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FRIDAY SEMINAR SERIES | How housing policy is changing - and why

Summary

FRIDAY SEMINAR SERIES

Start Date

21 Jul 2017 1:00 pm

End Date

21 Jul 2017 2:00 pm

Venue

Room 333, Physics Building, University of Tasmania Sandy Bay campus

RSVP / Contact

No RSVP required. This is a free seminar and everyone is welcome to attend.
Enquiries to ISC.Admin@utas.edu.au


Institute for the Study of Social Change logo

An Institute for the Study of Social Change and School of Social Sciences seminar

presented by

Professor Mark Stephens, Director, Urban Institute
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh

Eminent UK housing researcher Professor Mark Stephens will explore the relationship between social housing and the wider welfare regime. He argues wider welfare regimes create the superstructure around which housing regimes can be created. He further argues the growth in mortgaged home-ownership since the 1980s has eroded the ability of social rental systems to define the rest of the housing system in countries including the Netherlands and Sweden, whilst in Germany direct regulatory interventions are increasingly required to maintain the integrity of the rental sector. Overall, changes in the wider welfare regime and the wider economic system are narrowing the choices open to housing policy makers.

Mark Stephens is Professor of Public Policy and Director of The Urban Institute at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. His principal research interest is the relationship between poverty and housing, and in particular, whether housing policy can act as a “corrective” to poverty and income inequality. He has led many influential studies including the EU Study on Housing Exclusion (European Commission). He is currently on the UK Housing Review team and a co-Investigator in the new ESRC Collaborative Housing Research Centre based in Glasgow.

Contact

Institute for Social Change
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 44
HOBART TAS 7001

E: ISC.Admin@utas.edu.au

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