Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science (P3L)

Overview  2021

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

mode.loadCategory not equal to Part Time
Minimum 3 Years, up to a maximum of 7 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2

Commonwealth Supported places available

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 3 Years
Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2

"I would 100% recommend studying at IMAS. It provides an excellent basis for making connections within the scientific community, the facilities are amazing, and the research and volunteer opportunities are unmatched!”

Kat Stuart
Marine and Antarctic Science student
Due to the ongoing response to COVID-19, online study may replace some or all of your on-campus classes. We'll be sure to keep you informed of any changes.
Our Marine and Antarctic Science degree is the only one of its kind in Australia and is offered at one of the best places in the world for temperate marine studies. It gives you the skills and knowledge for a career in the exciting, growing and globally critical marine, fisheries, aquaculture, and Antarctic sectors.

If you enjoy the natural and physical sciences, you can combine your passion for science with a love of the outdoors and adventure. This could be by pursuing a career in research, or in a more applied way through the sustainable aquaculture industry. For those interested in politics and policy, the world needs experts who understand the complexities of our marine environments to help set marine and Antarctic governance, working with countries, governments and private business all over the world towards common, sustainable goals.

The survival of humanity is linked to the health of coasts and oceans. It’s no understatement to say that those who study and work in this sector are directly contributing to the future of humanity, and the survival of our natural world.

For all our study options, you can be working with countries, governments and private business all over the world to realise common, sustainable development outcomes. No matter your passion, you will learn at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), our world-class centre of excellence for marine and Antarctic research and education.

In this degree you can choose your specialty: follow a research-oriented path at our Hobart campus, or focus on the more applied sciences and aquaculture in Launceston. We have five majors that cross the spectrum of these disciplines, which means that there really are options for everyone.

Choose from one of the following majors:

  1. Marine and Antarctic Governance (Hobart)
  2. Marine Biology (Hobart)
  3. Marine Resource Management (Launceston)
  4. Oceanography (Hobart)
  5. Sustainable Aquaculture (Launceston)

All our study options provide specialised skills and an educational experience centred on ecological sustainability. Overall, this degree prepares students for meaningful scientific careers in industry, or as researchers. The skills gained can lead toward contributing to world issues such as food security, climate change, and marine stewardship.

You will gain skills in data collection, analysis and presentation to interpret marine processes and patterns. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems, communicate outcomes to a range of audiences, and explain the role of marine and Antarctic science in society.

We are pleased to offer industry-leading facilities at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and the chance to study alongside internationally recognised experts. You will also have the chance to undertake study at any of our partner institutions across the globe, and work with a broad range of world-leading scientific organisations that have chosen to base themselves in Tasmania.

Many graduates continue into postgraduate study and conduct research in IMAS' key research areas of oceanography and cryosphere, fisheries and aquaculture, ecology and biodiversity, climate change, oceans and Antarctic governance and ocean-earth systems.

Course‐level Learning Outcomes at years 1–3 and in year 4 are based upon the national Threshold Learning Outcomes in Science, which have been modified for the BMarAntSc, have been externally mapped to the AQF descriptors.

Years 1-3: AQF Bachelor Degree – Level 7

On completion of the Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science, graduates will be able to:

  1. Solve problems in marine and/or Antarctic disciplines through applying the methods of science.
  2. Evaluate complex issues in marine and/or Antarctic science through applying appropriate interdisciplinary approaches, reflective practise and critical thinking.
  3. Evaluate and synthesise published information from a range of sources, including practitioners, to identify key issues in marine and/or Antarctic Science.
  4. Plan a focussed research investigation utilising appropriate practical and/or theoretical techniques relevant to the discipline.
  5. Collect, record and analyse quantitative and/or qualitative data to solve discipline-specific problems.
  6. Demonstrate effective communication of marine and Antarctic science concepts, results and/or commercially relevant information - in written and oral forms.
  7. Translate diverse forms of knowledge to provide relevant information for stakeholders engaged in policy and/or management of the marine and/or Antarctic environment.
  8. Demonstrate independent, ethical, legal, responsible and safe work practises that are appropriate for working in the discipline.

Your university learning experience goes well beyond lectures, labs and tutorials with study opportunities that take your learning into Tasmania’s thriving aquaculture industry, and nature’s classroom right on our doorstep: the Southern Ocean.

Group work, projects and field trips provide extra challenges, and you have significant opportunities to engage with industry, and work alongside world-class researchers.

Your learning experiences also benefit from our strong relationships and proximity to international experts and industry-leading facilities including the Australian Antarctic Division, CSIRO, and CCAMLR. You will have the opportunity to pursue work experience and research projects with these organisations, including field trips to coastal sites around Tasmania.

Immerse yourself in our living laboratory

Tasmania has six diverse ecosystems all within 30 minutes of the Hobart IMAS campus. We’re the gateway to Antarctica and, as the birthplace of Australia's green movement, celebrate our biodiversity and environmental sustainability in everything we do. Your proximity to a wide range of pristine, diverse environments, and the researchers who travel from around the world to work in them, give you unparalleled practical field experience while you study, plus it makes Tasmania an amazing place to live.

Become a Student Ambassador

Improve your communication, teamwork and leadership skills, meet new people, inspire and help others, and developing lasting friendships and networks as a student ambassador. Our ambassadors proudly represent the University throughout Tasmania in schools, at University and community events, and support a range of recruitment and engagement activities. Though the Student Ambassador Program or STEM Outreach Team you will have many opportunities for training and professional development, experience in real-world community engagement and outreach, networking, and public speaking, plus end up with a key point of distinction on your CV.

Study overseas at one of our partner institutions

Our international exchange program offers opportunities to study at universities around the world, and it counts towards your degree. Exchange can allow you to have an affordable educational and cultural experience in a foreign country for a semester, or a full year. To facilitate this, we offer a range of scholarships and financial assistance. You may also be eligible for OS-HELP Loans or scholarship funding to assist with their airfares, accommodation and other expenses.

Find out more about Student Exchange.

Tasmania has thriving aquaculture and marine research sectors for you to engage with and learn from while you study, with work placement and experience opportunities are available for all study options.

We offer opportunities for placements and research projects within businesses, non-government organisations, and research centres. Our deep connections across these vast industries connect you with best-practice businesses that are exporting to the world, globally connected policy setters, and research centres undertaking world-leading study. This provides both direct, first-hand educational experiences as well as the opportunity to build valuable networks to build towards your future career.

If you choose the Sustainable Aquaculture specialisation you will engage directly with industry through a work placement unit. This unit is designed to develop aquaculture, fisheries, coastal management and marine conservation skills, and gain appreciation of the work environment.

Career outcomes

"My University of Tasmania qualification was essential for gaining my career as a Feed Trials Technician at Huon Aquaculture.

This degree required several weeks of work placement which resulted in gaining employment in my current role shortly after graduation."

Andy Hilliard
Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science graduate

Studying Marine and Antarctic Science opens you up to a range of exciting career options across a whole range of marine-oriented sectors. Marine biologists research, dive and explore, while oceanographers utilise maths, physics and big data to track sea-level rise, and understand the ocean’s role in climate change.

Research careers

This degree provides a clear pathway for students to undertake postgraduate and PhD study and can lead to employment with local industry connections. The Australian Antarctic Program Partnership between the University of Tasmania, CSIRO, the Bureau of Meteorology and the Australian Antarctic Division employs PhD students, early-career researchers and technicians working with senior scientists.

With the highest concentration of marine and Antarctic scientists in the southern hemisphere, Tasmania is an ideal location to launch your career.

Applied science careers

Marine resource managers help guide the use of ever-strained oceans and ecosystems, while the sustainable aquaculture industry is exporting both product and best-practice to help sustainably feed the world. Through applied applications, your passion for marine and Antarctic studies can drive local changes for global benefits.

Postgraduate study

If you successfully complete this course, you may be also be eligible to apply for a range of other postgraduate courses including Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas and Masters by coursework and research. Filter the course list by Postgraduate to view the current courses available.

Professional Recognition

Graduates with Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science can apply to become a Professional Member of the Australian Marine Sciences Association (AMSA).

Course structure

The Bachelor of Marine and Antarctic Science requires the completion of 300 credit points comprising:

  • 100 credit point Major
  • 100 credit points of Core units
  • 100 credit points of Elective units

For your Major, you may select from Marine and Antarctic Governance (Hobart), Marine Biology (Hobart), Marine Resource Management (Launceston), Oceanography (Hobart) and Sustainable Aquaculture (Launceston).  The Core units are compulsory for all students.

In your Elective component you can choose from any units marked as "Student Electives" which you meet the pre-requisites for, at any level, from across the university. To search for possible Elective units, use the Unit Search tool to search by the discipline that you are interested in.

Your electives can be used to add breadth to your degree, by exploring a variety of different subject areas from within or outside the College of Sciences and Engineering. Alternatively, you can deepen your engagement with specific subject areas, for example, by completing additional units in the same discipline as your major or related fields.

You can also use this space to complete an optional second major which may be a second major chosen from another course noting some exclusions apply. Not all majors can be taken by students in different courses.

We have a team of Course Information Officers available to help you structure your studies to meet your desired outcomes.  For enrolment assistance please contact us via U Connect today.

Solving complex geopolitical environmental issues requires an understanding of the science at the core of issues and communicating this information to government in a compelling way to inform policy. Take a multidisciplinary approach to learning with topics available ranging from Marine Ecology to International Relations.

Introductory Units

We live in an uncertain and challenging era where global issues increasingly affect our local daily lives. Forty years of uneven globalisation has been accompanied by the rise of corporations, regional and international institutions, and international nongovernmental agencies. As important…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Intermediate Units

This unit presents the fundamental building blocks of marine resource economics and the key objectives and components of major economic theories of marine resource management. Students will gain knowledge in basic resource economic theory as well knowledge of the economic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Since 1991 when the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties adopted their Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, all activity in Antarctica has been viewed through the prism of its potential impact on the environment. International treaties protect Antarctica by…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Advanced Units

This unit looks at the diverse forms of international, global and transnational cooperation and asks critically how they have developed over time and space. It examines the structures of power and equality/inequality in international relations and how these are reflected…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The public policy arena presents a complex framework of actors, politics, instruments, and practices. This unit examines the broad range of theories, models, influences, and players that shape the development of Australian public policy. It aims to equip students with…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit, which is offered across a range of disciplines, investigates current issues in international marine management. It incorporates six distinct yet interrelated themes: resource exploitation (living and non-living); tourism and recreation; shipping, piracy and security; environment and conservation; marine…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

   
Choose 1 unit from

This unit takes an environmental justice perspective in introducing students to the dynamics that shape contemporary environmental policy (including green politics) with broad appeal to students of politics and policy, justice studies, environmental studies and science. The roles of politics…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels.Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System; [ii]…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In the Marine Biology major students will learn about the plants and animals of temperate marine, southern ocean and Antarctic ecosystems ranging from microscopic plankton to large animals. Graduates will develop broad skills and knowledge in marine biology that can be applied globally. 

Available:  On campus Hobart


Introductory Units

Provides an introduction to the scientific study of animals. Students are introduced to animal diversity through studying the major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with an emphasis on Australian examples. We consider the structural and functional characteristics of each group from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

A series of lectures and associated practical classes introduces fundamental concepts in ecology of both plants and animals. It also introduces behavioural and evolutionary ecology and experimental methods. There is a strong emphasis placed on developing skills in practical ecology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Intermediate Units

This core unit provides a broad training in fundamental aspects of population and community ecology and (with other core units in the School of Biological Sciences) forms an essential basis for specialist studies at third year level. This unit focuses…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This core unit provides a broad training in fundamental aspects of zoology, and with KZA211 (the other core unit), forms an essential basis for specialist studies in Zoology at level 3. This unit focuses on developing students' understanding of functional…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Advanced Units

In Marine Ecology you will learn about the fundamental features and processes of marine systems. The following themes are developed: influences of physical variables at a range of scales on communities and productivity; ecology of plankton; dynamics of estuaries; structuring…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Quantitative skills are among the fundamental tools of professional ecologists and other biologists. They are necessary to design their studies, analyse and interpret their data, and to assess and interpret published studies. This unit provides a solid grounding in appropriate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

   
Choose 2 units from

Provides a comprehensive understanding of the Antarctic marine ecosystem. The unit covers several key areas, such as the basic oceanographic features of the region and how these influence the distribution and abundance of nutrients, the role of microorganisms in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a comprehensive account of the biology of birds and mammals that inhabit the Southern Ocean (loosely defined here as waters from Southern Australia to Antarctica), and the role that they play in the marine ecosystem. Topics covered…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (late)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides instruction in the biodiversity and phylogeny of algal groups and allied protists, physico-chemical limnology and oceanography, phytoplankton ecology, micropaleontology, seaweeds, harmful algal blooms and aquatic food webs. Particular reference is made to studies in Australian, Antarctic and Southern Ocean…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

With a booming world population, the stress on an already strained environment and its natural resources is being felt particularly strongly in the Southern Oceans. This major gives you the qualifications to create a career in this globally significant field as you work towards meeting challenges now and in the future.

Introductory Units

Provides an introduction to the scientific study of animals. Students are introduced to animal diversity through studying the major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with an emphasis on Australian examples. We consider the structural and functional characteristics of each group from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sustainable marine food production introduces students to core principles, industry practices and current technologies that underpin site selection, production and harvest of major seafood species. The unit explores biology and behaviour and their importance in the development of production technologies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Intermediate Units

This unit presents the fundamental building blocks of marine resource economics and the key objectives and components of major economic theories of marine resource management. Students will gain knowledge in basic resource economic theory as well knowledge of the economic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit outlines quality control systems and the sensory and non-sensory evaluation of seafood. Topics will include key attributes of a quality control system, system requirements, product attributes and measurement. Students will learn to apply a range of nonsensory and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Advanced Units

This advanced unit provides students with a detailed understanding of the quantitative techniques employed in the assessment of fished stocks. The unit covers fishery dependent and fishery independent data and its use in predictive modelling, mortality estimation, biomass and yield…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with the principles and practices necessary for the planning and management of marine protected areas (MPAs). The unit syllabus addresses the types and roles of MPAs, planning and administration, processes for establishing an MPA and management…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with a detailed understanding of fisheries biology and population dynamics. Biological concepts include how morphology, behaviour, habitat preferences and life history strategies affect the exploitation of fisheries taxa. The unit also covers the logistical and quantitative…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The study of ocean currents, changing ocean temperatures and sea-level and the ocean’s role in the climate system can provide a lifetime of rich and rewarding experiences around the globe. This major gives you the skills and knowledge to work as an oceanographer anywhere in the world.

Introductory Units

Provides fundamental tools of one variable calculus that are essential in the application of mathematics in science, engineering and economics. Review of basic functions. Algebraic and order properties of the real number system. Limits and continuity of functions of a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

KMA154 is a continuation of KMA152, with emphasis on the application of single-variable calculus to problems in the mathematical, physical, and biological sciences; economics; and engineering.Topics include: introductory linear and matrix algebra; solving systems of linear equations using Gaussian elimination…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Intermediate Units

This unit extends concepts from single variable calculus (KMA152 and KMA154) into the domain of several variables. Particular attention is given to the 3 dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems. Topics include the analysis of general surfaces, quadric surfaces…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Covers use of calculus and applied linear algebra in solving problems that arise in the modelling of real-world situations in biology, physics, chemistry and engineering. Introduction to phenomena that involve continuous change with time; dynamical systems. Linear and non-linear differential…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Advanced Units

Human induced climate change is arguably the most serious problem currently facing our planet. Detection and attribution of human induced climate change requires an understanding of the mechanisms of natural climate variability as well as trends in climate. Earth's climate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a more advanced course in oceanography, focused on biogeochemical and physical oceanography, and marine geoscience. It builds on the material presented in KSA205 Introduction to Oceanography. The biogeochemical oceanography part covers mechanisms involved in the carbon cycle…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Oceanographic Methods (KSA724) - Courses & Units - University of Tasmania, AustraliaThe goal of the unit is to introduce students to research at sea and provide hands-on exposure to standard methods and data in physical, chemical and biological oceanography. Students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the geophysical fluid dynamics governing the ocean circulations with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. The unit will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sustainability is the key to the future of the aquaculture industry. Designed with industry needs in mind, gain knowledge and skills to create innovative processes that provide sustainable environmental, economic, and community benefits to, and from, the aquaculture industry.

Introductory Units

Provides an introduction to the scientific study of animals. Students are introduced to animal diversity through studying the major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with an emphasis on Australian examples. We consider the structural and functional characteristics of each group from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sustainable marine food production introduces students to core principles, industry practices and current technologies that underpin site selection, production and harvest of major seafood species. The unit explores biology and behaviour and their importance in the development of production technologies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Intermediate Units

Students will gain knowledge and understanding of the practical and theoretical concepts involved in the production of current and future commercially important aquatic species (including molluscs, crustaceans and finfish). Students will be able to relate the biology of culture species…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will integrate knowledge about larval and early life history biology with the practices and processes that underpin hatchery operations for algal, molluscan, crustacean and finfish production. This unit will expose students to a range of practices across key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Advanced Units

The unit provides students with a detailed understanding of aquatic animal feeds and nutrition from selection of ingredients to the impact of feeds on product quality. The relationships between nutrition and farming practice, feed formulation, physiology and biochemistry of aquatic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with understanding of aquatic animal health issues, relevant to aquaculture and wild fisheries. Disease diagnosis, biosecurity in aquaculture, disease control and treatment are discussed. Host, environment and pathogen relationships are examined. A wide range of exotic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit exposes students to a detailed examination of the physiology and behaviour of aquatic animals, with an emphasis on fish and crustaceans. Development, growth, respiration, osmoregulation excretion, reproduction, endocrinology and sensory physiology are discussed in relation to the effects…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with an understanding of the practice and application of molecular biology and technology in marine and aquatic ecosystems. Students learn and practice modern molecular techniques used to characterise, manipulate and compare DNA, RNA and proteins, use…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introductory Units

KSA101 will provide a background to the science and management of the seas with focus on Antarctic and Southern Ocean. On the completion of this unit, students will demonstrate a knowledge and comprehension of the contemporary issues facing Antarctic, marine…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the science disciplines underpinning the study of marine and Antarctic environments and the application of science to solve problems in marine and Antarctic disciplines. It provides the foundational skills and knowledge for students in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the processing, visualization, analysis and interpretation of spatial marine and Antarctic datasets and the programming tools needed to work with them. This unit will focus on marine specific spatial data using widely used programming…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    
Choose 1 unit from (Note Year 12 pre-requisites apply to KYA101)

Introduces the management and interpretation of quantitative information. A 'hands-on' course, developed using data which is drawn from disciplines of relevance to the students. Topics include: collecting, processing and presenting quantitative information; descriptive statistics for summarising data; data exploration techniques;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Dynamics, special relativity, electromagnetism and electrical circuits are studied in depth. Topics in dynamics include vectors, Newton's Laws, energy and momentum conservation, friction, rotational motion and torque. Special relativity covers time dilation, length contraction, Lorentz position and velocity transforms, relativistic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    

Intermediate Units

The purpose of the unit is to provide students with an introduction to the oceans, its environments and how they function, including a history of oceanography and its early development; basic properties of the oceans; physical processes of the ocean…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to expose students to the diversity of views about the state of the marine environment and the impact of extractive industries such as fishing. Students will gain experience exploring relevant questions using a variety of methodological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In Marine and Antarctic Ecosystems you will be introduced to coastal and open ocean ecosystems from the tropics to the poles, covering water-column and benthic communities including reefs and the deep sea. The unit will cover the fundamental processes of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    
Choose 1 unit from

This unit builds upon first year units that teach statistics. The emphasis in this unit is on training scientists to be literate in statistical issues so that both "consumers" and "producers" of data analysis will be able to effectively communicate.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to extend the knowledge of statistical data analysis. It builds on the concepts of regression and ANOVA introduced in Data Handling & Statistics 1 and introduces analyses using multiple explanatory variables, mixed-effects models and generalized linear…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

2 electives are normally selected in Years 1 and Year 2 and 4 electives in Year 3

In your Elective component you can choose from any units marked as "Student Electives" which you meet the pre-requisites for, at any level, from across the university. To search for possible Elective units, use the Unit Search tool to search by the discipline that you are interested in.

Need help choosing you first year units? Try the Unit Selection Guide.

Entry requirements

We encourage you to apply for the courses you most want to study. If you are not eligible to enter your chosen course right now, the UTAS admissions team will work with you to find the best pathway option.

Enquire online for advice on the application process and the available pathways to study at UTAS.

DOMESTIC APPLICANTS

Domestic applicants who recently completed secondary education

Applicants are ranked by ATAR and offers made based on the number of places available. We anticipate that the lowest ATAR that will receive an offer for this course in 2021 will be 65.

Applicants who have recently completed senior secondary studies but have not received an ATAR may still be eligible for admission. We will consider your subject results on a case-by-case basis when we assess your application.

Domestic applicants with higher education study

To be eligible for an offer, applicants must have:

  • Partially completed an undergraduate course at Diploma level or higher (or equivalent). Applicants must have completed at least two units of study (equivalent to 25 UTAS credit points). If an applicant has failed any units the application may be subject to further review before an offer is made; OR
  • Completed the UTAS University Preparation Program (or an equivalent qualification offered by an Australian University).

Domestic applicants with VET / TAFE study

To be eligible for an offer, applicants must have completed a Certificate IV (or equivalent) in any discipline.

Domestic applicants with work and life experience

Applicants without senior secondary, tertiary or VET / TAFE study can complete a personal competency statement.

Applicants may be eligible for an offer if they have relevant work and / or life experiences which demonstrate a capacity to succeed in this course.

Subject Prerequisites

Note some majors within the course require studies and experience equivalent to satisfactory performance in the following Tasmanian Senior Secondary subjects:

Marine and Antarctic Governance: Nil

Marine Biology: Chemistry (CHM415115) and General Mathematics (MTG315115) or Mathematics Methods (MTM315117)

Marine Resource Management: Nil

Oceanography: Mathematics Methods (MTM417117) and Physics (PHY415115)

Sustainable Aquaculture: Nil

You can enquire online for information on interstate and international equivalents to the Tasmanian senior secondary subjects above. If you have not met this prerequisite, you will need to complete a UTAS foundation unit before you start your course.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATION

If your ability to access or participate in education has been affected by circumstances beyond your control, you can apply for special consideration as part of your application. We will consider a range of factors for special consideration, including economic hardship, a serious medical condition or disability.

We can only approve applications for special consideration where we are confident that you have the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in your studies. If your application is not approved, the UTAS admissions team will work with you to find the best alternative pathway to your chosen course. Special consideration is not available for international applicants.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

Admissions and application information for international applicants, including English language requirements, is available from the International Future Students site. You can also enquire online to check your eligibility.

You may be eligible for advanced standing (i.e. credit points) in this degree if you:

  • Have completed an award such as a Diploma or Advanced Diploma from another institution;
  • Are currently studying another Bachelor degree at the University or at another institution;
  • Have completed a Bachelor degree at the University or an equivalent award from another institution.
How to apply for a credit transfer

You can apply for a credit transfer/advanced standing as part of the standard online application process for this degree.

For more information on credit transfers, contact us on 1300 363 864 or enquire online.

This degree does not formally articulate from another degree. See Credit transfer for information on advanced standing from other qualification and experience, or Alternative entry pathways for pathway options into this degree.

If you successfully complete this course, you may be also be eligible to apply for a range of other postgraduate courses including Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas and Masters by coursework and research. Filter the Course list by Postgraduate to view the current courses available.

If you haven't completed the required pre-requisite unit(s), we offer foundation units to help you bridge the gap. Many run in spring and summer school so you can meet a prerequisite and not delay the start of your Bachelor level studies. HECS scholarships may also be available for domestic students.

If you aren’t eligible for an offer to this course, you should consider enrolment in the Diploma of University Studies (Science Specialisation) or the University Preparation Program.

In all cases, contact us to discuss an option best suited to your needs.

Detailed admissions information and advice for all undergraduate courses, including comprehensive, course-level student profiles, is available from UTAS Admissions.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Domestic students enrolled in a full fee paying place are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the fees you pay for each unit you enrol in. Full fee paying domestic students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Detailed tuition fee information for domestic students is available at the Domestic Student Fees website, including additional information in relation to a compulsory Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF).

International students

2021 Total Course Fee (international students): $117,881 AUD*.

Course cost based on a rate of $37,950 AUD per standard, full-time year of study (100 credit points).

* Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

International students

International students are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the annual rate. International students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Scholarships

Domestic Students

Each year, the University offers more than 900 awards to students from all walks of life, including those who have achieved high academic results; those from low socio-economic backgrounds; students with sporting ability; students undertaking overseas study; and students with a disability.

IMAS provides a number of relocation scholarships to encourage students relocating from interstate, or Tasmanian students who are required to move away from home, to study at IMAS and to assist with relocation expenses.

Applications for most awards commencing in Semester 1 open at the beginning of August and close strictly on 31 October in the year prior to study.

For information on all scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

International students

There are a huge range of scholarships, bursaries and fee discounts available for international students studying at the University of Tasmania. For more information on these, visit the Tasmanian International Scholarships (TIS) website.

Additional costs

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 6226 6200
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
Online enquiries

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