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The Cat Catastrophe: Pet or pest?

Held on the 24th Jul 2024

at 6pm to
7:30pm

, Southern Tasmania; Online


Add to Calendar 2024-07-24 18:00:00 2024-07-24 19:30:00 Australia/Sydney The Cat Catastrophe: Pet or pest? Discover the surprising impact of cats on Tasmania's wildlife with our experts. Learn about their role, current management plans, and what it means to be a responsible cat owner. Online and the Sir Stanley Burbury Lecture Theatre, Dobson Road, Sandy Bay
Venue:

Online and the Sir Stanley Burbury Lecture Theatre, Dobson Road, Sandy Bay

Summary:

Discover the surprising impact of cats on Tasmania's wildlife with our experts. Learn about their role, current management plans, and what it means to be a responsible cat owner.


Our Island is full of cat lovers, with one in four Tasmanians owned by a feline friend. But either as cherished companions, or cunning predators, cats play a complex role in our environment.

A domestic cat kills an average of 186 animals per year, and feral cats have even more capacity for harm. The impact of these beloved animals is profound, particularly on Tasmania's small mammal populations, some of which are already on the brink of extinction.

Join the experts and discover more about the cat catastrophe. Find out about the impacts on Tasmania’s unique ecosystem, learn about current management plans and consider whether Tasmanians can be responsible cat owners.

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Pre-event refreshments
Head to the venue early and enjoy complimentary refreshments from 5.30pm.

Parking
Free parking is available at the venue.

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The experts

Alex Paton is an invasive species ecologist and PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania. Her research is focused on tracking Tasmania's infamous criminal: feral cats. These elusive carnivores wreak havoc in the wild, yet are challenging to locate. Using camera traps, she captures images of feral cats across Tasmania, aiming to enhance understanding of their distribution and population. Her work seeks to improve monitoring technology to better.

Dr Catherine Young recently led a project at NRM South to address the impacts of feral, stray and domestic cats on Bruny Island’s native wildlife. This project saw the removal of over 120 stray and feral cats from north Bruny, improved community engagement with cat owners and supported a series of trials to assess different feral cat removal methods. Catherine has worked across a range of environments in Australia, South Africa and the UK, and her research background includes extensive experience working with Tasmania’s threatened fauna, particularly birds.

Noel Huntis the CEO of Ten Lives Cat Centre, the largest dedicated cat shelter in Tasmania. Under Noel’s leadership, the not-for-profit organization has implemented innovative programs to support feline welfare across the state, such as the Richmond Project, which uses community engagement and camera surveys to manage and reduce stray and feral cat populations effectively, and Meow Meals, a feline food assistance program that supports pet owners facing financial hardship.

Dr Tiana Pirtleis an experienced ecologist and science communicator whose primary research focus is the management of invasive populations, such as feral deer and horses. She received her PhD in ecology from the University of Tasmania and now works at the Invasive Species Council, where she advocates for effective management of Tasmania’s most problematic invasive species, including feral deer and cats. She also champions science outreach and engagement as the Inspiring Tasmania manager at the University of Tasmania.