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University of Tasmania Law Review

About us

The University of Tasmania Law Review (UTLR) is a double-blind peer reviewed academic journal, published by the University of Tasmania. The Journal covers a wide range of content with a focus on international and comparative law, but including articles with an Australian or Tasmanian focus.

Since its first issue in 1958, the University of Tasmania Law Review has published a diverse range of law-related articles from Australia and around the world dealing with topics such as legal history, current legal issues and future directions of the law.

Managed and edited by a student editorial board, the Review is a refereed journal and all articles are assessed through a formal peer-review process. The Review is proud of its streamlined editorial process, which ensures articles are as current as possible while maintaining the best standards of content and presentation.

The following articles have appeared in recent issues:

  • 'Maritime Interception: A Snapshot of Australian Policy, Law & Practice, and the Opportunity for Change' by Susanna Dechent
  • 'Employer Deductions from Accounts Payable under the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth): Restrictions on being both the Payer and Payee' by Nadia Stojanova
  • 'The Raised Spectre of Silencing 'Political' and 'Environmental' Protest: Will the High Court Find the Workplaces (Protection from Protesters) Act 2014 (Tas) Impermissibly Infringes the Constitutionally Implied Freedom of Political Communication in Brown v The State of Tasmania?' by William Bartlett
  • 'Towards Cross-Cultural Fluency in Mediation Standards' by Kenny Yang

The journal also regularly features case notes and book reviews.

Past issues are available online on AustLII twelve months after publication.

Current Edition

38(2) 2019

TThis issue contains three peer reviewed articles:

  1. ‘Reforming Judicial Review in Tasmania’
    Matthew Groves examines the recently published Issues Paper and Final Report of the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute about reforming statutory judicial review. This article explains the reforms recommended and considers an additional two reforms not recommended by the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute.
  2. ‘Artificial Intelligence and the Legal Profession: Becoming the AI-Enhanced Lawyer’
    Michael Legg and Felicity Bell explore the changes that AI is likely to bring to the legal profession, highlighting the ways in which the rise of AI will make the work of lawyers more efficient, but also more valuable.
  3. ‘The Reasonable Management Action’ Exception in Workers’ Compensation Claims in Tasmania: An Analysis of Published Decisions’
    Authors Olivia Rundle, Megan Woods and Laura Michaelson examines use of the ‘reasonable management action’ exception in Tasmanian worker’ compensation cases related to psychological injury. Particularly, this article examines how multiple psychological injuries are weighed in case law and the assessment of ‘reasonableness.’

This issue also contains one case note:

  1. ‘Until Marriage Do Us Part – Revocation of Wills by Marriage: Re Estate Grant, Deceased
    Brendon Banks looks at the reasoning of the Justice Lindsay in the succession case of Re Estate Grant. Particularly, this case note examines the effect of a finding that a will has been made ‘in contemplation of marriage.’

This issue also features three book reviews, covering the following titles:

  1. Rape Law in Context: Contesting the Scales of Injustice
  2. Equity: Conscience Goes to Market
  3. The Constitution of the Environmental Emergency

Previous Edition

38(1) 2019

This issue celebrates the 125th anniversary of the University of Tasmania Law School and includes an introduction by Professor Timothy McCormack, Dean of the Faculty of Law.

This issue contains four peer reviewed articles:

  1. ‘Justice Kennedy’s Legacy of Constitutional Comparativism: An Australian Perspective’
  2. ‘The Future of the Fettering Rule in Judicial Review’
  3. ‘The Westminster Model in Comparative Administrative Law: Incentives for Controls on Regulation-Making’
  4. ‘In Search of a Model Provision for Rape in Australia’

Case notes:

  1. ‘Ways of Making You Talk: Germany’s Judicial Determinations that the Executive Must Answer Parliamentary Questions Properly’ by Greg Taylor
  2. ‘Lazarus in Tasmania: Comparing the Responsibility to Communicate and Ascertain Consent under New South Wales and Tasmanian Law’ by Taylor Bachand
  1. ‘Reforming Judicial Review in Tasmania’
    Matthew Groves examines the recently published Issues Paper and Final Report of the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute about reforming statutory judicial review. This article explains the reforms recommended and considers an additional two reforms not recommended by the Tasmanian Law Reform Institute.
  2. ‘Artificial Intelligence and the Legal Profession: Becoming the AI-Enhanced Lawyer’
    Michael Legg and Felicity Bell explore the changes that AI is likely to bring to the legal profession, highlighting the ways in which the rise of AI will make the work of lawyers more efficient, but also more valuable.
  3. ‘The Reasonable Management Action’ Exception in Workers’ Compensation Claims in Tasmania: An Analysis of Published Decisions’
    Authors Olivia Rundle, Megan Woods and Laura Michaelson examines use of the ‘reasonable management action’ exception in Tasmanian worker’ compensation cases related to psychological injury. Particularly, this article examines how multiple psychological injuries are weighed in case law and the assessment of ‘reasonableness.’

This issue also contains one case note:

  1. ‘Until Marriage Do Us Part – Revocation of Wills by Marriage: Re Estate Grant, Deceased
    Brendon Banks looks at the reasoning of the Justice Lindsay in the succession case of Re Estate Grant. Particularly, this case note examines the effect of a finding that a will has been made ‘in contemplation of marriage.’

This issue also features three book reviews, covering the following titles:

  1. Rape Law in Context: Contesting the Scales of Injustice
  2. Equity: Conscience Goes to Market
  3. The Constitution of the Environmental Emergency

Contributions to the Journal

We welcome the submission of articles, preferably between 4,000 and 10,000 words (inclusive of footnotes) and on topics of relevance to academics and the legal community. It is required that all articles be accompanied by an abstract of approximately 200 words in length. Contributors should note that the University of Tasmania Law Review has a particular focus on Australian, Asia-Pacific and international legal issues. Articles should contain useful headings. References must be footnoted in accordance with the Australian Guide to Legal Citation (4th ed, 2018).

All articles considered to be of the appropriate format and subject matter are refereed using a double-blind process. This process of refereeing takes approximately two months. Authors will be notified of the Editors' decision regarding publication and will be kept informed throughout the process. If an article contains subject matter that is of a time-sensitive nature, then the Editors may consider early publication of an article on the website. This involves fast-tracking the double-blind process.

Manuscripts must be submitted online at Law Review Article Submission Form. All manuscripts must be in a format able to be edited (no PDF or read-only files). If there is more than one author for your manuscript, the lead author or author who will handle the correspondence with the Review should complete the online form. Please note in the ‘comments’ box if there are multiple authors. All co-authors must complete the Law Review Article - Co-author Submission Form before the manuscript will be considered.

Authors are encouraged to submit articles now for volume 40. The first issue of volume 40 will be printed in Winter 2021.

Download the Submission and Publication Agreement University of Tasmania Law Review (PDF 25KB).

For any questions regarding submissions or any other matters please contact us by email at Law.Review@utas.edu.au

Information for Subscribers

The journal is published twice a year. The cost of the Journal is:

  • $55.00 per issue for domestic subscribers, and
  • $60.00 (AUD) for overseas subscribers (delivered economy airmail).

The prices are both inclusive of postage and handling and GST where applicable. Subscriptions can be organised by contacting the Law School Publications Officer below.

Notify me when a new issue is published


Intending subscribers should contact:

Publications Officer
Faculty of Law
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 89
Tasmania, Australia 7001.
Fax: (03) 6226 7623
Phone: (03) 6226 7552
Email: Law.Publications@utas.edu.au

One Off-Copies

Readers can also purchase a one-off copy of a particular issue.
You may either send a cheque with your subscription notice, or we will invoice you when you receive your first issue.

Subscriptions within North or South America should be addressed to:

William S. Hein & Co., Inc.
2350 North Forest Road | Getzville, NY 14068

www.wshein.com/contact-us

Editorial Board

Faculty Advisor: 

  • Dr Peter Lawrence

Editors: 

  • Elizabeth Reed
  • Naomi Hauser

Editorial Board Members: 

  • Courtney Bailey
  • Nicholas Bartlett
  • Harrison Fawcett
  • Sylvia Lawrence
  • Isabella Memed
  • Tanja Mutton
  • Aisha Nazzal
  • Chun Yu