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  2. Thumbnail for Future wildfire warning for Australia

    Future wildfire warning for Australia

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2017/236-future-wildfire-warning-for-australia
    7 Feb 2017: University of Tasmania Professor of Environmental Change Biology David Bowman led an international collaboration - including researchers from the University of Idaho and South Dakota State University - to compile a global satellite database of the
  3. Thumbnail for Tails you lose for lizards

    Tails you lose for lizards

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2019/888-tails-you-lose-for-lizards
    21 Jul 2019: The natural ability of lizards to drop and then regrow their tails is a neat evolutionary trick that allows them to avoid predators and remain alive. But new research from the University of Tasmania - published recently in Biology Letters - reveals
  4. Thumbnail for Moreton Bay bug on the menu

    Moreton Bay bug on the menu

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2018/664-moreton-bay-bug-on-the-menu
    16 Jul 2018: The Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) researchers who developed a world-first method to breed rock lobsters commercially have now paved the way for a Moreton Bay bug aquaculture industry in Tasmania. Based at IMAS’s Taroona
  5. Thumbnail for Possums bounce back on Maria Island

    Possums bounce back on Maria Island

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2019/927-possums-bounce-back-on-maria-island
    23 Sep 2019: The recent introduction of healthy Tasmanian Devils to Maria Island was initially bad news for the local possum population, a species blissfully ignorant of the predator’s existence. But the ability of the prey species to rapidly modify its
  6. Thumbnail for Changing climate puts the heat on regeneration

    Changing climate puts the heat on regeneration

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2018/622-changing-climate-puts-the-heat-on-regeneration
    30 May 2018: Regeneration after bushfires could be compromised by climate change, research shows. Scientists from the University of Tasmania’s School of Natural Sciences looked at how certain chemicals, produced by bushfires and crucial to stimulating new
  7. Thumbnail for Designer rice could help beat diabetes, cancer, and obesity

    Designer rice could help beat diabetes, cancer, and obesity

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2016/172-designer-rice-could-help-beat-diabetes-cancer-and-obesity
    20 Oct 2016: Scientists have discovered a way to increase the production of resistant starch in rice, which could have beneficial health consequences for more than half of the world’s population. University of Tasmania School of Biological Sciences Professor
  8. Thumbnail for Kudos for cracking cubed poo code

    Kudos for cracking cubed poo code

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2019/923-kudos-for-cracking-cubed-poo-code
    16 Sep 2019: A cubed conundrum has for decades baffled bushwalkers and biological scientists alike. New research from the University of Tasmania’s Dr Scott Carver, Dr Ashley Edwards and Dr Alynn Martin – together with Georgia Tech’s Professor David Hu –
  9. Thumbnail for Seismic airguns' noise harming scallops

    Seismic airguns' noise harming scallops

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2017/415-seismic-airguns-noise-harming-scallops
    18 Sep 2017: Tests conducted by researchers from Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and Curtin University have found that noise from seismic airguns used for marine oil and gas exploration significantly increases mortality in scallops. Published
  10. Thumbnail for No simple trigger for soil ‘carbon bomb’

    No simple trigger for soil ‘carbon bomb’

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2018/558-no-simple-trigger-for-soil-carbon-bomb
    12 Mar 2018: A new international study has found the relationship between soil carbon and its impact on global warming is more complicated than first thought. Research lead author Professor Natasja van Gestel from Texas Tech University was joined by a team of
  11. Thumbnail for Here's what makes lizards bond with their babies

    Here's what makes lizards bond with their babies

    https://www.utas.edu.au/about/news-and-stories/articles/2017/501-heres-what-makes-lizards-bond-with-their-babies
    18 Dec 2017: Reptiles who give birth to live young are more likely to bond with their offspring, leading to family life, compared to reptiles who lay eggs, new research has found. Researchers from the University of Tasmania and Lund University (Sweden) studied

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