • Strong English written and oral communications
  • Demonstrated record of independent research (e.g. Honours, or Masters by Research)

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience in biological and ecosystem studies
  • Experience in biogeochemistry
  • Experience in Southern Ocean processes

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Philip Boyd.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

From temperate to tropical seas, the collapse of reef ecosystems represents one of the greatest threats for biodiversity and wild fisheries production worldwide. Concerningly, the recovery potential of collapsed reefs is poorly understood due to a lack of understanding of feedback mechanisms that can act to lock reefs into collapsed states. This project will address recovery potential for Australian reefs by quantifying rates of predation and herbivory on healthy to collapsed reefs.

The project will involve extensive SCUBA fieldwork to conduct standardised surveys and experimental assays to quantify rates of predation and herbivory for temperate and tropical reef communities. An explicit aim will be to identify the existence of unifying drivers of predation and herbivory, or idiosyncratic responses, across healthy to collapsed temperate and tropical reefs.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • High proficiency in scientific writing, data analysis
  • SCUBA certification + >30 hrs experience underwater

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience running field experiments
  • Scientific diving qualification
  • Vessel license
  • Peer-reviewed publications, especially first author publication

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Scott Ling.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Set within a broader integrated strategy, encompassing genetic control, this Ph.D. project will build on historic capture data, daily age structure and reproductive traits at field sites on the southern (Tamar Estuary, Tasmania) and northern (Edgbaston reserve, Queensland) extremities of Gambusia incursions in Australia. This to assess population and incursion dynamics (including the scale of incursions) at the study sites, and if feasible, to develop broad-scale predictive models across the latitudinal cline, incorporating environmental data (e.g., temperature, photoperiod, pH and turbidity).

The study is expected to provide valuable information for designing suppression measures and managing invasiveness of G. holbrooki populations at the sites and for making predictions across the latitudinal bounds.

Eligibility
  • Honours or equivalent degree in Biology with specialisation is Fisheries or Fish biology
  • Experience in ageing fish, assessment of population parameters, population dynamics and quantitative platforms such as R and Python are desirable
  • Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their entry level research degree (honours/masters), prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Jawahar Patil.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Like humans, microalgae and other plankton rely on bacteria – their unique microbiomes. Metabolically active microbiomes are essential for primary production in the ocean and contribute to development of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Imbalanced or depleted microbiomes can substantially alter the way they respond to environmental change, and lead to disease and/or death of the host plankton. Microbiomes differ substantially from the background seawater microbial community, but how microbiome bacteria are selectively recuited by the host cell, and the principles governing assembly of a consistent community structure, are largely unknown.

A PhD research opportunity is open for a talented graduate to join an ARC-funded project investigating plankton microbiomes. This project focuses on understanding microbiome recruitment and community assembly. The project combines microalgal physiology, synthetic microbiome models, and microbial community profiling using Next-Gen sequencing to track development phylogenetic and functional diversity of microbiomes, and how they contribute to marine biotoxin production.

The project will be supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch and Andrew Bridle and will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania in Launceston. The project also includes collaboration with researchers in Scotland (Scottish Association for Marine Science) and the USA (New York University).

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in microbiology and/or molecular biology are encouraged to apply
  • Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships

Desirable Skills:

  • Candidates with strong computing skills and experience of collecting and analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Christopher Bolch.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Multi decadal ice-core records of key atmospheric chemical and aerosol species provides us with an important opportunity to evaluate how well new-generation climate-chemistry models perform. Constraining these atmospheric species is an important step in improving the accuracy of the aerosol-cloud-radiation system within our climate models.

In this project, the candidate will use ice-core observations of several key atmospheric chemical and aerosol species, including hydroxyl, dust, organic carbon, black carbon and methane-sulfonic acid to evaluate and test the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) model with full chemistry.

The candidate will need good computing skills including knowing a programming language such as python and experience working in a UNIX environment and preferably have experience in using large climate data/climate models. Good written and oral skills and an Honours/Masters degree in Atmospheric Science or equivalent STEM field are also required.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Programming skills such as python
  • Unix environment/bash scripting experience
  • Good communication skills (written and oral)
  • Honours/Masters in Atmospheric Science or other STEM degree with the relevant knowledge (maths, physics, chemistry)

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience handling large data
  • Experience using climate model output (eg. netCDF file formats)
  • Experience running a climate model

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Delphine Lannuzel.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This project will describe the benthic fauna of shelf waters off southern Tasmania in the Tasman Fracture Marine Park, leading to development of indicators for monitoring of future change, improved understanding of system function, bioregional structuring and improved ability to manage the Park and adjacent shelf waters for biodiversity values.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Ability to acquire skills in species identification, collaborate with staff from IMAS, IMOS and Parks Australia, ability to undertake extended periods of desk-based annotation, and experience in programming in R

Desirable Skills:

  • Ability to further develop quantitative analysis skills, demonstrated ability to publish scientific literature

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Neville Barrett.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Blue Economy will see significant investment in offshore marine and maritime industries. This project seeks to develop the robust marine spatial planning (MSP) tools to ensure this offshore development is sustainable - providing jobs, food, economic growth at the same time as supporting the ecosystem processes essential for the planet.

Eligibility
  • First class honours or Masters equivalent research in science, mathematics or related discipline
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Experience in programming and quantitative ecology, and knowledge of marine ecosystems and MSP concepts and tools
  • Background in multicriteria analysis and/or marine resource management and policy frameworks
  • Specific experience in MSP development and implementation
  • Experience in applying spatial analysis and mapping approaches for management and decision support systems (e.g. Marxan/MarxanWithZones, Ecospace, Atlantis, EMDS, Mara, ArcMap and R Programming)

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Catriona MacLeod.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This Ph.D. will aim to identify potential disease-causing agents in onshore lobster culture systems. With the intensification of lobster culture there is the suggestion that many putative pathogens will emerge that are yet to be identified or their associated diseases observed and reported.

Biosecurity is an essential aspect of this emerging aquaculture industry and it is vital to ensure that cultured lobsters are healthy to ensure the sustainability of lobster aquaculture. The closed-nature of onshore RAS provides the ability to monitor and treat all inputs and outputs to the system.

This research will use portable real-time third generation nucleic acid sequencing to characterise the microbiota of the tropical rock lobster (TRL) rearing system to provide a baseline as to what microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic microbes) are associated with the culture of healthy lobsters. This will allow the detection and identification of known and unknown pathogens that may enter the system or opportunistically impact the culture environment. It is envisaged that detailed knowledge of the microbiota and the ability to archive this information for future interrogation will lay the foundations for and allow onshore RAS lobster aquaculture to set a new standard for aquaculture biosecurity.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Despite relatively few diseases having been reported in the culture of tropical rock lobster (TRL) one colloquially termed white leg disease (WLD) has emerged as a recurring and potentially devastating health problem often resulting in significant losses of larval TRL. Research at IMAS has identified the aetiological agent of WLD as Aquimarina sp. TRL1 while health strategies to mitigate the threat posed by WLD are yet to be developed.

Biosecurity is an essential aspect of this emerging aquaculture industry. To ensure the sustainability of lobster aquaculture the use of living organisms or natural substances that prevent or reduce damage caused by harmful organisms otherwise known as biological control or biocontrol is preferred to traditional antibiotic treatment and potentially hazardous chemicals. Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria and are one of the most promising biocontrol agents. Predatory bacteria such as Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs) are Gram-negative, obligate predators of other Gram-negative bacteria and like phages are potential biocontrol agents.  Research into biocontrol to treat and or prevent WLD will form the basis of a PhD project and focus on the use of bacteriophages, and predatory bacteria (BALOs) as a health management strategy to prevent WLD.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Graduates with a strong academic record (e.g. BSc Hons, MSc or equivalent qualifications demonstrated by publication record) in aquaculture, ecology, marine biology, molecular biology and zoology or similar

Desirable Skills:

  • Research experience or undergraduate training in aquaculture, physiology, nutrition, aquatic health and/or molecular biology (project specific)
  • Demonstrated experience in aquaculture growth or feeding experiments and laboratory analytical analysis
  • Keen interest in and desire for a career in aquaculture and/or marine ecology

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Quinn Fitzgibbon.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Do you know how important Antarctic sea ice is for the global climate? Neither do we (nor does anyone else!). But we do know that sea ice plays a key role in the global ocean's uptake of 90% of the heat trapped on the planet by anthropogenic emissions, so this is an important question. We are looking for a motivated, creative individual with strong quantitative skills to tackle that question, as part of a world-class team oceanographers and sea ice experts.

The successful applicant will use data from the state-of-science climate models that are used to inform IPCC reports, to investigate how Antarctic sea ice affects the circulation of the Southern Ocean, how well those processes are represented in the models, and the global implications of those processes in a warming climate. Over the course of the project, the student will communicate their research in top tier scientific journals, and at domestic and international conferences.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Bachelors degree (with Honours) or Masters degree in a Mathematical or Physical Science discipline
  • Strong mathematical skills
  • Demonstrated experience in individual research (e.g. Honours thesis, Masters dissertation)
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills in English

Desirable Skills:

  • Bachelors/Masters degree in oceanography, meteorology, or a related earth-science subject
  • Experience using a high-level scripting language for data analysis/visualisation (e.g. Python, MATLAB, NCL)
  • Experience in analysis or ocean, atmosphere or coupled model output

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Will Hobbs.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Temperate reef ecosystems in the inshore coastal zone are one of the most valuable and productive ecosystems globally. They are often dominated by macroalgae in the form of large, conspicuous kelp assemblages that underpin ecosystem function. However, they are also vulnerable, with loss of ecosystem function due to organic enrichment one of the key challenges. Along with increasing pressure from coastal industry and urbanisation, aquaculture of Atlantic salmon is currently in a phase of expansion in Tasmania. To aid in the management of our coastal zone, we need to better understand how reef systems will respond to potential changes to nutrients and sediments in the water column.

This PhD project will investigate resilience in macroalgae dominated reef systems with regard to pathways and processes of nutrient enrichment. The overall objective of this project is to determine ecosystem thresholds in relation to biologically meaningful change.

There is a top-up living allowance scholarship of $5,000pa for 3.5 years funded by SMRCA that will be considered for  an outstanding applicant. Please note you must be in receipt of scholarships at the RTP rate in order to be awarded a top-up scholarship.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • First-class honours or equivalent in biology, ecology or a related field of research
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language
  • Scientific diver qualification or the equivalent thereof
  • Experience in quantitative methods with knowledge of statistical software programs such as R and PRIMER

Desirable Skills:

  • First-author publication in international peer-reviewed journal
  • Knowledge of macroalgal communities in SE Australia
  • Experience in manipulative experiments in field and laboratory
  • Coxswains certificate, or ability to obtain one

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Camille White.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Antarctic Bottom Water plays an important role in global ocean circulation and climate and yet its formation is also highly sensitive to climate change. This project will contribute new knowledge on the sensitivity of Antarctic Bottom Water to climate change. You will help collect new sediments cores during a voyage to Cape Darnley, East Antarctica, in early 2022, and integrate sedimentological and geochemical proxy data to assess the history of Cape Darnley Bottom Water formation during the last glacial cycle.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Bachelor + Honours in a relevant scientific field, critical thinking, good oral, written and quantitative skills

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience with analytical chemistry
  • Field work or other team work experience
  • Past research experience in paleoceanography

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Taryn Noble.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Carbon sequestration is the long-term storage of carbon on land and in the ocean. In the ocean, the biological gravitational pump was thought to be solely responsible for the transport of carbon from the surface waters to depth. However, it is now recognised that other processes are involved including particle injection via midwater biota. An important, yet understudied, component of this is the mesopelagic migrant pump which can lead to substantial amounts of carbon being actively transported to mesopelagic depths through the vertical migration of micronekton. Micronekton are free-swimming, taxonomically diverse, pelagic animals around 2-20 cm in size and comprise of some of the most abundant animals in the oceans. Micronekton contribute to the transport of carbon by feeding in the shallows and egesting C rich faeces in the deep. However, little is known about exactly how much carbon they transport.

This project aims to investigate the role micronekton play in sequestering carbon in the Southern Ocean. By linking ecosystem studies and biogeochemistry the successful student will use data and samples collected during the AAPP 2020/2021 SOLACE voyage to quantify carbon export by micronekton in the Southern Ocean. These data will be used as input into a carbon flux model for the Southern Ocean. Critically, this work will better link Southern Ocean midwater ecology and biogeochemistry.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Strong biological and ecological background
  • Strong biogeochemistry background
  • Strong analytical skills, especially
  • Strong English written and oral communications

Desirable Skills:

  • Experience with microscopy
  • Experience with zooplankton/micronekton identification
  • Experience in ecosystem modelling
  • Experience in laboratory analysis

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Philip Boyd.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This project centres on Australia's existing offshore regulatory framework for oil and gas development. Its key focus is the extent to which this regulatory framework can be used as a basis for sustainable offshore development, with particular reference to renewable energy, in Australian waters.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • Knowledge of offshore energy and emerging offshore renewable energy programs and Blue Economy programs
  • Skills in qualitative research methods and tools, awareness of appropriate quantitative methods and tools

Desirable Skills:

  • Desirable skills :Experience in offshore energy policy and law
  • Blue Economy policy development

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Marcus Haward.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

Funding

A top-up scholarship of $10,000 per annum for 3 years will be awarded to the successful applicant.  Additional funds of up to $10,000 per annum for 3 years may be available for operational costs.

The Research Project

The Giant Crab Fishery (GCF) is looking for ways to improve stock management. A lack of quality stock assessment data has led to increasing uncertainty in the population of crabs. This project is pioneering a new method of collecting quality data for use in population models that can more accurately assess the state of the fishery. Using Visual Intelligence, a combination of visual processing and machine learning, images of Giant Crabs can be used to collect size, sex and unique ID of individuals.

The successful applicant will assist in the development of image capture process that will eventually be trialled within the GCF. They will also develop models using Visual Intelligence to retrieve crab data from the images. It is hoped this data gathering process will be rolled out in southeast Australian GCF and assist in the sustainable management of the industry.

Eligibility

Essential Skills:

  • A degree (MSc, honours) in fields related to information and communication technology

Desirable Skills:

  • Machine learning (highly desirable)
  • Data analytics (highly desirable)
  • Programming (familiar with at least one of the following programming languages: Python, C/C++, Java, .NET, MATLAB)
  • Computer Vision (optional)

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Scott Hadley.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Since 2006, the internationally recognised and nation leading thermal and hygrothermal research from the University of Tasmania, has provided technical guidance for Australian regulatory and policy development. This has included technical advice for the Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme (NatHERS), the Australian Building Codes Board, State Governments and Industry.
Some of the most critical considerations for zero-energy and net-zero carbon buildings include:

  1. Building envelope thermal performance
  2. Whole of building hygrothermal performance
  3. Construction material hygrothermal performance
  4. Whole of building life cycle assessment
  5. Whole of region GIS informed planning.

However, international research has identified that some overly focussed methods for a low carbon future, may actually be creating interior environments that promote the occurrence of short-term and life-long cardiovascular and respiratory human health conditions.

The research within the hygrothermal research team at UTAS focusses on this nexus between the need to move toward a more productive and zero carbon future combined with providing durable, long-lasting and healthy interior and exterior environments. Within this research field, prospective students will evaluate and use world leading tools to develop a deep technical understanding of building physics and provide new knowledge to inform ongoing guidance to Government and Industry.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates. Scholarship recipients must enrol on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must have established skill in programming and building physics as they relate to building thermal performance and building simulation
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Mark Dewsbury.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

No results were found

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Facial Emotion Recognition is the process of identifying human emotion, most typically from human facial expressions. AI-based facial emotion detection can be applied in a variety of fields such as Driver Fatigue Monitoring, Marketing, and Entertainment. Driver Fatigue Monitoring employs facial emotion detection to determine whether a driver is in a state of fatigue so as to appropriately intervene in the behaviour of the driver to avoid possible accidents. Advertisers and market researchers try to use consumer emotional engagement with digital content, such as videos and ads, to create the best ads and optimizing media spend.

The popularity of deep learning approaches in the domain of emotion recognition may be mainly attributed to its success in related AI applications such as Computer Vision. Well-known deep learning algorithms include different architectures of Deep Neural Network (DNN) such as Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), Long Short-term Memory (LSTM), and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). Deep Neural Networks have increasingly been employed to learn discriminative representations for automatic facial emotion recognition with some success, however, certain significant issues remain unresolved. Such issues include: Occlusion-robust and pose-invariant issues; Dataset bias and imbalanced distribution; Optimal DNN parameter set; Multimodal effect. In this project, you will develop new deep learning algorithms to overcome these and possibly other issues for faster, more reliable, and more accurate facial emotion detection.

Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Shuxiang Xu.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

As learner interaction in an online educational environment leaves a lot of digital traces behind, vast data sets of students’ online activities are available, which is known as Big data. Data and analytics in education, teaching and learning has attained great interest, resulting high-quality research into models, methods, technologies, and impact of analytics in education area. Big data and learning analytics with Artificial Intelligence (AI) is greatly extending the power of computers to revolutionise education sector. Educational data mining techniques discover meaningful patterns in these large datasets to create probabilistic and predictive models such as student success algorithms, understand and optimise learning and the environment. Learning analytics and AI are not panaceas for addressing all the issues and decisions faced by higher education but become part of the solution to enhance and transforms the way to support learning process.

The aim of the project is to investigate the deployment of AI techniques and analytical model/algorithm for improving learning analytics and for discovering the meaningful patterns in the large datasets of students to improve educational processes.

Eligibility
  • Experience with programming
  • Critical thinking

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Soonja Yeom.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Haptic technology is also widely used in education to enhance student's learning experiences with anatomy as it allows physical interaction with anatomical structures  (Kup-Sze, Hanqiu & Pheng-Ann 2003; Reid, Shapiro & Louw 2018; Yeom et al. 2013). It is evident that AR and haptic technologies encourage student learning of anatomy through exposure of the body visually by 3-D modelling, and physically with tactile feedback. There is a huge educational potential to apply AR and haptics in education of anatomy. However, it has not yet been widely researched or evaluated.

The purpose of the proposed research is to investigate the use of interactive 3D anatomical simulation, used in conjunction with haptic feedback, to determine if it improves students' learning. The research will compare the effectiveness of the combination of AR and Haptic technology to their use independently, as well as comparing it to existing learning methods, such as 2D images and interactive resources (CD/DVD).

The research will be undertaken into four stages:

  • Generation of interactive 3D anatomical models in a mobile device;
  • Applying haptic feedback when a user touches/interacts with the 3D models;
  • Integrating the simulation of AR with haptic feedback);
  • Comparison and Evaluation of effectiveness of AR/haptic education in anatomy against existing methods.
Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Soonja Yeom.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

1st December 2021*

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Knowledge graphs (KGs) are large networks of entities and their semantic relationships.  It has been widely applied in multiple areas, including information retrieval, situation awareness and recommender systems. A KG can be represented as a set of triples (h, t ,r) in which h (head) and t (tail) are entities (nodes), and r (relation) is  the relation (edge) between the two entities. KG embedding is to represent the entities and relations in a continuous vector space. This is a critical process to make KG semantic meaningful and machine understandable, and normally achieved by using machine learning methods. Negative sample generation is an important process for KG embedding. It provides sufficient training samples for the KG embedding, and fill the vector to a continuous space.

KG was first designed to formalize unstructured natural language data. With the development of KG techniques, researchers are now exploring the use of KG in other domains, especially IoT, Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) and Cybersecurity. However, traditional KG mining and KG embedding methods have been mainly focused on NLP data, and are not suitable for the latest applications. This project will investigate the limitations of existing KG embedding and mining methods, and design novel algorithms that can mine KG data more effectively and handle the dynamics from complex application domains.

  1. Yongqi Zhang, Quanming Yao, Yingxia Shao and Lei Chen, NSCaching: Simple and Efficient Negative Sampling for Knowledge Graph Embedding, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1812.06410.pdf
  2. Yantao  Jia, Yuanzhuo  Wang, Xiaolong  Jin, Hailun  Lin, Xueqi  Cheng , Knowledge Graph Embedding: A Locally and Temporally Adaptive Translation-Based Approach, ACM Transactions on the Web (TWEB), 2017
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer science
  • ICT
  • Mathematical sciences
  • Electrical engineering

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Quan Bai.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Given the important challenges associated with the processing of brain signals obtained from neuroimaging modalities, fuzzy sets, neural networks and evolutional systems have been proposed as a useful and effective framework for the modelling and understanding of brain activity patterns as well as to enable a direct communication pathway between the brain and external devices (brain computer/machine interfaces). However, most of the research so far has focused on lab-based applications in constrained scenarios, which cannot be extrapolated to realistic field contexts. Considering the decoding of brain activity, the computational Intelligence models, including fuzzy sets, neural networks, and evolutional computation, provide an excellent tool to overcome the challenge of learning from brain activity patterns that are very likely to be affected by non-stationary behaviours and high uncertainty. The application of computational Intelligence methods to learning and modeling​ has recently demonstrated its remarkable usefulness for coping with the effects of extremely noisy environments, as well as the variability and dynamicity of brain signals. Additionally, neurobiological studies have suggested that the behaviour of neural cells exhibits functional patterns that resemble the properties of intelligent computation to encode logical perception. This paves the way for developing new computational intelligence techniques based on intelligence abstractions that foster the capabilities for modeling and understanding brain function from a quantitative point of view.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Selection Criteria

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Foundational programming skills
  • Statistics

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Zehong Cao.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

1st October 2021*

*unless filler earlier

The Research Project

Trust is a term used in many fields, including computer science, and has many different meanings [1] [2]. In this project, trust is used to generate some expectation of success in a collaboration between two separate entities/agents. Most of trust models assume single and homogeneous trust relationship between agents [3}. However, most of these models cannot handle dynamic environments.

Contextual information plays important roles in trust evaluation. Especially as ground truth is not available in many complex environments, trust is closely related with contextual factors including social relationships among entities, spatial temporal information, features and types of services, etc. To overcome some limitations in existing trust mining approaches, in the research we will investigate how to utilize contextual information in trust mining and develop a robust mechanism which can allow more accurate and reasonable trust evaluations.

In this project, the student will propose a context-aware trust model, which can take contextual information into trust analysis. The proposed model will be applied in open dynamic environments, and to improve collaborations among agents with different capabilities and skills, i.e., heterogeneous. Simulation-based experiments will be conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed model.

References:

  1. Marsh, S.P., Formalising trust as a computational concept. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Stirling, Apr. 1994.
  2. Sabater, J. and C. Sierra, REGRET: reputation in gregarious societies, in Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Autonomous agents. 2001, ACM: Montreal, Quebec, Canada. p. 194-195.
  3. Tang, J., H. Gao, and H. Liu, mTrust: discerning multi-faceted trust in a connected world, in Proceedings of the fifth ACM international conference on Web search and data mining. 2012, ACM: Seattle, Washington, USA. p. 93-102.
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Computer Science
  • Information and Computing Technologies

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Quan Bai.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In this project, HDR students implement and develop of state-of-the-art machine learning and deep learning models, especially in deep reinforcement learning algorithms to easily train intelligent agents for various games. The research goal is to speed up the learning process of multiple agents and allow each agent receives higher rewards in a game scenario. These trained agents can be presented in the demo workshop and can be used for multiple purposes, including testing of game builds and controlling behaviour.

In this project, we used the OpenAI Gym and Unity platform, which have been developed for creating and interacting with simulation environments. Specifically, the Unity ML Agents Toolkit is an open-source Unity plugin that enables games and simulations to serve as environments for training intelligent agents. This project will use this toolkit to develop dynamic multi-agent interaction, and agents can be trained using reinforcement learning, imitation learning, neuro-evolution, or other machine learning methods through a simple-to-use Python API.

Additionally, this project is mutually beneficial for both students and AI researchers as it provides a central platform where advances in AI can be evaluated on rich environments and then made accessible to the industry and research developer communities.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidate from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply
Selection Criteria
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Zehong Cao.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31st December 2021*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Deep Learning recently lends itself extremely well to the research in computer vision domain where hierarchical structures of computational neurons can learn predictive features to effectively make predictive decisions. For example, in health care, deep learning is becoming also popular among medical imaging researchers who are looking for great tools to process a large number of images produced by scanners.

The impact of this to the society is potential and attract more and more attention from health care experts who have been looking for better methods to reduce the error rates in diagnosis. However, the most common deep learning models used for image processing are CNN-based which is a complex black-box consisting of millions of parameters that confused the experts of why the decisions are made. As a result, there is an increasing scepticism from those who do not want to use deep learning because of the lack of explainability.

In this research, the student will improve the transparency of deep neural networks to provide insights of the decision-making process. The topics of interest are (but not limited to):

  • Medical imaging (eye disease detection, knee pain prevention, etc.)
  • Visual reasoning, image captioning
Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Honours degree/Master degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Son Tran.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This PhD projects will survey the plant communities in Tasmania’s beautiful forests. The project will involve fieldwork in unmanaged reserves and old-growth forest, previously harvested forests and recent fire-impacted sites in a landscape ecology study. Timber harvesting and fire can have substantial impacts on native plant communities, especially for rainforest-associated species. The impacts are expected to vary between species and with disturbance type, intensity and frequency. This project will contribute to a large ARC Future Fellowship study investigating the complex trade-offs involved between biodiversity conservation and timber production. The responses to management of numerous species of plants will be linked with timber yield/revenue across contrasting management systems in a large landscape ecology study. The research aims to guide forest policy by determining the optimal mix of reserves and management to maximise plant conservation outcomes in landscapes available for timber production.

Fieldwork plans will be aligned to the larger project to survey biodiversity along a disturbance/age gradient. The candidate will contribute to other aspects of project conceptualization. There may be opportunities for global collaboration to compile/analyse datasets of forestry impacts on plants; the project will involve some advanced data handling and statistical skills.

This PhD project will help develop the candidate’s skills in critical thinking, project management, fieldwork, data management and analysis, writing and communication. It will prepare the student for future careers in research, or with government or non-government land management or conservation agencies.

Eligibility
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Proficiency with statistical analyses, e.g. in R. Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS) and background in multivariate community analyses would also be desirable
  • Fieldwork experience; fit, able, and willing to work in remote field areas, sometimes in difficult conditions and basic living arrangements
  • Current driving licence
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Zoology
  • Forest Sciences

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Sue Baker.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

With growing tourism, recreational and agricultural industries in Tasmania, there is a need to better understand the impacts of human activities on vulnerable and endemic wildlife populations and their behaviour. This project aims to examine geographic patterns of nature-based human activity and the resulting response of wildlife across a broad range of landscapes in Tasmania, including National Parks, peri-urban areas and other locations of intense human use.

The methods will involve:

  1. Measuring human activity and animal activity (e.g., population densities, home-range sizes, peak times of diurnal / nocturnal activity) using different data sources, such as camera traps, literature reviews, focal observations, and interviews with land-owners or managers.
  2. 2.Use these data to understand spatio-temporal patterns of human activity and its influence on animal activity in different land-use scenarios (e.g., reserved areas, logging sites, agricultural sites, areas exposed to high-visitation tourism).

Outcome:

This research will assist stakeholders such as land managers and tourism operators to develop strategies for reducing the negative impacts of human activities on wildlife, whilst still enjoying and benefiting from the intrinsic 'values' offered by nature and wilderness.

Eligibility
  • A student with a background in both ecology and eco-tourism would be favoured

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Barry Brook.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This PhD projects will survey the diverse ground-active beetle communities in Tasmania’s beautiful forests. The project will involve fieldwork in unmanaged reserves and old-growth forest, previously harvested forests and recent fire-impacted sites in a landscape ecology study. Beetles are known to be sensitive to habitat modification by timber harvesting and wildfire. Beetlespecies vary widely in dispersal ability, feeding guilds and habitat requirements. Thus different approaches to native and plantation forest management could have varying impacts on beetle communities. This project will contribute to a large ARC study investigating the complex trade-offs involved between biodiversity conservation and timber production. It will investigate the characteristics of species that are resilient to particular management practices vs. those that are detrimentally impacted. The responses of numerous beetle species will be linked with timber yield/revenue data across contrasting management systems in a large landscape ecology study. The research aims to determine the ideal mix of reserves and management to optimise invertebrate conservation outcomes.

Fieldwork plans will be aligned to the larger project to survey biodiversity along a disturbance/age gradient. The candidate will contribute to other aspects of project conceptualization. There may be opportunities for global collaboration to compile/analyse datasets of forestry impacts on invertebrates.

The candidate will develop skills in critical thinking, project management, fieldwork, data analysis, writing and communication. It will prepare the student for future careers in research, or with government or non-government land management or conservation agencies.

Eligibility
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Proficiency with statistical analyses, e.g. in R. Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS) and background in multivariate community analyses would also be desirable
  • Fieldwork experience; fit, able, and willing to work in remote field areas, sometimes in difficult conditions and basic living arrangements
  • Current driving licence
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Zoology
  • Forest Sciences

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Sue Baker.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This PhD projects will survey bird communities in Tasmania’s beautiful forests. The project will involve fieldwork in unmanaged reserves and old-growth forest, previously harvested forests and recent fire-impacted sites in a landscape ecology study. Birds are affected by land-use changes impacting structure and composition of forests and many species rely on old-growth trees for nesting habitat. Different approaches to plantation and native forest timber harvesting and availability of mature forest reserves could have varying impacts on bird communities. This project will contribute to a large ARC Future Fellowship study investigating the complex trade-offs involved between biodiversity conservation and timber production. Bird species responses will be linked with timber yield/revenue data across contrasting management systems in novel approach to quantifying optimal land-use allocation. The research aims to determine the ideal mix of reserves and management to optimise bird conservation outcomes.

Fieldwork plans will be aligned to the larger project to survey biodiversity along a disturbance/age gradient. There will be opportunity to contribute to other aspects of project conceptualization. There may be an opportunity for global collaboration to compile/analyse existing datasets of forestry impacts on birds; the project will involve some advanced data handling and statistical analysis.

This PhD project will help develop the candidate’s skills in critical thinking, project management, fieldwork, data management and analysis, writing and communication. It will prepare the student for future careers in research, or with government or non-government land management or conservation agencies.

Eligibility
  • Excellent written and verbal English and scientific communication skills
  • Proficiency with statistical analyses, e.g. in R. Spatial analysis skills (e.g. training in GIS) and background in multivariate community analyses would also be desirable
  • Fieldwork experience; fit, able, and willing to work in remote field areas, sometimes in difficult conditions and basic living arrangements
  • Current driving licence
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Biological Sciences
  • Environmental Studies
  • Zoology
  • Forest Sciences

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Sue Baker.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

There is an opportunity for one PhD student to work on an ARC Discovery Project aimed at addressing the low resolution of 3D printed microfluidic structures. 3D printing can create bespoke 3D structures within a fraction of time and cost compared to traditional fabrication. However, its scope in chemistry has been limited by the low resolution of the 3D printed components. Hence, this project will utilise a state-of-the-art 3D printer to develop high-resolution 3D printed microfluidic devices, which would enable the fabrication of high-performance micro total analysis systems (µTAS).

This PhD project is only open for applicants who can commence on-shore.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Material Science

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Vipul Gupta.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Novel separation technologies and materials will be developed to contribute to filling the methodological gap for the measurement and understanding of the behaviour of nanoplastics in the environment.

Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Fernando Maya Alejandro.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

There is an opportunity for one PhD student to work on an ARC Discovery Project aimed at addressing the chemical susceptibility and biotoxicity of 3D printed devices. 3D printing can create bespoke 3D structures within a fraction of time and cost compared to traditional fabrication. However, its scope in chemistry has been limited by the poor chemical robustness and biotoxicity of the 3D printed components. Hence, this project will develop a new approach to coat 3D printed parts with a solvent and biocompatible metal layer that will broaden the applications of these parts in chemistry and may facilitate the fabrication of new point-of-collection devices.

This PhD project is only open for applicants who can commence on-shore.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Surface Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Analytical Chemistry

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Vipul Gupta.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

This proposal aims to understand the chemical and physical properties governing the transport of ions into and within advanced extracting polymeric materials, known as polymer inclusion membranes, under the influence of an applied voltage. These embranes are dry-to-touch and represent a new and potentially powerful analytical platform for environmental, medical and industry sample preparation. By understanding the transport mechanism, new membranes will be developed, capable of purifying and concentrating diverse targets chemicals from liquid and solid samples. These processes can take place during sample transportation to a entralised laboratory thus simplifying and streamlining analysis upon arrival to decrease drastically its costs.

Eligibility

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Prof Michael Breadmore.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is focused on designing and engineering novel transition metal-based catalysts to establish unprecedented chemical reactions. The potential of these processes to establish new modes of small molecule activation and develop novel synthetic methodology will be explored. The results of this project may lead to the establishment of new strategies for the rapid and direct synthesis of important classes of organic molecules, including natural products and their derivatives.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Organic synthesis
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Alex Bissember.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

31 December 2022*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project involves the screening of endemic Tasmanian plants to discover new and valuable compounds that can be used to lead drug discovery. By employing a practical pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) method developed in-house, a range of plants will be extensively screened to determine their chemical profiles. The identification of plants containing significant quantities of organic molecules that can facilitate semi-synthesis and/ or feature chemotaxonomic value will also be pursued.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Synthetic organic chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Structural characterisation techniques including NMR, IR and MSA

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Alex Bissember.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found how to apply.

Submit an application for this project.

Closing Date

31st December 2022*

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

In the absence of a magnetic field, certain molecules can retain magnetisation; they exhibit a hysteresis (or a lagging) in the magnetisation below a certain temperature. The term Single Molecular Magnet (SMM) has been coined to describe such molecules. The origin of the magnetic hysteresis is not from long range magnetic ordering as seen in classical magnetic materials, rather is intrinsic to the molecular features of the molecules. The best lanthanide SMMs are usually based on monometallic complexes. However, radical bridges have been used to provide a very strong interaction between the unpaired electrons in the contracted 4f orbitals in dinuclear lanthanide complexes. This project involves the synthesis of new dinuclear complexes involving the verdazyl ligand.

Eligibility
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, Dr Rebecca Fuller.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

No results were found

No results were found

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

Matrix-analytic methods (MAMs) is an area of applied probability pioneered by Professor Marcel Neuts, who has transformed the theory with an idea that, rather than developing mathematical structures that have little use for practical applications, the focus should be on constructing models and methods of analysis that can be applied efficiently, using fast algorithms and computers. Since then, many useful models and algorithms, and numerous efficient methods for applications in a wide range of real-world problems  have been developed by researchers in this area.

In this project you will focus on novel stochastic models in order to capture more complex behaviours than it was possible before, and develop algorithms for efficient analysis of stochastic processes useful for practical applications. You will have an opportunity to engage in international collaborations with  prominent researchers in the area of matrix-analytic methods.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability
  • Knowledge and skills in coding

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

Closing Date

29th October 2021

The Research Project

An urgent need to improve hospital patient flow is a major challenge facing the managers of the healthcare systems. Critically, clinical evidence confirms that delays in treatment in hospitals lead to poorer patient outcomes and higher inpatient mortality. Poor patient flow directly contributes to: Emergency Department (ED) crowding, bed access-block, increased length of stay (LoS) and delayed discharge, and all pose risks to patient safety.

In this project you will focus on developing mathematical models and algorithms for a practical application in daily decision making in a random environment. You will engage with a multi-disciplinary team (Mathematics, Computing, Medicine, Department of Health) whose aim is to develop a suite of innovative models and a novel prototype tool for optimising patient flow.

Eligibility
  • Strong research and analytical skills in mathematics
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding

Please check the Higher Degree by Research minimum entry requirements.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the supervisor, A/Prof Malgorzata O'Reilly.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found here.

To submit an application for this project, click here.

No results were found

No results were found

Featured Projects

Predicting mine waste environmental impacts before it’s too late

Laura Jackson is a postgraduate student in the ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub for Transforming the Mining Value Chain at CODES, University of Tasmania.

Laura is trying to find predictive methods for determining the potential impacts of mine waste on the environment.